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Remembered Today:

regiment from uniform?


tradguide
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Is it possible to tell what Regiment my grandfather was in from his uniforn? All I know is that he was a Sapper in the Royal Engineers. I think I have his Medal Card details but cannot be certain. Thanks.

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Hi

Look like R.E.s

Hi

Yes he was in the Royal Engineers but I hoped someone may be able to tell me more from his uniform, ie. which section / division etc. as I am new to this research.

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There are some fiendishly clever (some just plain fiendish :ph34r: ) people on this site but I don't think you will get any more from this photo. Click on the 'Long Long Trail' lead at the top of this site and you will get lots of info to get you started.

Cheers,

Ian

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There are some fiendishly clever (some just plain fiendish :ph34r: ) people on this site but I don't think you will get any more from this photo. Click on the 'Long Long Trail' lead at the top of this site and you will get lots of info to get you started.

Cheers,

Ian

Many thanks Ian but already 'been there, done that'. Maybe I've reached that brick wall, sooner than later. Oh well! Life's not always easy.

Cheers.

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Hi

Try posting his MIC you may have more luck

As I am new to all this research I'm afraid to admit that I do not know what a MIC is. Please could you enlighten me? :unsure:

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As I am new to all this research I'm afraid to admit that I do not know what a MIC is. Please could you enlighten me? :unsure:

MIC stands for Medal Index Card

Red

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There have always been two schools of thought about lacing - the type shown is much easier to cut when removing a boot from a casualty although the version with laces at right angles to the eyeholes is deemed smarter

Stephen

(current fashion is to cross laces)

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There have always been two schools of thought about lacing - the type shown is much easier to cut when removing a boot from a casualty although the version with laces at right angles to the eyeholes is deemed smarter

Stephen

(current fashion is to cross laces)

I'd not even looked at his laces. I must take after my granddad.

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Guest KevinEndon

Laces were tied without a bow.

A knot was tied in one end and threaded through the bottom loop left hand side from the inside to the outside and then passed to the bottom loop right then over to the second eye left side then over to the second eye right side and so on up to the top of the boot.

The single end was then passed round the boot, a loop was made and the end passed through the loop then pulled tight. The remainder of the lace was wrapped around the boot until a little piece was left which was tucked inside the lace. And there you have it the bowless lace.

I thank you lol.

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Laces were tied without a bow.

A knot was tied in one end and threaded through the bottom loop left hand side from the inside to the outside and then passed to the bottom loop right then over to the second eye left side then over to the second eye right side and so on up to the top of the boot.

The single end was then passed round the boot, a loop was made and the end passed through the loop then pulled tight. The remainder of the lace was wrapped around the boot until a little piece was left which was tucked inside the lace. And there you have it the bowless lace.

I thank you lol.

I'll have to try it with my walking boots! Thanks for the instructions.

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