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Remembered Today:

Name back to front on the CWGC.


Tony Lund
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I have mentioned this man on the Forum before; I used to believe that the war memorial had his name back to front but now I have more information and have found a second memorial that names him I believe it is the CWGC and Soldiers Died that are in error.

He is named as Battye Booth on the CWGC, but he is named on the 1901 census as six year old Booth Battye at Fulstone, this is just next to New Mill.

He is named as Booth Battye on two local memorials, the Holme, Holmfirth and New Mill War Memorial: Fulstone section, and the New Mill Parish Church Memorial.

Mic also confirms he is named Booth Battye. But Soldiers Died agrees with the CWGC and calls him Battye Booth. The Mic, Soldiers Died and the CWGC all agree his number is 79609. The Holmfirth Express and his own family refer to him as Booth Battye. But the CWGC also refer to his mother as Mrs Sarah Battye Booth.

BOOTH BATTYE was a Private (79609), 1st 7th Battalion, Durham Light Infantry, who

died in a prisoner of war camp in Germany on Tuesday 29th October 1918 .

Born at Huddersfield he was a twenty-six year old single man who lived with his sister Mrs. Edinburgh. He was employed as a weaver with Graham & Potts Limited, at Kirkbridge Mills, it was the only job he had ever had.

He enlisted at Halifax and was reported missing after action on the 27th May 1918, a friend wrote that he and another missing man might be together, saying:

“It is more than probable he is a prisoner, for on the 27th the Germans worked through the flanks, and they were in dug-outs at the time; so it looked as though they were hemmed in, and for the most part taken prisoner. Thus it is just possible that they are both together. At all events, we sincerely hope so.”

On July 20th 1918 the Holmfirth Express appealed to the troops for information on Booth Battye who was reported as missing after action on the 27th May 1918, he was serving with the 1st 7th Battalion, Durham Light Infantry. His brother Fred Battye who was also serving with the Durham Light Infantry, was captured on April 9th and was also a prisoner in Germany.

As late as January 1919 his sister was still appealing for information through the pages of the Holmfirth Express. On January 11th she wrote:

“If any readers who have been prisoners in Germany, especially those who were attached to the camp at Worms on Rhine, could give anything as to the whereabouts of Pte. Booth Battye, 79609, 7th Durham Light Infantry (Pioneers). It would be very gratefully received by his sister, Mrs. G.W. Edinburgh, 33 Green Hill Bank Road, New Mill, Huddersfield.”

He is buried at Worms (Hochheim Hill) Cemetery, Worms, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany.

I am now recording him as Booth Battye in line with local information. I have no doubt the correct family name is Battye, but I can see why there would be confusion.

Tony.

CWGC

MIC

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CWGC has confirmed that all their records have him as Battye BOOTH. GRO has him as Booth BATTYE.

This is possible if he reversed his name for military service - Booth possibly being more acceptable than Battye? CWGC records the names as they were known in the military and would have it this way round if that was the case.

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CWGC has confirmed that all their records have him as Battye BOOTH. GRO has him as Booth BATTYE.

This is possible if he reversed his name for military service - Booth possibly being more acceptable than Battye? CWGC records the names as they were known in the military and would have it this way round if that was the case.

The MIC would indicate that the military had him down as Booth Battye, and not as reported by CWGC.

Andy

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Now that I am coming towards the end of a long period of collecting information relating to the Holmfirth men it is almost inevitable that some interesting questions should be left.

I now know that Booth Battye was born at New Mill in the March quarter of 1895. His birth is registered at Huddersfield. I can get his birth certificate if it would be of any use.

Personally I don’t think it matters about every little detail on the register being correct but I think the name should right. The question is whether this is something that should be left alone or would it help to get that certificate?

Tony.

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Tony

In the ordinary course of things, I'd have said that CWGC got it wrong - but SDGW confirms it. Perhaps you need to see if his papers remain at Kew and see if they sort out where the confusion lies.

It is possible that he simply preferred it that way round, but I somehow doubt it. I take it "batty" is used on your side of the Pennines as it is on mine as in "daft". It doesnt seem likely that you'd reinvent yourself as a figure of fun as "Daft Booth".

John

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Even though the MIC has the name one way, SDGW has it the other way - and SDGW was compiled by the regiment. So you would have expected them to get it right.

I would get the death certificate to make a case for it being Booth Battye (though the army supplied the info for that as well!!!!). His reference number is I.36.21.

If you only had the birth certificate, you would have to prove that it was the same man as the one in the army. The overseas death certificate will do this for you as it bears the military details.

The main problem is that the name has been confirmed by the relatives in CWGC records as Battye Booth (twice).

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It is possible that he simply preferred it that way round, but I somehow doubt it. I take it "batty" is used on your side of the Pennines as it is on mine as in "daft". It doesnt seem likely that you'd reinvent yourself as a figure of fun as "Daft Booth".

John

I hadn’t thought of that but it is correct. Batty = daft over this side as well.

The Holmfirth Battye’s are Battye with an E on the end and this is the least common form of the surname. There were eleven of them from Holmfirth killed and a few survivors as well. One day I would like to go through the film and see what records are left for all of them with that surname, there are not all that many of them. But that cannot be for a while yet. Fortunately there is no need to rush here.

The main problem is that the name has been confirmed by the relatives in CWGC records as Battye Booth (twice).

This is puzzling, but hopefully it will become clear eventually. Thanks for the information.

Tony.

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I came across two more newspaper references to Booth Battye being missing yesterday. I shall have to leave this one until other things have been dealt with, but I am pretty sure the local sources have it right with this name.

Tony.

This is just a thought, but he was a prisoner so if all else fails the Red Cross should have a record of him with number and battalion and regiment.

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  • 3 weeks later...

And another report:

Holmfirth Express October 19th 1918.

“Mrs. G. W. Edinburgh of Greenhill Bank Road, New Mill, has received a postcard from the British Red Cross Society, stating that her brother Private Booth Battye, 1st 7th Durham Light Infantry, (Pioneers) is a prisoner of war. The message also states that Booth is well, but the camp is not indicated. This soldier was reported missing on May 27th. Another of Mrs. Edinburgh’s brothers, Private Fred Battye, is also a prisoner of war. From him a letter was received recently stating that he was “in the pink and the best of spirits.” He says there are only 18 prisoners in the camp where he is stationed, and two of them come from Halifax - the nearest place to his home.”

Tony.

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  • 2 months later...

I have just come across three more references to Booth Battye 79609, 7th Durham Light Infantry. Also his parents were surnamed Battye and his grandfather was called Booth Battye. I think I will see if his service papers survived. I might be lucky.

I know his parents passed the CWGC information, but my grandfather was in this war and his mother signed his birth certificate with an X. So is it perhaps possible that Booth Battye’s parents sent in or agreed with wrong information that they perhaps could not read properly?

Tony.

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  • 1 year later...

According to the Holmfirth Express Booth Battye lived with his sister Mrs. G. W. Edinburgh, at 33 Greenhill Bank Road, New Mill. I know his papers have not survived.

As late as January 1919 his sister was still appealing for information through the pages of the Holmfirth Express. On January 11th she wrote:

“If any readers who have been prisoners in Germany, especially those who were attached to the camp at Worms on Rhine, could give anything as to the whereabouts of Pte. Booth Battye, 79609, 1st 7th Durham Light Infantry (Pioneers). It would be very gratefully received by his sister, Mrs. G. W. Edinburgh, 33 Green Hill Bank Road, New Mill, Huddersfield.”

At the end of February 1919 Mrs. Edinburgh received news from the war office that her brother Private Booth Battye had died on October 29th 1918 and was buried at Hochhein Cemetery at Worms, Germany.

The CWGC list him as Battye Booth, the son of Edward and Sarah Battye Booth, of 33, Green Hill, Bank Rd, New Mill, Huddersfield.

His bother Fred Battye (who was also a prisoner in Germany after he was captured on April 9th, 1918) who was serving with the Durham Light Infantry, also lived with his sister, Mrs. G. W. Edinburgh, but in his case his papers did survive.

So it can be proved that Fred Battye lived at the address given by the CWGC for Private Battye Booth, but nothing more positive than a few newspaper reports calling him Private Booth Battye have come to light yet.

I remain convinced that this man’s name has been recorded the wrong way around, and it is a pity his papers did not survive, but maybe something more will come up eventually.

There is no Battye Booth named on the 1901 census, but Booth Battye is named twice. One at 41 years old and one at 6 years old, both living at Fulstone. Fulstone is an old electoral district which today is more commonly known as New Mill.

Tony.

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The FreeBMD website has the following record of his birth:

Surname: Battye

First name:Booth

March Quarter 1895

District: Huddersfield

Volume: 9a

Page: 288

Regards,

Martin

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Mic confirms he is named Booth Battye, as does two local memorials, the Holme, Holmfirth and New Mill War Memorial: Fulstone section, and the New Mill Parish Church Memorial.

Plus he is named Booth Battye in approximately six newspaper reports, mostly after he went missing, and usually asking the troops if they know anything about his whereabouts. Some of these reports give the same number, battalion and regiment as the man named Battye Booth on the CWGC.

He is Battye Booth on CWGC and Soldiers Died.

Tony.

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