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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

Charles Edgar Evershed


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I'm looking for info on the above, my maternal grandfather. I know he joined the RFC I think in 1915 he never spoke of it and cried when Chamberin waved his piece of paper in the air, whilst he served at home he was deeply affected by it as his brother Dudley served on the Western Front was gassed and buried alive leaving him bald and shaky with shell shock for the rest of his life.

He was a Draper by profession so may have been employed in that capacity, we think he trained as a pilot in 1918 but the war ended, he tried to rejoin in 39 but was turned down on age.

The picture may have been taken at Xmas 1916, it's numbered with another so dated.

 

Ta.

1652364153791481531300.jpg

Edited by Mick M
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File is AIR 79/107/8204 as Edgar Charles Evershed

Service number 8204 indicates a 1915 recruit

Not digitized by TNA, available via Findmypast etc for a fee unless someone has a subscription and will download it..

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15 minutes ago, nieuport11 said:

Not digitized by TNA, available via Findmypast etc for a fee unless someone has a subscription and will download it..

Skating on thin ice. Note the rules - Members may NOT use the GWF as a platform to ask parties who are subscribers to various subscription sites to download material on their behalf or to post it on the GWF.

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1 hour ago, horatio2 said:

http://www.rafmuseumstoryvault.org.uk/archive/evershed-e.c  records him as an Acetylene Welder (Air Mech 1) in both RFC and RAF service.

Thank you,

Was the 1917 promotion from II class to I class? I expect he was taught the welding....during the 2nd war he was employed making precision instrumentation for ships.

Mick..

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1 hour ago, nieuport11 said:

File is AIR 79/107/8204 as Edgar Charles Evershed

Service number 8204 indicates a 1915 recruit

Not digitized by TNA, available via Findmypast etc for a fee unless someone has a subscription and will download it..

Thank you.

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7 minutes ago, Mick M said:

as the 1917 promotion from II class to I class?

I believe that to be correct.

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32 minutes ago, horatio2 said:

I believe that to be correct.

Thank you.

2 hours ago, horatio2 said:

Skating on thin ice. Note the rules - Members may NOT use the GWF as a platform to ask parties who are subscribers to various subscription sites to download material on their behalf or to post it on the GWF.

If thats aimed at me I apologise I was after info from the photo and should have been more specific.

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I was once told the tunic in the picture was a flying jacket, is that correct?

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23 minutes ago, Mick M said:

I was once told the tunic in the picture was a flying jacket, is that correct?

No it is not specifically, although it was worn when flying too if that was your trade.. It is the standard enlisted ranks RFC service dress jacket up to April 1 1918. It is a Lancers style 'Plastron' Jacket but more colloquially referred to,  even at the time,  a the 'Maternity' jacket - as it stonlgy resembled the dress worn by pregnanat women at the time. Officers wore the same pattern if they were direct entry to the RFC versus on detached service from a parent infantry unit when they would wear the regimanetal uniform- Officers uniforms  usually a higher quality wool. Flying trades were indicated by a pilots or an observors brevet worn on the left chest.

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11 hours ago, scottmarchand said:

No it is not specifically, although it was worn when flying too if that was your trade.. It is the standard enlisted ranks RFC service dress jacket up to April 1 1918. It is a Lancers style 'Plastron' Jacket but more colloquially referred to,  even at the time,  a the 'Maternity' jacket - as it stonlgy resembled the dress worn by pregnanat women at the time. Officers wore the same pattern if they were direct entry to the RFC versus on detached service from a parent infantry unit when they would wear the regimanetal uniform- Officers uniforms  usually a higher quality wool. Flying trades were indicated by a pilots or an observors brevet worn on the left chest.

Brilliant, thank you.

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On 12/05/2022 at 20:30, Mick M said:

I was once told the tunic in the picture was a flying jacket, is that correct?

Well it's was designed with flying in mind as it was more windproof than the standard jacket and with no protruding buttons it wouldn't snag on flying wires etc . It's adoption for ground crew is less easy to explain but one imagines that it's smart appearance was deemed suitable for the ranks and gave them a distinctive look at a time when they were trying to build a esprite de corps.

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2 hours ago, nils d said:

Well it's was designed with flying in mind as it was more windproof than the standard jacket and with no protruding buttons it wouldn't snag on flying wires etc . It's adoption for ground crew is less easy to explain but one imagines that it's smart appearance was deemed suitable for the ranks and gave them a distinctive look at a time when they were trying to build a esprite de corps.

Thank you, the picture was taken around Xmas 1916 so your argument about timed for esprit de corps  is logical....

 

Mick.

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7 hours ago, Mick M said:

Thank you, the picture was taken around Xmas 1916 so your argument about timed for esprit de corps  is logical....

 

Mick.

Actually I was referring to the RFCs foundation in 1912 . They needed to differentiate themselves from other Army units .

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11 hours ago, nils d said:

Actually I was referring to the RFCs foundation in 1912 . They needed to differentiate themselves from other Army units .

Thanks

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