Jump to content
Great War Forum

Remembered Today:

Guest Guard 1

Lincolnshire Regiment 1914-1918

Recommended Posts

Guest Guard 1

I have a copy of THE HISTORY OF THE LINCOLNSHIRE REGIMENT 1914-1918 by MAJOR-GENERAL C.R.SIMPSON C.B.

ANY INFO WANTED JUST POST HERE.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dee

Hi

Wondered if the book contains any info on 1st (Garrison) Bn who were posted to India to join 8th (Lucknow) Presidence Brigade Indian Army. Additionally anything on 2nd/5th Bn if there is any or am I being a little too specific?

Many thanks

Dee :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Guard 1

Hi Dee,

The 2/5 Lincolns were formed in Luton in January 1915 and became part of the 177th brigade of the 59th division. The men for this battalion were taken from a provisional battalion organised at Dunstable in september 1914 of drafts of men from Lincoln, Grimsby and Leicester. This also applies to the 2/4 battalion.

After service in Ireland in 1916 these two battalions went to France with the 59th division in febuary 1917. Finally they were asbored into the 1/5th battalion.

If theres a perticular date you wanted to know about I will have a look for you. There is to much to write on the 2/5 battalion. But a quick flick through the book and they do seem to have been in some actions in 1917 and 1918.

As for the 1st Garrison battalion all I know is whats on the main site. I do have a memorial plaque to PTE HERBERT BEECHAM WHO DIED ON THE 23/07/1916 from this battalion.

Rowland.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dee
If theres a perticular date you wanted to know about I will have a look for you. There is to much to write on the 2/5 battalion. But a quick flick through the book and they do seem to have been in some actions in 1917 and 1918.

Hi Rowland

The CWGC records a KIA date of 27.4.17 and my man is buried in Fontaine-Au-Pire Communal Cemetary. We believe that he was taken as a POW as the cemetary contained a number of burials carried out by the enemy. If there is anything around this date, I would be grateful.

Regards

Dee

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Guard 1

Hi Dee,

Sorry a lot to read but very intresting. If he was a POW it seems a little odd he was KIA. If you can provide me with his name or number I can do a search on Soldiers Died for you.

THE GERMAN RETREAT AND THE BRITISH ADVANCE TO THE HINDENBURG LINE 14TH MARCH-5 APRIL.

This is the nearest action to the date your man was KIA.

On the night of the 13th march the battalions in the front line, support or reserve, between Damery, on the Roye-Amiens road, and Arras were the 2/4th and 2/5th, south of the Somme, the former in support at Belloy-en-santerre, the latter in dug-outs in Triangle wood.

The diary of the 2/5th records "It is believed that the eneny had withdrawn east of the Somme". After darkness had fallen on the evening of the 16th red flares were observed burning in the German trenches all up and down the line. This was the signal for the withdrawal.

On the 17th raids were carried out north and south of the Estrees-Villers Carbonnel road. Each raiding party found the enemy had evacuated his front line. So the advance began immediately. By noon the enemy was definitely reported clear of the eastern bank of the Somme river.

Beyond the old German front line the road was found damaged to such an extent that it was impassable for transport. Both the 2/4th and 2/5th were, therefore, hard at work repairing the road until the 20th.

On the 21st the 178th brigade relieved the 177th in the front line, and the Lincolnshires went back to Foucaucourt for a few day's rest.

On the 24th the 2/5th marched to Eterpigny. And the on the 26th took up an outpost line east of Beaumetz. At daybreak on the 27th German snipers from Hervilly fired on the Lincolnshires piquets and killed one man from the 2/4th. The 2/5th on the 27th marched to Nobescourt Farm, Placing an outpost on the Bernes-Hamelet road.

On the 31st the 2/5th Leicesters and the 2/4 Lincolns attacked Hebescourt, and cleared the enemy from the village. The 2/5th Lincolns also supplied forty-eight Lewis gunners and twenty four scouts and snipers to take part in the operation.

On the 1st April the 2/5th were still remained at Nobescourt Farm.

On the 3rd the 2/4th made there attack on the Fervaque Farm and Brosse Wood. They came under intense fire and had to had to withdraw. The 2/4th rested at Roisel and on 4th and on the 5th moved to Templeux and took up an outpost line. The 2/5th also recivied orders to move to Templeux on the 5th, but they did not set out from Nobescourt Farm until 6pm and it was dark when they reached Roisel, and they billeted here for the night. The 2/5th moved to Templeux on the 9th with orders to attack the enmey, but the latterhaving vacated the position, the battalion took over the captured trenches and established an outpost line along the eastern exits of Hargicourt.

At 6pm on the 10th the 2/5th were ordered to push there posts forward and bomb down the enemy trench from Hargicourt to Malakoff farm and capture en route the Quarry and Cologne farm. The Quarry was strongly defended by machine-guns. Later at 11pm brigade headquaters sent a message to the Lincolnshires that the enemy was retiring on the Hindenburg Line and 2/5th sent out patrols to confim the report. They returned at 3am on the 11th stating that the Quarry and ground in the nabourhood of Cologne Farm were clear of the enemy.

Orders for an immediate attack were issued to companies. The attack was made at 4.30am, but the report that the enemy had retiried was false, both the Quarry and Cologne Farm being strongly held. The result was that the 2/5th though fighting gallantly, were driven back to their original jumping-off line and sustained very heavy casualties. Captain T.Bryant and Lieutenant J.W.Walker were killed. Lieutenant J.Simons and 2nd Lieut J.H.S.Shrewsbury were wounded, and 2nd Lieut R.W.Alston was wounded and missing. In other ranks killed, wounded and missing, the losses were 254. A and C companies, who led, suffered most, and were temporarily formed into one composite company.

With us and the Germans both busy building new lines the 2/4th and 2/5th passed the summer of 1917 on the Somme. At the end of August the 2/5th were in a tented camp at Proven.

I sure your man would have been involved in all this. Maby he was taken POW in this attack or was KIA by artillary when building the new line.

Worth getting the war diary for the date he died from Kew.

All the best Rowland.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dee
If he was a POW it seems a little odd he was KIA. If you can provide me with his name or number I can do a search on Soldiers Died for you.

Hi Rowland

Thank you for the information, it will prove very useful. Thanks also for your offer for searching Soldiers Died. It's my husband's Great Great Uncle, Pte F G Udale, 241810, son of John & Selina Udale. I think I have already had a search done on him before from Soldiers Died but with no additional details.

The only reason for thinking that Pte Udale was a POW is because of the description given of the cemetary on the War Graves web site. I don't know why I put KIA, I think it is force of habit :)

Regards

Dee

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Guard 1

Hi Dee,

I've just checked soldiers died. Details below.

241810 Private Frederick George Udale 5th Battalion. Died 27/04/1917

Born- Ellastone, Derbyshire

Enlisted-Stokesley, Yorkshire

Residence- Ellastone, Derbyshire

All the best Rowland.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jim_davies

Dee,

You may want to contact Steve Bramley who posts on this forum. He has a database of the 5th (both first and second line battalions) Lincs and might be able to give you some ideas.

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Steve Bramley
Captain T.Bryant and Lieutenant J.W.Walker were killed. Lieutenant J.Simons and 2nd Lieut J.H.S.Shrewsbury were wounded, and 2nd Lieut R.W.Alston was wounded and missing. In other ranks killed, wounded and missing, the losses were 254.

Hi Jim... Dee,

There were 60 o.r's who lost their lives during the 'attack' described by Rowland taken from the Bn History. Those wounded would usually be about 3-1. My guess is that considering the 'surprise' nature of this action and the confusion that must of ensued in darkness, then certainly a proportion of the missing became prisoners.

I have one soldier on my database Pte 242145 Jack Fawcett of Grimsby who died on this day. His name appears on the Grimsby AVL in 1919 as a POW. I suspect that a reason for this happening is as there were still many local men in the Battalion at this time 'word' my have circulated as families were notified that loved ones were taken prisoner. (There are several other examples on the AVL) Pte Fawcett's relations were still holding out hope.

'Died' on SDitGW denotes a death by causes other than K.I.A. and Died of Wounds sustained due to action. As you say the CWGC desciption of Fontaine-au-Pire communal cemetery states:

'Other British graves were made by the enemy during the War'

As this cemetery was behind the Hindenburg Line at the time of Frederick's death it would suggest that he was a prisoner of war, perhaps due to the action of 11th April. As to how he died, the SDitGW entry would suppose that somebody knew. If his grave is marked then the Red Cross would, it seems, have been notified.

To find out more about POW you could ask on the Home and POWs section on the forum. To find out more about the circumstances about his burial try a posting on the Cemeteries and Memorials section, Terry Denham is the main man.

Incidentaly, the 2/5th seem to have been somewhat unlucky regarding POW, three complete companies were outflanked and taken prisoner on 22nd March during the German spring offensive in 1918.

I hope this helps a little but it is all guesswork!

Good Luck,

Steve.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest angloanglo

Rowland

Can you give me any information concerning this relative of mine.

Clixby ED (Edward Denis)

Second Lieutenant

Lincolnshire Regiment

4th, Bn

Age 18Yrs

Died 13/10/1915

Son of Joseph Keyworth Clixby and Annabel Clixby, Limber House, Habrough, Lincs.

Loos Memorial, Panel 31 to 34

Many thanks

Richard Turner, son of Betty Clixby

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chris

Hi angloanglo.

Rowland, sorry to to jump in; bit the name Clixby caught my attention. I am sure he is commemorated in the church at Great Limber. They have a lovely memorial in the church that lists them all on a wooden panel, and at the opposite end of the church there are photos of the men listed and i am sure one of the photos is of edward Clixby. I will email a friend and hope he can confirm this for me. He would have been killed at the Hohenzollern Redoubt, and as he was in the 4th Lincs, it would be a good idea to email forum member Jim Davies who is very knowledgable on this battalion.

Hope of interest

Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jim_davies

Richard,

Edward Denis Clixby is mentioned in the London Gazette, on 6 Nov 1914.

He joined the 4th Lincs from the Berkhamstead School Contingent Junior Division, OTC.

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brigantian

Hi Rowland

I am researching Lt Hubert Kirkby Peace, 3rd Bn York & Lancs, attached 1st Bn Lincolnshire Regiment.

He was educated at Rugby School and his biography in the school’s roll of honour states that he was wounded at Aubers on 15 October 1914 and died on 16 October. However, SDGW and CWGC record his death as taking place on 18 October.

I would be grateful for any information contained in the history about the 1st Lincs movements around this time and anything on Hubert Peace.

Thanks

Mark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
esmeralda1961

I have a copy of THE HISTORY OF THE LINCOLNSHIRE REGIMENT 1914-1918 by MAJOR-GENERAL C.R.SIMPSON C.B.

ANY INFO WANTED JUST POST HERE.

Hello Yes please... Im looking for information on my grandpa charles herbert (Bert) Bailey regiment number 5180 primarily. I have other people i'd like to find information on but Im starting with the most important first.

He enlisted December 1915 . I have a copy of his diary but its not easy to read. It seems he did alot of training in Ireland before going to France.

friday night 16 - 3 - 1917 big advance...I dont know any more of this.

The diary mentions dates and places but not alot of info as to what went on.

He returned home to Stamford some where in february 1919.It was Thursday and he arrived at 2.30 is all I know.

He was in hospital a few times. 15/8/17 a hospital near Rouen

Then hospital Saint George in winchester

An ambulance train took him to a hospital near Boulonge jan 7th 1918. Left Boulonge on sat for boat to Dover then to Leicester northern general hospital p ward .

April he was in Boer Hospital

His brother Walter Edward or Edmund Bailey was reported missing March 21

Walter died on 21 march 1918 aged 25 in France. He was a private in the lincolnshire regiment 5th Battalion . Theatre of war western european theatre.

If anyone has a diary of the regiment and more details I would be really pleased to find out specifics of what he got up to.

Many thanks in advance.

Other people mentioned in the diary - some are relatives

Private C Thistleton 3985 2/5 batt lincs reg

was in RAMC 30 General Hospital

was also POW 21st camp APC

Private J Kirk 31278

118n south lancs regiment

was in RC Hospital cirencester

L/Cpt G Fandgate 20225 CO platoon c company 2/4 lincoln reg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sakr al Amn

Hi I am trying to get a definitive transfer year (date) for Capt J S Nichols MC from 5th Lincolns to 1st Borders his medal card is a bit confused as there is Indian GSM entries on it. He goes onto lead an incredibly colourful life but his WW1 service is a little confused. Or rather I am a little confused. I know the chap was the subject of a thread a good few years back.

Any help appreciated.

Sakr

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
towisuk

Esmeralda....

The Diary page for 5th Lincs that covers March 21st 1918...is a very poor copy..I've had to enhance it to make it almost readable...but in trying to get it under100k to post here,it would be illegible...

They were at Sailly la Bois, but a few days previously had been in the Hohenzollern redoubt area ...was Walter KIA or died of wounds....?

I've sent you a PM ......

regards

Tom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chris

Esmerelda/Tom

Walter was Pte. 202160 and on the date he was killed he was serving with the 2/5th Lincolnshire's. They suffered badly in the German offensive, and Walter was originally posted missing in action whilst serving with B Company (red Cross Enquiry Lists).

Regarding Nichols. My notes have been packed away but he was still serving with the 5th Lincs on 17th Oct 1918 as he was heavily involved in leading the attack by the 1/5th Lincs on Andigny-les-Fermes on that day.

Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chris

An Account of the Part Taken by the 2/5th Bn. the Lincolnshire Regt in the German Offensive commencing on 21st March 1918

On the 21st March 1918 the Bn. was part of the brigade in Reserve to the 59th Division and was in camp at MORY.

Intermittent gunfire throughout the night increased in violence till about 4:00am there was no doubt that something was happening in the front line. Bn. was ordered to "Stand To" and shortly afterwards orders to that effect were received from 177 Bde.

At 7:00am the Bn. was ordered to advance at once to the Assembly position. The move was completed and the Bn. formed up in artillery formation by 7:36am.

Patrols were sent out at 8:50am under 2nd/Lts E.A. OENNIS and F.SHARPE along ECOUST

SPUR and track to VRACOURT COPSE respectively. These patrols reported heavy shelling of ECOUST and on firing and support lines of 3rd. system. Also a runner of 178 Brigade informed them that no enemy infantry attack had developed by 9:00am in the front system.

At 12 noon the Bn. was ordered to advance and occupy the support trench of the First Battle System in C.G. The 4 Leicesters was to be on our left. The Bn. advanced along Track 3 until through the wire of the 2nd. Battle System, and there extended into artillery formation, "A" Coy on right leading roughly along the NOREUIL SWITCH, "B", "C" and "D" Coys extending to the left, Bn. H.Q. being 200x in rear. On Bn. H.Q. passing the wire of the firing line 3rd system, it was noticed that the coys. were apparently easing too much to the right and orders were about to be sent to rectify this. During the whole of this advance the Bn. was under heavy artillery fire and M.G. fire. Several officers were wounded and included 2nd Lts. R.G. EEDES, F.B.SMITH and G. TAYLOR and R.S.M. W. COLDWELL. When Bn. H.Q. arrived the cause of the coy's drawing to the right was apparent. Large masses of the enemy were seen streaming over the ridge to the S.E. of LONGATTE and they were already in possession of our objective. Seeing this, it appears that the company commanders decided the best thing to do was to man the NOREUIL SWITCH and thus outflank the enemy. The C.O. decided to also man the NOREUIL SWITCH, with Bn. H.Q. and 2 platoons of "D" Coy, which were a little behind the front line. An officer patrol, under 2nd. Lt. R.E. CREASEY, was sent along the NOREUIL SWITCH to get in touch with the remainder of the Bn. He had not gone far when he met parties of the enemy in between B.H.Q. and the Coys in front. He and most of the patrol were wounded. At this time it was observed that large bodies of enemy troops were advancing from NOREUIL up the HIRONOELLE VALLEY and on the spur beyond. Seeing this, the C.O. decided to man the firing line of the 3rd. System. Owing to the shape of the ground it was impossible to see what was happening to the rest of the Bn. A patrol was sent out under Sergt. WHATMOUGH along the NOREUIL SWITCH to try and find the position of the coys. in front and to establish the enemy's dispositions. This patrol could not proceed as they met large enemy forces and neither could they see anything of the companies in front.

On arriving in the firing line of the 3rd System it was found that the 4th LINCOLN Rgt. were holding it to our left but there was a considerable gap, which was closed with the few troops available. Major G.H. DEANE of the 4th Lincolns came over and reported the situation and dispositions of his unit. No information was received as to the position of the 2/4th Leicester Regt. The enemy in the meantime appeared to be moving in large numbers across our front from right to left and getting into the valley. These were engaged by our two remaining Lewis Guns and with rifle fire. They reached the wire in front of us but were beaten off. Major H.WARD was sent off to the left to get to know the location of the 4th Leicesters. He was unfortunately killed in so doing. At this time Sergt. GARNHAM, who was commanding the extreme right platoon, about the junction of the NOREUIL SWITCH with the firing line 3rd System, reported the presence of the enemy in considerable numbers in VRACOURT COPSE. He states that his Lewis Gun and rifle fire did considerable execution. A message was sent to Bde. H.Q. to inform artillery.

It was now decided to move Bn. H.Q. from the firing line to the support line. It moved along the firing line of the 3rd System until the ECOUST-BEUNATRE road, at which point the O.C. 4th Leicesters was met, who gave the situation on the left flank. Bn. H.Q. moved down the road to support line 3rd System and met O.C. 4th Lincolns and it was agreed to form a joint Bn. H.Q.

A patrol was now sent out under Sergt. WATMOUGH to creep along the HIRONDELLE VALLEY. Patrol reported that it could not proceed beyond owing to heavy M.G. and rifle fire from VRACOURT COPSE. Capt. L.M. WEBBER R.A.M.C. (T) M.O. i/c/ Bn. had established his aid post in the front line at the beginning of the battle. This was necessary as there was no chance of casualties reaching him until dark if the aid post had been further back, and many of the wounded, officers and men, were in need of more attention than could be given by stretcher bearers. He carried out his duties in a most gallant manner until he himself was severely wounded.

At this time it appeared that our right flank was in danger of being turned and troops were asked for to fill up the gap between our right and the left of the 6th Division on our right. A Pioneer Bn. 6/7 Royal Scots. Fus. were sent up for this purpose. Orders were received that the Bde. would be relieved in the front line by the 14 Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders and H.L.I. and that 177 Bde. would occupy the support line of the 3rd System. 4th Lincolns on right, 5th Lincolns centre and 4th Leicesters on left.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
towisuk

Hi Chris, and many thanks for your help there mate....I've spent a lot of time in the Mory area, my pal Jim lost an uncle there in August 1918. He was in the Kings Liverpool Regiment and attacking Mory Copse when he went missing...

Best regards

Tom

p.s. trench map dated 21 March 1918 that cover some of the area in your report above Chris............

http://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/#zoom=15&lat=50.14166&lon=2.92579&layers=101465149

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sakr al Amn

Hi Chris many thanks for the info I shall press on with my research article on Brigadier 'Crasher' Nichols. I got to see his medals, which are an impressive set:

DSO (and bar), MC (and bar), 1914-15 Star, British War Medal, Allied Victory Medal (with MID leaves), George V Indian GSM (with two Waziristan bars), George VI GSM Palestine, 1939-1945 Star, Africa Star (8th Army Bar), France and Germany Star, Defence Medal, War Medal (with MID leaves), Greek Military Cross and US Legion of Merit (Officer Grade).

An officer with a hell of a career and it is proving interesting researching his career.

Regards

Sakr

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Chris

Sakr

Here is Nichols in 1917 in France

post-1012-0-67560000-1414964996_thumb.jp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sakr al Amn

Chris

Really useful many thanks indeed. Here is him as a Brigadier:

http://www.npg.org.uk/collections/search/portrait/mw221195/John-Sebastian-Nichols?LinkID=mp132961&role=sit&rNo=0

Not to sure how to attach the photo, not that techy!!

Regards

Sakr

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sakr al Amn

I need a bit of help getting my head around the London Gazette entries on John Sebastian Nichols (5th Lincolns and then 1st Borders) with a bit of time in Indian Army Reserve of Officers in Waziristan. But the time line below looks a little confused:

· Army List 1915, 5th Battalion (Territorial) Lincolnshire Regiment - Second Lieutenant J S Nichols, commissioned 19 September 1914 and shown as on active service

· Supplement to the London Gazette, 27 June 1917, Page 6370 – Lieutenant J S Nichols to be Captain in Lincolnshire Regiment, with precedence as from 1 June 1916

· Supplement to the London Gazette, 1 December 1919, Page 14810 - Lieutenant J S Nichols relinquishes his temporary commission, 27 September 1919

· The London Gazette, 9 September 1924. Page 6717 - Lieutenant J S Nichols MC, to be Captain in Border Regiment. Regular Forces. 18 August 1924

Sakr is a bit confused!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
esmeralda1961

An Account of the Part Taken by the 2/5th Bn. the Lincolnshire Regt in the German Offensive commencing on 21st March 1918

On the 21st March 1918 the Bn. was part of the brigade in Reserve to the 59th Division and was in camp at MORY.

Intermittent gunfire throughout the night increased in violence till about 4:00am there was no doubt that something was happening in the front line. Bn. was ordered to "Stand To" and shortly afterwards orders to that effect were received from 177 Bde.

At 7:00am the Bn. was ordered to advance at once to the Assembly position. The move was completed and the Bn. formed up in artillery formation by 7:36am.

Patrols were sent out at 8:50am under 2nd/Lts E.A. OENNIS and F.SHARPE along ECOUST

SPUR and track to VRACOURT COPSE respectively. These patrols reported heavy shelling of ECOUST and on firing and support lines of 3rd. system. Also a runner of 178 Brigade informed them that no enemy infantry attack had developed by 9:00am in the front system.

At 12 noon the Bn. was ordered to advance and occupy the support trench of the First Battle System in C.G. The 4 Leicesters was to be on our left. The Bn. advanced along Track 3 until through the wire of the 2nd. Battle System, and there extended into artillery formation, "A" Coy on right leading roughly along the NOREUIL SWITCH, "B", "C" and "D" Coys extending to the left, Bn. H.Q. being 200x in rear. On Bn. H.Q. passing the wire of the firing line 3rd system, it was noticed that the coys. were apparently easing too much to the right and orders were about to be sent to rectify this. During the whole of this advance the Bn. was under heavy artillery fire and M.G. fire. Several officers were wounded and included 2nd Lts. R.G. EEDES, F.B.SMITH and G. TAYLOR and R.S.M. W. COLDWELL. When Bn. H.Q. arrived the cause of the coy's drawing to the right was apparent. Large masses of the enemy were seen streaming over the ridge to the S.E. of LONGATTE and they were already in possession of our objective. Seeing this, it appears that the company commanders decided the best thing to do was to man the NOREUIL SWITCH and thus outflank the enemy. The C.O. decided to also man the NOREUIL SWITCH, with Bn. H.Q. and 2 platoons of "D" Coy, which were a little behind the front line. An officer patrol, under 2nd. Lt. R.E. CREASEY, was sent along the NOREUIL SWITCH to get in touch with the remainder of the Bn. He had not gone far when he met parties of the enemy in between B.H.Q. and the Coys in front. He and most of the patrol were wounded. At this time it was observed that large bodies of enemy troops were advancing from NOREUIL up the HIRONOELLE VALLEY and on the spur beyond. Seeing this, the C.O. decided to man the firing line of the 3rd. System. Owing to the shape of the ground it was impossible to see what was happening to the rest of the Bn. A patrol was sent out under Sergt. WHATMOUGH along the NOREUIL SWITCH to try and find the position of the coys. in front and to establish the enemy's dispositions. This patrol could not proceed as they met large enemy forces and neither could they see anything of the companies in front.

On arriving in the firing line of the 3rd System it was found that the 4th LINCOLN Rgt. were holding it to our left but there was a considerable gap, which was closed with the few troops available. Major G.H. DEANE of the 4th Lincolns came over and reported the situation and dispositions of his unit. No information was received as to the position of the 2/4th Leicester Regt. The enemy in the meantime appeared to be moving in large numbers across our front from right to left and getting into the valley. These were engaged by our two remaining Lewis Guns and with rifle fire. They reached the wire in front of us but were beaten off. Major H.WARD was sent off to the left to get to know the location of the 4th Leicesters. He was unfortunately killed in so doing. At this time Sergt. GARNHAM, who was commanding the extreme right platoon, about the junction of the NOREUIL SWITCH with the firing line 3rd System, reported the presence of the enemy in considerable numbers in VRACOURT COPSE. He states that his Lewis Gun and rifle fire did considerable execution. A message was sent to Bde. H.Q. to inform artillery.

It was now decided to move Bn. H.Q. from the firing line to the support line. It moved along the firing line of the 3rd System until the ECOUST-BEUNATRE road, at which point the O.C. 4th Leicesters was met, who gave the situation on the left flank. Bn. H.Q. moved down the road to support line 3rd System and met O.C. 4th Lincolns and it was agreed to form a joint Bn. H.Q.

A patrol was now sent out under Sergt. WATMOUGH to creep along the HIRONDELLE VALLEY. Patrol reported that it could not proceed beyond owing to heavy M.G. and rifle fire from VRACOURT COPSE. Capt. L.M. WEBBER R.A.M.C. (T) M.O. i/c/ Bn. had established his aid post in the front line at the beginning of the battle. This was necessary as there was no chance of casualties reaching him until dark if the aid post had been further back, and many of the wounded, officers and men, were in need of more attention than could be given by stretcher bearers. He carried out his duties in a most gallant manner until he himself was severely wounded.

At this time it appeared that our right flank was in danger of being turned and troops were asked for to fill up the gap between our right and the left of the 6th Division on our right. A Pioneer Bn. 6/7 Royal Scots. Fus. were sent up for this purpose. Orders were received that the Bde. would be relieved in the front line by the 14 Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders and H.L.I. and that 177 Bde. would occupy the support line of the 3rd System. 4th Lincolns on right, 5th Lincolns centre and 4th Leicesters on left.

thanks for all that info - i will pass to my uncle

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RudgwickPreservationSoc

Can Esmeralda 1961 please help me to find the war diary entries for Lt William Maxwell Robertson, Lincolnshire Regiment. Firstly, 26 August 1914, wounded at ?Mons with 1st battalion. Secondly, 24 Jan 1915, wounded at ?location, with 2nd battalion. Thirdly, and most importantly, 27 and 28 Jun 1915, missing on patrol, possible prisoner of war, but confirmed killed by Geneva Red Cross, still with 2 battlalion, at Bois Greniers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...