Jump to content
The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

6th Somerset Light Infantry


Chris_B
 Share

Recommended Posts

I'm interested in the fate of this man:

ERNEST ALBERT PALMER

PALMER

Initials: E A

Nationality: United Kingdom

Rank: Private

Regiment: Somerset Light Infantry

Unit Text: 6th Bn

Date of Death: 09/04/1918

Service No: 27355

Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead

Grave/Memorial Reference: II. A. 7.

Cemetery: HAUTMONT COMMUNAL CEMETERY

Died of Wounds

Born Clapham, Enlisted Mitcham

Formerly 22497 East Surrey

Pte.Palmer had been in the East Surreys, and checking the MIC index shows a number of men transferred from the East Surreys to the 6th battalion within the number range 27350-27370 (and other ranges), with the SDGW showing casualties amongst them as early as April 1917.

Any information about the 6th SLI whereabouts/actions on or around 09/04/1918 would be appreciated, as would any information about the transfers.

Thanks,

Chris.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Chris,

The key battles leading up to 9th April 1918 involving the 6th Somersets are:

21st March 1918 - 6th Battalion in front line and overrun in initial German assaults. (see the overview of the battle in the main site for general location).

24th-25th March - the remnants fought with the Scottish Rifles at Jussy where the Germans forced a crossing over the canal.

26th - 30th March retirement to Beaurains Canal, Thiescourt, Elincourt and then to Estree St Denis, then (following reformation of the battalion from 43rd Bgd pioneers, transport details and returning NCO's and men) on to Breull, Nogent and then they were bussed to Nampty.

On the 4th April 1918 the Bn was involved in operations to seize high ground 800 yards north east of Villers Bretonneux to the west of the Bois de Vaire and the Bois de Hamel.

The battalion, being so weak in numbers was amalgamated with the 5th Ox and Bucks on the 14th April.

Because he died of wounds, and because of the chaos at the time (including loss of battalion diary etc) I suspect that you will find it difficult to establish exactly what happened to Palmer - unless you are lucky enough to find a personal account.

Brendon.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Brendon,

Thanks for your information. I had picked up a few pieces from the main site and the 6th SLI get a few brief mentions in Martin Middlebrook's book "THe Kaiser's Battle".

But you are right, it doesn't very look likely that more can be known.

I did email the SLI museum on the off chance that some sort of record of casualties may have survived.

Regards,

Chris.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 years later...

Chris B,

Hi, I'm new, having just signed in to the Forum. I am also hoping to find out some details about the 6th SLI in April 1918 and will soon post a query about that. While searching the forum I came across your query about E A Palmer and where the 6th were on April 9 1918.

The 6th were at St Fuscien (4 miles S of Amiens) from 7-9 of April having been in the line at Aubigny as a brigade reserve on the 6 April. On 10 April they marched to Saleux, entrained to Gamaches then marched to Ault on the coast.

With regard to E A Palmer, from the CWGC, and your notes. I see he is buried at Hautmont and died of wounds. From the Cemetery details, I see that Hautmont is approx 50 miles NE of St Quentin on the jct of N49 and N2 and was in German hands from early in the war until Nov. 1918. The Cemetery was used by the Germans to bury both their casulties and Allied POW's who died in local German hospitals. So it is more than likely that E A Palmer was wounded and taken prisoner during some fighting well before the 6th SLI were anywhere near Amiens. The 6th retreated from St Quentin during the Ludendorf 1st offensive of March 1918 and ended up S of Amiens (Nampty) on 30th March.

My interest is that my uncle 16421 Pvt. David Adams (6th SLI) was killed at Thennes/Berteaucort-les-Thennes on 2nd April 1918 and I have copies of the war diary of the Bn. for all of March and April 1918 - my query about that will be posted shortly.

Hope the above helps.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
Chris B,

Hi, I'm new, having just signed in to the Forum. I am also hoping to find out some details about the 6th SLI in April 1918 and will soon post a query about that. While searching the forum I came across your query about E A Palmer and where the 6th were on April 9 1918.

The 6th were at St Fuscien (4 miles S of Amiens) from 7-9 of April having been in the line at Aubigny as a brigade reserve on the 6 April. On 10 April they marched to Saleux, entrained to Gamaches then marched to Ault on the coast.

With regard to E A Palmer, from the CWGC, and your notes. I see he is buried at Hautmont and died of wounds. From the Cemetery details, I see that Hautmont is approx 50 miles NE of St Quentin on the jct of N49 and N2 and was in German hands from early in the war until Nov. 1918. The Cemetery was used by the Germans to bury both their casulties and Allied POW's who died in local German hospitals. So it is more than likely that E A Palmer was wounded and taken prisoner during some fighting well before the 6th SLI were anywhere near Amiens. The 6th retreated from St Quentin during the Ludendorf 1st offensive of March 1918 and ended up S of Amiens (Nampty) on 30th March.

My interest is that my uncle 16421 Pvt. David Adams (6th SLI) was killed at Thennes/Berteaucort-les-Thennes on 2nd April 1918 and I have copies of the war diary of the Bn. for all of March and April 1918 - my query about that will be posted shortly.

Hope the above helps.

Thanks for tanking the time to make such an informative post. You given me quite a lot of detail to look at.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...