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Andrew Hesketh

Sherwood Foresters & Easter Rising

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Tim1915

Andrew thank you for the links.

I contacted the MOD in Middlesex regarding my Grandfather and Great Uncle.

They sent me the whole file they had in respect of my Great Uncle, just three pages.

I attach the appropriate part of one of the pages.

It does not say that much.

If it is not legible, I will happily email you a higher definition scan off Forum.

Do you know of the other men mentioned (Captain Jackson, Lt Brown and I can't decipher the last name)?

Regards,

Tim

post-1785-1133209163.jpeg

post-1785-1133209173.jpeg

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mikebriggs

Dear All

Whilst we are on this subject please find enclosed an interesting photo of the Sherwoods Foresters attacking 25 Northumberland Street (by Mount Street Bridge) and insert the house today with plaque to Michael Molone one of the defenders.

Of course the photo is not real but a still from a 1966 film commemorating the Easter Rising.

If you get to Dublin then you should check out the Mount Street Bridge and it becomes clear why the Foresters suffered so many casualties. The whole area is exposed and subject to fire from the houses and School on either side. In fact the old school is now a bar and as you are sipping that cool pint of Guiness take a look at the ceiling and you can still see the bullet holes!

Can send a better pictue if any one interested. Also have some of the Jail where the men where shot. They are in a 1916-1966 Commemorative Book (that I paid way too much for several years ago)

post-4619-1133210610.jpg

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Tim1915

Mike,

I would very much like a higher definition copy of the photograph.

Please would you email it to me off Forum?

Regards,

Tim

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mikebriggs

yes of course - how do I do it? - can't seem to find any instructions on the help menu.

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mikebriggs

By the way Captain Jackson was Officer Commanding C Company 2/6th Battn during the Easter Rising.

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wig

The report I have is the manuscript of a memior by Capt A.A. Dickson. It was obviously written after the war and it records his whole war service from being accepted for O.T.C. in 1914, failing the medical and joining the Inns of Court regiment, then being commissioned into the SF in 1916 and being sent with his btn. to Dublin.

He writes extensively about Dublin and Ireland. He was in the thick of the fighting around Mount Street Bridge. Unfortunatley his memory for place names is not so good. For example, as a subaltern he is placed in command of an execution squad. 12 men and himself. He marches them off to Mountjoy jail to carry out the executions. Of course all the Dublin executions were carried out at Kilmainham jail.

He also writes about SF after the rising including a very nice spell of duty down at the Galway races!. He eventualy returns to England and is then sent to France where he fought with the SF at Poperinghe,Nieuport,La Bassee before being wounded at Gommecourt. He was demobbed in 1919 hile at Brocton Staffs.

Despite his poor recall of the placenames in Dublin this is obviously the real thing. A bit too long to post I'm afraid.

wig

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Andrew Hesketh

Wig (John),

I've contacted you off forum, but I believe that public thanks for your help is merited. Thanks!

Mike,

I don't suppose you know Capt. Jackson's christian name(s) do you? It's a long shot, but if it's John William Jackson then I'm going to be a splendidly surprised and very happy bunny. :P

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mikebriggs

Andrew:

Unfortnately I don't know what his name is. However a certain Henry Humphrey Jackson was promoted to 2/Lt in 1913 (he was the sone of a former comanding Officer) but he sailed with the 6/SF to France in 1915. He was later promoted to Captain, but I don't know whether he was sent back to England and posted to 2/6th.

Wig:

If there was a chance of you sending a photocopy of the manuscript (or at least the part that deals with F & F) I would be very grateful and naturally cover any costs incurred.

Also:

I have a copy (about 7 pages A3) of the 2/6th History in Ireland - quite a lot of detail - happy to send copies (probably too big to scan but could try) - let me know if you are interested

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Andrew Hesketh
Also:

I have a copy (about 7 pages A3) of the 2/6th History in Ireland - quite a lot of detail - happy to send copies (probably too big to scan but could try) - let me know if you are interested

Mike - that would be great! Let me know if scanning is too much of a problem and if it is I'll send you the postage.

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AGWR

Andrew,

I spoke to that chap at the weekend. It was the 2/6th Bn.

Regards,

AGWR

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Andrew Hesketh

AGWR,

Thanks for that. I think there is now enough evidence to confirm beyond doubt that men from the 2/6th carried out some of the executions.

To all,

This thread has developed brilliantly and is shining a light into a murky episode. Thank you for all your contributions - and please keep 'em coming!

Edited by Andrew Hesketh

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mikebriggs

Found the guy!

William Brabazon Mather Jackson

b. 7/10/1893 in London. Educated privately.

Commisioned into 6th Sherwood Foresters in 1911.

Lt 17.12.13; T/Capt 17.11.14

During the Great War he served in Ireland during the Easter Rising of 1916

Returned to France in Feb 1917 and died of wounds 28.4.17

I would assume that Lt Brown might have been in charge of a platoon

The other name looks like Major Lomas (or Thomas) to me??

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AGWR

Apparently, one of the SF officers had previously sent his wife and child to Dublin because he was worried about Zeppelin raids. He met his wife in the street shortly after landing in Ireland. Within a few hours he was dead. I vaguely recall reading about this incident in one of the battalion histories. Has anyone else come across this story? If not, I will try to dig out his name and post further details.

Regards,

AGWR

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AGWR

Wig,

Yes, that's the chap. Thanks for the link.

Regards,

AGWR

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wig
Andrew:

Unfortnately I don't know what his name is. However a certain Henry Humphrey Jackson was promoted to 2/Lt in 1913 (he was the sone of a former comanding Officer) but he sailed with the 6/SF to France in 1915. He was later promoted to Captain, but I don't know whether he was sent back to England and posted to 2/6th.

Wig:

If there was a chance of you sending a photocopy of the manuscript (or at least the part that deals with F & F) I would be very grateful and naturally cover any costs incurred.

Also:

I have a copy (about 7 pages A3) of the 2/6th History in Ireland - quite a lot of detail - happy to send copies (probably too big to scan but could try) - let me know if you are interested

I need an address......

wig

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Tim1915

Mike,

I have sent an email to you via your web-site. Many thanks for your kind offer.

I must say I think this thread is fascinating. Thanks to all who have contributed.

Regards,

Tim

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Andrew Hesketh
William Brabazon Mather Jackson

Well done Mike. Another piece of the jigsaw slots into place.

Sadly though, I do not get to do happy bunny impressions this evening. :(

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BatterySergeantMajor

Michael Malone. His brother died in '15 at Mouse Trap farm.

Erwinpost-2820-1133299628.jpg

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wig

I came across another interesting insight into the Sherwoods in Dublin, as follows:

A Captain E. Gerrard, probably an artillary officer, found himself at Beggers Bush Barracks, which are quite close to the Mount St Bridge area where the slaughter took place. The Sherwoods he encounterd during that period did not impress him and he complained of the qulaity of the troops

"The young Sherwoods that I had with me had never fired a service rifle before. jThey were not even able to load them. We had to show them how to load them"

Later on he describes them as "untrained, undersized products of the English slums"

Taken from his statement made by him after the rising and held in the Bureau of Military History.

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matteyre

Fascinating topic/thread. Is there any reference to 2nd Lt Arthur Noel Eyre, 6th Sherwoods/57 squadron RFC, killed 26/9/1918 shot down over Cambrai?Have sent you an e mail Andrew, perhaps he could be added to the roll of honour on your derbyshire lads site, thanks, matt

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irishmen1916

Just came across this thread, I dont think that all the Executions at Kilmainham Gaol where carried out by the SF, I have seen a number of 1916 execution record's which became available in 1992 from Kew which are signed by the officers who overseen the executions, and they where RIR.

Peter

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archangel9

And from Liams post -

'Yes, I was there. As a matter of fact I had the job of seeing them off.' My heart pounded. Sickeningly I looked at the Irish harp on his cap badge, and I stared bitterly at his beady brown eyes.

Liam.

How many regiments in Dublin at the time had "the Irish harp" on their cap badges?

John

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Michael Pegum
And from Liams post -

How many regiments in Dublin at the time had "the Irish harp" on their cap badges?

John

There were casualties from three regiments which had the harp on their badges:

Royal Irish Regiment (casualties: killed, 1 officer, 7 O.Rs; wounded: 1 officer, 14 O.Rs.)

Royal Irish Rifles (casualties: killed, 1 officer, 9 O.Rs; wounded, 5 officers, 32 O.Rs.)

Connaught Rangers (casualties: killed, 0; wounded, 1 O.R.)

I don't know which of them had beady eyes!

Michael

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wig

Paul O'Briens definative account of the Mount Street battle and the Sherwood Foresters, see http://www.amazon.co.uk/product-reviews/18...howViewpoints=1 has been an outstanding success. He has now produced a second book following the Foresters in Dublin as they fought there way through the South Dublin Union, a poor house institution commanded by Eamonn Ceannt and a 100 Irish rebels. Ceant was subsequently executed at Kilmainham Jail by soldiers of the Sherwood foresters.

I have already read this book in manuscript form and found it an accurate fast paced account of the brutal battle that roamed through the corridors and wards of the South Dublin Union. there was valour on both sides and Paul, as always, is as fair to the Brits as he is to the Irish.

Details of the book are

UNCOMMON VALOUR

1916 & THE BATTLE FOR THE SOUTH DUBLIN UNION

PUBLISHED BY MERCIER PRESS 2010

ISBN 978 1 85635 6541

CAN BE GOT IN ALL SHOPS IN IRELAND.

AMAZON

OR MERCIER PRESS WEBSITE: http://www.mercierpress.ie/cartage.html?ma...e_alias=cartage

Anyone in Dublin on thursday night is welcome to the book's launch at Kilmainham gaol 7pm

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