Jump to content
The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

Identification of rank required please...


PabloC
 Share

Recommended Posts

Evening,

I was just wondering if anyone would be able to either confirm, or otherwise, that the rank of the soldier in the attached photograph is that of a Warrant Officer Class II, as indicated by the crown worn on his left sleeve.

Also, is the small strip above his left chest pocket of any significance?

Regards

Paul

post-22213-1203981109.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can't help with the rank, but the "strip" would appear to be the ribband bar of the 1914 Star (authorized late 1917, issued from early 1918), basically means he was out since the beginning of the war.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cheers Andrew,

Trying to tie him in with the only potential MIC I can find you see. I know he was a sergeant of some sort, as my great aunt - his daughter has told me, and there's only one such MIC for a Joseph Bennett of the South Wales Borderers. MIC says he was 'Acting WOII'.

The crown on the sleeve does look very much like the WOII badge, plus, the medal card I have says he was awarded the 1914 Star, so this would seem to match up too with what you've said about the photograph.

Oh, also, his date of entry into theatre is stated as 1/10/14, so this would tie in with the awarding of the 1914 Star too.

Paul

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Paul

I cleaned him up a bit.

This picture appears to be taken from a group shot of men recovering from wounds - the others are wearing hospital blues.

He is wearing wound stripes which can be used to date the picture as wound stripes were not authorized until later (although I do not recall the date someone will!)

The I would associate a crown with a warrant officer but I will leave that to the experts. I think his amrband may be of blue cloth to indicate he is currently convalescent (it may cover sgt stripes?)

have you checked the ancestry "pension" records? with two wounds it would seem he may have had grounds to later claim a

Chris

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi,

If I can mix the modern with the Great War period, the crown at the wrist would certainly mean WOII, but more than that it would be the badge of a Company Sergeant Major. Other WOII appointments would generally carry an extra embellishment such as a laurel wreath for the Regimental Quatertermaster Sergeant or even a seperate badge, which wehn worn in association with a crown would denote a Sergeant Major Instructor. Crossed guns for example would be a Sergeant Major Instructor of Gunnery or SMIG for short. I know the RQMS was in existence during the Great War but I'm not certain about the SMIG.

Whatever his appointment, your man here is definitely a WOII.

Cheers,

Nigel

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good Morning,

Thanks for the information Chris and Nigel, it's a great help. I have searched and searched the Ancestry Service record and pension databases but to no avail. Apparently, he never received a pension though anyway.

I thought it was some kind of wedding photo at first!!! However, if they're in hospital clothing this makes sense. He was gassed, and died as a result in Fazakereley Sanitorium, Liverpool in 1934. As such, I would be very interested to know if the photo can be dated via the 'wound stripes'.

The following is written (or stamped...not sure) on the reverse of the photograph: 'N.H.I No. AY 689005 - C' Might anyone know if I can find out more with this number? Date of admission perhaps? Sorry if that's a bit off-topic!

It's looking exceedingly likely that the MIC referring to an 'Acting WOII' is indeed my Great grandfather's then.

Regards

Paul

ps. I've attached the photo in its original size

post-22213-1204014731.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The number is in the right format for a National Insurance No. these were introduced in 1911 I believe. The next puzzle is who's number it is .

Peter

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There is a long thread on armlets, brassards etc - easily found by 'search' - which indicates that a blue one was for 'hospital' use. I would have thought it unlikely that a sergeant's stripes would still be on the sleeve of a WOII, however temporary his appointment.

Daggers

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I concur with Daggers. I also do not believe a sergeant would have covered his stripes with an armband. CSM with 2 wound stripes, in hospital and appears to be supporting his left arm , or is that my imagination? Any ID on the medal ribbon? Why is he in uniform and not in hospital blues? Is he being discharged or has he returned to visit?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Tom,

The medal ribbon is that of the 1914 Star apparently. Why might he be wearing an armband though? I'm 100% certain that he was a sergeant, as his daughter has verified this. Plus, we have postcards where he's addressed himself as Sgt. Joseph Bennett, SWB etc.

I'm not sure of any injury he may have sustained to his arm, but, wouldn't discount the possibility. He was definitely gassed though.

Paul

Link to comment
Share on other sites

He is a WO II if photo taken after mid-1915, which it is.

Wound badges intro. mid 1916.

1914 star late 1917, ribbon rapidly available.

As to sergeant, almost all WO IIs were sergeants earlier.

The RQMS additional wreath was not until 1918, before which date they were badged as CSM, both WO II.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the clean up Chris, and thanks for the dating information Grumpy!

So, if I'm after a rough date, I suppose late 1917, into 1918 woldn't be far out would it?

Given the fact that he's wearing the badge of a WOII, and there's only one Joseph Bennett, of the South Wales Borderers who was acting WOII within the MIC's the card has to be that of my great grandfathers.

So, I wonder what ever happened to his medals....hmm!

Thanks again.

Paul

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...