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Remembered Today:

insignia of rank


BruceD

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Could someone please help with a question of insignia of rank that appear on my grandfather's uniform during WW1?

In a photograph showing him with my grandmother and a baby, presumeably my mother, born 14th August 1914, the day he was wounded, he is in a uniform with no obvious badges indicating regiment or rank. he has no headgear and the only ornamentation appers to be a plaited light coloured (white?) lanyard on the left shoulder. What might be the significance of this? He was not in any way concerned with horses ... cavalry, transport or otherwise so that connection can be rulled out.

I have researched Canadian uniform in a different connection and learned that a White lanyard was worn by soldiers of the CEF in 1915.

On another photograph he is wearing a Glengarry with a large cap badge that could well be that of the Black Watch, his regiment. On his left (the only visible) sleve is the single stripe of a Lance Corporal in the usual place. On the cuff is a sergeant's triple stripe with the point upward and there is apparently a white, vertical line through the apex of this chevron with what appears to be two crossed flags above.

In a still later photo he is wearing trousers but the tunic is cut away at the front to clear the sporran if a kilt was worn. By this time he is wearing a Balmoral bonnet and the cap badge is not clear. He has the tripple stripe this time on his upper arm, apex down, but still with the white vertical stripe and crossed flags.

Could the crossede flags feature have indicated a signaller? Prior to call-up in 1914 my grandfather was a reservist and worked in the Post Office where he was at one time a telegraphist. I know he was fluent in Morse and knew semaphore.

Any guidance will be greatfully appreciated.

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Welcome aboard, Bruce. There are a lot of experts on this Forum, but I'll start by asking if you can post scans of the pictures: that would make identification much simpler and surer.

I'd guess that 'inverted' chevrons might be long service badges; these would disappear if he was promted to Sergeant, as ranks above corporal didn't have them.

The flags would indicate a signaller, almost certainly, but the significance of placement varies. I think (emphasise think!) that the falgs on the upper arm indicate instructor status - but i could be wrong.

Someone will know more, but if you can scan and post the pictures you'd be doing everyone a favour!

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Just as Steven says. A long service signaller who was promoted to signals sergeant. The lanyard may have had significance unknown to me but it could have had a jack knife on the other end, an essential tool to a signaller.

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On his left (the only visible) sleve is the single stripe of a Lance Corporal in the usual place. On the cuff is a sergeant's triple stripe with the point upward and there is apparently a white, vertical line through the apex of this chevron with what appears to be two crossed flags above.

In a still later photo he is wearing trousers but the tunic is cut away at the front to clear the sporran if a kilt was worn. By this time he is wearing a Balmoral bonnet and the cap badge is not clear. He has the tripple stripe this time on his upper arm, apex down, but still with the white vertical stripe and crossed flags.

Bruce,

The 'white' vertical stripe on the left cuff is probable a wound stripe a gold coloured stripe introduced in July 1916 one for each occasion on which a soldier was wounded. A photo with a good example can be found on this thread http://1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/i...hl=wound+stripe

Peter

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Thanks everyone for a propt an informed reply. I have been on a forum for many years that does not permit attachments so I never thought of adding a picture.

Here are two:

1) Grandfather as part of a group estimated to be about 1916/17. Sailor inbackground is his brother-in-law. This shows insigna in left cuff.

post-20406-1176150579.jpg

2)Grandfather possibly after hostilities ceased. Other members of family at this time are out of uniform. This shows insignia in the 'normal' position.

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Second picture seems to have failed, but what is in the one attached matches what the previous members speculated - working up his left sleeve:

One wound stripe

Three long service/good conduct stripes

One Signaller qualification badge

One Lance Corporal rank chevron

And he does seem to be wearing the Black Watch cap badge.

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post-20406-1176671545.jpgTom,

The signaler, subject of this communication, is John Morrison Easton creditied (in a book published in Forfar in 1922) with some 17 years service though I suspect that much of this was in the Territorial Army and as a Reservist ... he was mobilised with about 10 others in the local Poast Office at the outbreak of WW1.

The Seaman behind is his brother-in-law, William Walker. I know nothing of his wartime service as he was barely old enough for active service in 1914 so I suspect the photo was taken when some of the family happened to be in the same place in 1915 or later.

Here is a second attempt at the picture that failed. I reckon that this was taken after the war was over. Another person in a series of pictures in the same location is already in civies and it is probable that my grandfather was home on leave pending discharge. He is obviously not on duty with a cigarette between his fingers. The car, incedentally, is a Rolls Royce ... not his! I suspect it belonged to his cousin who had a local garage and hire firm and had taken the family for an outing to celebrate the homecoming.

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Here is a second attempt at the picture that failed. I reckon that this was taken after the war was over. Another person in a series of pictures in the same location is already in civies and it is probable that my grandfather was home on leave pending discharge. He is obviously not on duty with a cigarette between his fingers. The car, incedentally, is a Rolls Royce ... not his! I suspect it belonged to his cousin who had a local garage and hire firm and had taken the family for an outing to celebrate the homecoming.

He has medal ribbons up above his left pocket, which would support a late or most likely post-war date.

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post-20406-1176671545.jpgTom,

The signaler, subject of this communication, is John Morrison Easton creditied (in a book published in Forfar in 1922) with some 17 years service though I suspect that much of this was in the Territorial Army and as a Reservist ... he was mobilised with about 10 others in the local Poast Office at the outbreak of WW1.

Here is a second attempt at the picture that failed. I reckon that this was taken after the war was over.

Your man is an Assistant Instructor, Signalling.

His three Good Conduct Badges denote 12 years regular service ...... there appears to be no authorisation for TF or SR in this period.

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