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Able Seaman H G Smith


chrisharley9

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Please has anyone got any info on this chap or his ship. What is the significance of the SS & RFR service nos

Name: SMITH, HENRY GEORGE

Initials: H G

Nationality: United Kingdom

Rank: Able Seaman

Regiment: Royal Navy

Unit Text: (RFR/CH/B/5534). H.M.S. "Foyle."

Age: 34

Date of Death: 15/03/1917

Service No: SS/342

Additional information: Son of the late John and Anna Smith; husband of Alice Mary Smith, of High St., Wangford, Suffolk.

Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead

Grave/Memorial Reference: 22.

Cemetery: CHATHAM NAVAL MEMORIAL

All The Best

Chris

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HMS FOYLE, E type River Class Destroyer, 560 tons launched 25th February 1902 at Laird. Pendant Nos N44 (1914) and D20 (September 1915). Armed with 4 x 12 pounders, 2 x 18 inch Torpedo Tubes. Mined 15/3/1917 in the Dover straits.

Aye

Malcolm

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Once again my thanks Malcolm

All The Best

Chris

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Chris,

The loss of Foyle is often incorrectly attributed to a mine laid by the German submarine UC 68. What happened is that Foyle hit a mine in the Dover area and broke in two with at the bow section sinking at 51° 07'N, 01° 27'E. The Royal Navy then decided to tow the stern section to (IIRC) Devonport. She almost got there, but sank near Eddystone. UC 68 had laid mines near Eddystone... and so sometimes you get Foyle + mine hit + Eddystone = must have been UC 68 which wasn't the case.

Which vessel laid the mine that Foyle hit is uncertain at this stage. I am slowly creating a database of German minefield location so hopefully the answer will become obvious from that.

Best wishes,

Michael

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SS means Short Service; usually 5 yrs RN and 7 years RFR; introduced in 1903 to get more adult recruits joining the Navy.

The RFR prefix is his additional RFR service number. CH part means his Port Division was Chatham. I am led to believe the B part means a second engagement with the RFR (i.e. he had served with them 7yrs+).

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Thanks very much everyone

Malcolm I totally agree with you I'm always amazed

All The Best

Chris

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Hello!

According to my information, "Foyle" (Lt. A. H. D. Young, RNR) hit a mine on 15.03.1917 at 5 a.m. at 50°11'N-03°58'W.

Forepart with 27 dead sank there.

Afterpart was towed by tug "Illustrious" until 2.50 p.m., than the afterpart sank at 50°16'N-04°10'W.

Information of mining in Dover-Area maybe confused with loss of "Laforey" at 50°55,5'N-01°27,5'E just a week later (23.03.1917) !?!

Oliver

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Oliver

many thanks for that

All The Best

Chris

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