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Remembered Today:

Hoge


Guest Simon Bull
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Guest Simon Bull

In the process of planning a battlefield tour I have been studying various maps of Belgium and noticing how frequently Hoge crops up on maps, either on its own or as part of a place name.

Could one of our Dutch speakers please tell me what Hoge means?

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Not sure if this is waht you want, Simon, but 'Hooge' I believe means 'high'. I asked our B&B host at Ieper last weekend, and he said it was 'high', but - he said - 'the old spelling'. Might apply to Hoge, too?

BTW - I suppose 'high' is relative.

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According to the "babelfish" translator, it is "high" in Dutch. Perhaps "hooge" is the Flemish dialect.

The question now is how to pronounce it correctly.

John

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According to the "babelfish" translator, it is "high" in Dutch. Perhaps "hooge" is the Flemish dialect.

The question now is how to pronounce it correctly.

John

Well, dear old Andre was a bit, shall we say, guttural....."Hocker", with a throat noise on the "ck" bit is the best I could do as a description, and "o" quite long.

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Guest Simon Bull

Well I was guessing in totally the wrong direction! Don't ask me why, but I had begun to suspect it might mean ditch or moat!

Thanks Pals!

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dear pals,

hoog : means high.

HIGH ın the mountains : HOOG in de bergen ...

hoge : is the adjective :

This is a HIGH mountain : Dit is een hoge berg ...

pronounciation (official "Nederlands") : Use the HO of Hole and the G .... well it's a special G ... which only exists in Flemish, Arabic and propably a number of other languages unknow to me ...

eric

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dear pals,

hoog : means high.

HIGH ın the mountains : HOOG in de bergen ...

hoge : is the adjective :

This is a HIGH mountain : Dit is een hoge berg ...

pronounciation (official "Nederlands") : Use the HO of Hole and the G .... well it's a special G ... which only exists in Flemish, Arabic and propably a number of other languages unknow to me ...

eric

Very similar then to hoch in German. " Hande hoch!". ( I have no umlaut ).

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no,no,no,no,no ...yes

exactly the "ch" is very simular to our "g"

eric

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. ( I have no umlaut ).

I used to, but the handles fell off. Blasted Russian cars :angry:

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I used to, but the handles fell off. Blasted Russian cars :angry:

Thank you for the sympathy. To make matters worse, I have no cedilla either. I hope your legs get better soon. :)

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Thank you for the sympathy. To make matters worse, I have no cedilla either. I hope your legs get better soon. :)

Well since the handles fell off my umlaut, the legs are getting more use than they ought to get. :angry:

Sorry to hear about the cedilla; the same thing happened to an aunt of mine, so we had to have her painlessly destroyed. It was the kindest way.

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....................

the same thing happened to an aunt of mine, so we had to have her painlessly destroyed.

........................

HMMMMMMMMMMM..................painless for who I ask myself.

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HMMMMMMMMMMM..................painless for who I ask myself.

Half a bottle of gin and she knew nothing about it.

Mind you, I barked my shin on the trap door....should have rolled my trousers down.

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Half a bottle of gin and she knew nothing about it.

Mind you, I barked my shin on the trap door....should have rolled my trousers down.

Which brings us neatly back on topic. Belgium is next door to Holland where gin came from.

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It's all Dutch to me (sorry, someone had to say it :ph34r: )

Take the German "hoch" then move a little closer to the UK for Belgian/Dutch "Ho(o)ge"....... and the English is "high"... me thinks there be a pattern here. Didn't we nick the odd word from our European cousins?

Les

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"Didn't we nick the odd word from our European cousins?"

or did we from you ???

All three languages (German-Dutch/Flemish-English) are of the Germanic branch of the Indo_European family.

eric

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It's all Dutch to me (sorry, someone had to say it :ph34r: )

Take the German "hoch" then move a little closer to the UK for Belgian/Dutch "Ho(o)ge"....... and the English is "high"... me thinks there be a pattern here. Didn't we nick the odd word from our European cousins?

Les

These vowel shifts have long been recognised and documented. Fascinating subject if you like that sort of thing.

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Some replies were indeed pretty close to the correct pronunciation of "Hoge".

But to make matters more complicated : don't be surprised when coming to the area when you hear us locals pronounce it in a totally different way. For (in our dialect) we in Ypres (and all of the Province of West-Flanders) do not pronounce the -h-, also pronounce the -g- as ... -h- (as a matter of fact 99% of us cannot pronounce the -g- as it should be done in standard Dutch), and most of us pronounce the -o- in this word not as a monophthong, but as a diphthong (of which it is totally impossible to represent the pronunciation in normal spelling without using phonetical symbols).

Good luck.

And Hooge or Hooghe indeed is the old spelling (pre-WW2)

Aurel

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Some replies were indeed pretty close to the correct pronunciation of "Hoge".

But to make matters more complicated : don't be surprised when coming to the area when you hear us locals pronounce it in a totally different way. For (in our dialect) we in Ypres (and all of the Province of West-Flanders) do not pronounce the -h-, also pronounce the -g- as ... -h- (as a matter of fact 99% of us cannot pronounce the -g- as it should be done in standard Dutch), and most of us pronounce the -o- in this word not as a monophthong, but as a diphthong (of which it is totally impossible to represent the pronunciation in normal spelling without using phonetical symbols).

Good luck.

And Hooge or Hooghe indeed is the old spelling (pre-WW2)

Aurel

Well, thanks for clearing that up, then :huh:

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Dear Aurel,

I didn't venture into mentioning here that our Dutch friends have a different pronounciation of the "g" and certainly not what would be left of Hoog/Hoge (as mentioned above) if pronounced in any of the Flemish dialects ...

For an outsider it must look very confusing ... and they might think we ALL speak 3 languages by birth : our dialect, Flemish and Dutch ....

eric

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Seriously, I was intrigued to learn recently (on the famed F Troop trip), that Belgium also has a German-speaking enclave. How difficult it must be to run a country with three languages - two sounded complex enough, but three sounds all-but impossible.

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