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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

Belgian Grave inscription


robbie

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I am having great difficulty reading the text on this WW1 Belgian's gravestone I found in Canterbury.

His name is Wattier, that's about all I can read..

Would be grateful for any help, thanks all.

Robbie

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Robbie,

Not everything, but hope this helps :

WATTIER

Gaston - ... (?)

sous lieutenant

1er regiment de chasseurs a pied

né à ................ (?)

le 18 decembre 1877

mort pour la Belgique

le 2(?) novembre 1914

Cheers,

CGI

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Thanks for this..my eyes are terrible..

Robbie

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Can anyone else add to this?

Many thanks.

Robbie

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Can anyone else add to this?

Many thanks.

Robbie

Robbie,

I wish I could help, or even try.

But with the new upgraded Forum it appears that all photos have disappeared... The ones in attachment, the avatars, ...

Sad.

Is it just me ? Does anyone else have this problem ?

It seems that others have seen the Belgian gravestone....

Aurel

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Disregard my 'problem' in my posting.

I was too impatient.

I've just been informed that my problem is 'normal' , that some others have it too, and that it soon gradually will be solved.

Looking forward to seeing the Belgian gravestone, and hoping that I will be able to help decipher !

Aurel

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  • 4 weeks later...

Here is the photo of this man's grave found in Canterbury cemetery.

Thanks to Aurel for alerting me to this and to CDT (Bob) for offering information on this man.

RObbie

post-4246-1113728393.jpg

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FYI: There are some Belgian wargraves like this in the cemetery in the grounds of the long-since-demolished military hospital in Netley, Southampton. (The cemetery is now adjacent to the Hampshire Constabulary Training Centre.)

I assume these were an official design provided by the Belgian Govt.

Ricardo

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thanks ricardo...I had quite forgotten about this thread, until Bob emailed this morning to say he has some information about this man.

Robbie

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Interesting thanks Terry. I wonder how he got to be buried in Canterbury. If he died in a ferry accident you'd think he would be in Shorncliffe or Cheriton in Folkestone.

I wonder if he was another flu epidemic victim.

Robbie :blink:

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Robbie

There are a number of Belgians buried in the south-east - many from 1914.

There are some in Brighton, Eastbourne and Hastings in Sussex alone. They were wounded in the early days of the war and brought to UK hospitals as were British troops.

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Robbie

There are a number of Belgians buried in the south-east - many from 1914.

There are some in Brighton, Eastbourne and Hastings in Sussex alone. They were wounded in the early days of the war and brought to UK hospitals as were British troops.

Great thanks Terry. Would it have been Canterbury hospital?

R

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Robbie,

What your read on the headstone was correct.

Except that he was born at Baudour (name you could not decipher)

Baudour is a village in the Province of Henegouwen / Hainaut, 10 km west of Mons.

And I think he died on 21 Nov 1914, not 2 Nov. (21 makes more sense, since this was in the First Battle of Ypres).

Aurel

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Excellent, thanks Aurel, and thanks Terry, and thanks Bob.

Can't complain about the service, can I?

Fabulous place this Forum.

Robbie :D

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Robbie

There are a number of Belgians buried in the south-east - many from 1914.

There are some in Brighton, Eastbourne and Hastings in Sussex alone. They were wounded in the early days of the war and brought to UK hospitals as were British troops.

There are a number of 1914 Belgian casualties buried in the Roman Catholic Cemetery at Kensal Green in London.

They have their own plot and, IIRC, they also have some sort of memorial.

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Robbie,

What your read on the headstone was correct.

Except that he was born at Baudour (name you could not decipher)

Baudour is a village in the Province of Henegouwen / Hainaut,  10  km west of Mons.

And I think he died on 21 Nov 1914, not 2 Nov. (21 makes more sense, since this was in the First Battle of Ypres).

Aurel

A little extra...

his army number was 125/ and his regiment was the 1st Jagers te Voet. His cause of death was "Died of Wounds" and he was born on 18th December 1877 (making him 37 years of age at death). He's listed as having died on 23rd November 1914.

Dave.

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fabulous thanks Dave, and Beppo.

Robbie :)

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Great thanks Terry. Would it have been Canterbury hospital?

As Canterbury is so near the coast I am sure that several hospitals would have been set up for casualties although probably not so early in the war.

He may well have been treated at what is now the Kent & Canterbury - A hospital where I have spent much time in the past two months after my 19 year old son was the victim of an unprovoked daylight attack in the quiet streets of fair Canterbury! :angry:

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How unfortunate for your son. Is he OK now?

Robbie

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Yes he is and thank you for asking.

A triple fracture of the cheek plus dented confidence and pride. The former now healed and the other two well on the way back to normal!

Tough place that Canterbury.

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Oh no. I've just sold my house in Dover and bought another just out of canterbury.

Robbie (always the last to know) -_-

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Oh no. I've just sold my house in Dover and bought another just out of canterbury. 

Robbie (always the last to know)  -_-

Bob has just sent me this newspaper cutting of the man in question. Many thanks Bob. Also a website which some may find useful.

Robbie

post-4246-1113762283.jpg

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Patrick deWolf would like a copy of thisphoto, I think as he is/was doing an inventory of Belgians who died.

Unfortunately, he seems to have gone into purdah. He doesn't reply to anything I send him on his PANDORA mail address or via his website.

Anyone know what has happened to him?

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  • 1 year later...
Robbie,

Not everything, but hope this helps :

WATTIER

Gaston - ... (?)

sous lieutenant

1er regiment de chasseurs a pied

né à ................ (?)

le 18 decembre 1877

mort pour la Belgique

le 2(?) novembre 1914

Cheers,

CGI

it s french and it says wattier gaston ...second lieutenant of first division foot hunters which is just the exact translation no idea what the equivalent is in english ...born at .... the 18th of december 1877 dead for his country belgium november 1914---he died of deadly wounds in the head by a bomb shell ???

sorry i m belgian but my english not allways accurate enough to give the right translation

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