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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

Huts


JRichards

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Can anyone help me with the name of the type of hut described by a nurse in 1917 (unfortunately, the name is the only thing I can't read):

" They are very long and instead of windows there are canvas shutters which can be hooked back to let in air and light. These huts are built before we get them and just have to be put together. We have been told that the greater part of the construction is women’s work". - Sister Elsie Tranter.

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It would be very hard to determine what type of hut it was with just that description. There were many variants. One was the 'Amiens Hut' used from about late 1916 onwards, corrugated iron walls with a sailcloth roof. Women could probably put it together with close supervison.

Chris Henschke

post-671-1177935975.jpg

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It would be very hard to determine what type of hut it was with just that description. There were many variants. One was the 'Amiens Hut' used from about late 1916 onwards, corrugated iron walls with a sailcloth roof. Women could probably put it together with close supervison.

Chris Henschke

Thanks Chris

That sounds possible as the word appears to start with an 'A'.

Cheers

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I've been having an off-list discussion about huts [sad life :unsure: ] and I think it was the hut designed by Walter George Tarrant that was put together in England by women workers before going to France. Terry Reeves sent me a link about Tarrant and his hut, but I can't make it work at present - perhaps when Terry's back he'll be able to add more.

Sue

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Women could probably put it together with close supervison.
:lol:
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I've been having an off-list discussion about huts [sad life :unsure: ] and I think it was the hut designed by Walter George Tarrant that was put together in England by women workers before going to France. Terry Reeves sent me a link about Tarrant and his hut, but I can't make it work at present - perhaps when Terry's back he'll be able to add more.

Sue

Thanks Sue

That may hold the key.

They were being assembled at 5 Stationary Hospital at Dieppe when Elsie described them.

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Ann

I eventually found the link to Tarrant, originally sent to me by Terry:

Elmbridge Museum

But seeing your last post, there was also the 'Adrian' hut, widely used on hospital sites, and designed by Frenchman, Auguste-Louis Adrian [that was also information from Terry]. We were both interested in the suggestion in the link above that women went to France to put huts together, which always seemed a non-starter, but your letter shows that they were partially constructed by the women in England, and then just finished off in France, which is much more likely and really useful to know.

Sue

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Ann

Dear Sue

A big thank you to you (and Terry) - so it was Adrian huts! Over 200 pages of diary and it was the last word to be confirmed! Thank you very much.

Yes, my reading of the passage is also that they were pre fabbed in Britain by women workers to be assembled in France. She makes no comment about women assembling them and I think she would had that been the case at the hospital as she does remark anpit the WAAC and their work at other times.

Thanks again for everyone's help.

JRichards

I eventually found the link to Tarrant, originally sent to me by Terry:

Elmbridge Museum

But seeing your last post, there was also the 'Adrian' hut, widely used on hospital sites, and designed by Frenchman, Auguste-Louis Adrian [that was also information from Terry]. We were both interested in the suggestion in the link above that women went to France to put huts together, which always seemed a non-starter, but your letter shows that they were partially constructed by the women in England, and then just finished off in France, which is much more likely and really useful to know.

Sue

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