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Remembered Today:

Dark feature north of Sphinx


Skipman
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3 minutes ago, charlie962 said:

Shadow. It follows the profile of the ridge.

I thought that but there are no other areas of dark shadow?

Mike

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Direction of ridge is at right angle to sun.  Some individual objects are throwing shadows in same direction.  

Sphinx is such a dramatic projection that it produces a dramatic shadow.

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2 minutes ago, charlie962 said:

Direction of ridge is at right angle to sun.  Some individual objects are throwing shadows in same direction.  

Sphinx is such a dramatic projection that it produces a dramatic shadow.

I guess so. Just seems a bit odd.

Mike

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15 minutes ago, charlie962 said:

That water effect looks to me like a pixel distortion of dark area?

Yes thanks charlie962  it must be. I'm convinced shadow now. Have scrolled back in time and there are various lengths of shadow. It really must be quite a feature in the flesh (as it were)  Hope that's been interesting enough for folks.

Mike

 

Forum dark feature Sphinx 3.PNG

Edited by Skipman
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  • 2 weeks later...

Mike & Charlie,

This year's new 'Hidden Gallipoli' walking tour which the Gallipoli Association put on in May, in conjunction with Battle Honours Ltd., spent a day exploring one of the new pathways provided by the Turkish Gallipoli Site Directorate. This particular path climbs from Shrapnel Valley to Russell's Top and en route it provided (for me at least) some unusual views of The Sphinx

image.jpeg.36f3c8e5b81ddafd2bafac17836aeea2.jpeg

 

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The shot below barely does justice to the dramatic landscape, but may perhaps help suggest the extremely deep gully found immediately to the north of The Sphinx and which falls into its shadow

P1080568.JPG.114764086248474bb88469e2c7b48b7a.JPG

Edited by michaeldr
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Many thanks for these excellent photographs Michael. Dramatic indeed and I can see why such a shadow would be cast. Do you have other photographs you could share maybe start a thread. Maybe one day I could get there but my bad knee would be useless there.  :thumbsup:

 

Mike

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49 minutes ago, Skipman said:

Do you have other photographs you could share

Here're a couple more Mike, all taken on the same tour

image.jpeg.3e10e02ab13384eea4898a99d06b8fd4.jpeg

 

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This may be an even better one of that deep gully

image.jpeg.8ffec43ee9ed5623953dd4ea240830de.jpeg

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image.jpeg.f60c0192f55517e2f9eacb3482c4aaae.jpeg

This particular tour came Amber rated, but I would put it at the top end of Amber,

as there is sooooo much climbing to do - note here the steps down into the dip and then UP the other side! And that formula is repeated throughout the walk time & time again!

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I just wouldn't manage that. Before my fall 4 yrs ago would have run up there. Thanks for sharing.

 

Mike

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My own problem Mike, is anno domini.

It's certainly a great walk, taking you to parts which are rarely seen by the ordinary battlefield tourist

and I am (let there be no doubt) glad to have have had this opportunity. …

But as I progress (if progress I do? :huh:) further through my late seventies, then lines will inevitably have to be drawn and all the steps involved in this particular tour may have to be given a miss next time.

 

However, if you are fit and can manage it, then go for it, and its views not usually seen will give you immense reward.

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On 24/09/2022 at 18:20, michaeldr said:

This may be an even better one of that deep gully

image.jpeg.8ffec43ee9ed5623953dd4ea240830de.jpeg

 4166945.JPG

This, from the AWM's collection, shows the Sphinx and the gully but from the opposite direction (taken from Williams Pier on 14 December 1915). It gives a good idea of the steep side of the gully and of the deep shadow into which it can fall 

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The view looking up to the Sphinx from the shore is so spectacular that Simon Doughty and the photographer James Kerr have not only given it a double (landscape) page spread in their book “Silent Landscape at Gallipolithe battlefields of the Dardanelles 100 years on” [Helion & Co Ltd, 2018, ISBN 978 1 911512 73 8] they have also used a crop of it for the book's jacket - see https://www.jameskerr.co.uk/published 

This book is highly recommended not only for the enthusiast who, for whatever reason, cannot make it out to this battlefield, but also for the lucky one who can, but nevertheless must sit thousands of kilometres away for the other 50+ weeks of the year

Note once again the shadow encroaching on the gully to the north of the Sphinx

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