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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

2Lt. Terence O'Brien


Cnock

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Hello,

I am looking for info concerning the death of 2Lt. Terence Donough O'Brien, 6 Sqn RFC, + 3/3/1916,

son of Brig-General E. O'Brien.

Regards,

Cnock

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Cnock,

Not sure if you have this.

Andy

post-1871-1178565032.jpg

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Source is "Wykehamists Who Died in The War 1914 - 1918" Volume 4

Andy

post-1871-1178565176.jpg

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Cnock

2Lt T D O'Brien (formerly 16th Lancers) was flying as observer in BE 2c 4324 of No 6 Sqn RFC, piloted by 2Lt R A Pierpoint , when he was killed in an accident on 3 March 1916. 2Lt Pierpoint was injured.

I hope that this helps.

Gareth

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Hi Cnock,

Just to fill in the picture a little it is interesting to note that Lt O'Brien's death was the first loss of an aircrew for Number 6 squadron that year (1916) and in fact only one aircraft was lost to enemy action during the first six months of 1916 (Lts Fincham and Price killed on 9th March). This is all the more surprising because since the start of that year the squadron's activities had been confined to the dangerous role of artillery co-operation (viz. ranging for the batteries) and in early March the Fokker 'scourge' - the Eindekker - was at its height with no allied single seater fighter squadron yet assigned to support the Army wing of II Brigade. Operating in mostly poor flying conditions (wind, clouds and mist) the aircraft of Number 6 were constantly in the air (as were the aircraft of Number 5 squadron, who were also based at Abeele). Only the day before Lt O'Brien died he would have been involved in a 'General Artillery Action'. Such a request from the V Corps commander required the whole of the squadron to stop what it was doing and concentrate on the specific task at hand, in this instance in the support of what turned out to be a successful British counter offensive at 'The Bluff', four kilometres south east of Ypres. Though I can provide you with no details as to the reason for the accident, Lt O'Brien's pilot and all of the other pilots involved in the operation would have been flying under extremely adverse conditions at the time, with the constant risk of accidents, especially at a rather cramped aerodrome that was not the easiest for taking off and landing in the best of weather conditions.

If I haven't bored you yet, Lt O'Brien was one of the flight crews who flew in the successful and popular FE2b during the latter half of 1915 and early 1916, until these aircraft were sent away to Number 20 squadron in February 1916. Number 6 was left with a single type of aircraft, the BE2c, in line with other squadrons on the Western Front. This decision was not a popular one in the squadron as the BE2c was recognised as being far less able to be defended than the old 'Fee'.

Regards

Steve

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Andy, Gareth, Steve,

Thank You for the replies.

Steve, You can never bore me with this kind of info.

Regards,

Cnock

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Cnock,

If you need a fullsoze photograph let me know, although with the new image size on the forum you should be able to get a good image.

Andy

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