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Rob Bulloch

Thomas. Wynne. Davies.

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Rob Bulloch

I am searching for details on Private Thomas, Wynne. Davies. The Welsh Regiment, I have his Memorial Plaque and Photographs, I looked for him on the CWGC. but could not come up with his name. could someone on the Forum who has the SDGW programe please look up this soldier for me, thanks in advance.

Regards Rob. Bulloch.

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Guest Hill 60

60514 Private Thomas Wynne Davies

16th Battalion, Welsh Regiment

Born: Chester

Enlisted: Glasgow

KIA: 27/8/17

F&F

Hope this helps.

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Rob Bulloch

Lee.

Thanks very much for the information. have you any idea why he would end up in a Welsh regiment when he enlisted in Glasgow, or was this quite common, by his name alone I would have imagined him enlisting in Wales.

Thanks Again, Rob Bulloch,

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bydand

I found him mentioned on the Roll of Honour of the Citizens of Glasgow Who Died in the Great War and found him listed as living at :

80 New City Road, Cowcaddens.

Neil Drysdale

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Guest Hill 60

Rob - He might have requested to serve in a Welsh regiment, or it was coincidence!

Other, more experianced people on the Forum (Paul Reed HINT HINT) will know more!

I had a Great Uncle who, admittedly in WWII, who was born and lived in Middlesex but ended up in a Territorial unit of the Suffolk Regiment.

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Terry Denham

Rob

Pte Thomas Wynne Davies is included on the CWGC Internet database.

The entry adds the following info to that given by Lee & Neil above -

Age 34. Son of Samuel & Annie Davies of Chester. Husband of Elizabeth Davies of 80 New City Road, Glasgow.

Buried in Cement House Cemetery, Belgium. Grave VIII.C.2

Chester is very close to the Welsh border & so he presumably had an affinity or connections to that country. Perhaps his parents were Welsh?

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Myrtle

Rob,

I agree with Terry that your soldier may have had connections with Wales such as Welsh parentage (especially with the names Wynne Davies), but as Chester is very close to the border of North Wales I find it unusual that he should join a regiment that tended to recruit men from South Wales. If he had not been transferred from another regiment and his connections had been with North Wales then I would have expected him to have joined the RWF.

Regards

Myrtle

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Rob Bulloch

Many thanks to all who replied to my posting,on doing a re-check on the listing on the CWGC 60514 Thomas Davies I did find a listing to this soldier but his middle name is listed as "Wayne" not "Wynne" Will this be a typo, I did see this name the first time I checked the listing, Thanks again.

Rob Bulloch.

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Terry Denham

Rob

The name error on the CWGC site is probably a typo or scanning error. I don't think 'Wayne' was a very popular name in the 19th century when this chap was born!

Unfortunately, the Cement House register in my collection is one of the newer computer-produced variety and so I cannot tell if this is a recent error or one that has existed since the 1920s.

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Rob Bulloch

Terry,

Thanks for the information it will allow me to get on with my project, thanks again to the members of the Forum for all your in-put.

Rob Bulloch.

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Tom Morgan

It wasn't uncommon for soldiers to have served in a regiment which appears to have little geographical connection with the areas in which they were born, lived or enlisted.

Early in the war, during the first period of voluntary enlistment in 1914 and 1915, volunteers had a certain amount of freedom as to which Regiment they joined, and Martin Middlebrook details quite a few examples in "The First Day on the Somme." The one I remember best is the man who asked to be sent to a particular regiment because it gave him the longest train-ride at a time when people didn't travel far from home.

Another very common reason was that wounded soldiers, when they had recovered and were fit for active service again, were often sent to regiments which needed them following some action involving heavy casualties. There are lots of examples of this kind of thing.

And, especially later in the war, soldiers who had completed their training and were ready to be sent overseas often found that they were suddenly transferred, often in large numbers, to quite different battalions which needed reinforcements following heavy losses. This happened to Dr. Norman Gladden, who mentions in his memoirs how he, a Londoner, suddenly found himself a member of the Northumberland Fusiliers, and was quite unable to understand what his fellow-soldiers were saying.

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Michael

A chap from my village enlisted in the Notts & Derby Regiment at Herne Bay, which is in North East Kent. I guess the regiment was posted to the area. We had the Middlesex and Dublin Fusiliers in our locality for some time.

Michael

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Conor Dodd

Michael do you know of any Dublin Fusiliers in your locality and if you do ,do you have any information on them addresses etc. ?

Conor :)

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Michael

Conor

I mentioned previously that I would look out for the Royal Dublin Fusiliers in the East Kent Gazette. I was in the library last week and found the following snippets which might interest you.

January 8 1916

"Second Lieutenant C McBride Broun, 6th Royal Dublin Fusiliers, reported missing, believed killed in the Balkans, was the second son of Capt William Brown, retired Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company, of Coulston Park Road Beckenham, and was 21 years of age. He was formerly of the cadet ship Worcester and Devitt & Moore's sailing ship Medway.In 1911 he went to Ceylon and was engaged in rubber planting. When war broke out he left for Egypt with the Ceylon Planters' contingent and was given a commission in the 3rd Australian Reinforcements. Subsequently he joined the 6th RDF"

January 22 1916

An article describing how the Royal Dublin Fusiliers left on the Wednesday. There were a throng of people at the station to wave them off. They left from Gore Court Camp [sittingbourne]. There was no mention of which battalion it was but it would appear that they were well appreciated in the area.

I'll keep looking for you

Regards

Michael

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