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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

Stoker awarded DSM


jeffb

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I am trying to find infomation on a Stocker 1st class Horace Bounds. I know that he drowned on the 31/1/1918, in a collision in the north sea onboard HM S/M K4. what were the circumstance's of the collision ? and the fate of the sub.

Also what was he awarded a DSM for?  Hopefully someone can throw some light on this for me.

 

TIA jeffb

 

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He is one of nearly one hundred ratings awarded the DSM is the same Gazette " in recognition of their services in submarines in enemy waters."

In the same Gazette is another long list of DSMs awarded "for Services in Action with Enemy Submarines". 

The former are more likely to be for services in general rather than for individual action incidents.

An interweb search for HM Submarine K4 will give numerous accounts of her loss.

 

Edited by horatio2
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The record merely confirms his demise when K4 sank and that he had served in that boat since she was first commissioned on 1 Jan 1917. He had previously served at Dardanelles in the destroyer HMS WEAR.

The DSM was undoubtedly linked to his SUPERIOR Ability assessment as a Stoker.

Edited by horatio2
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18 hours ago, horatio2 said:

The DSM was undoubtedly linked to his SUPERIOR Ability assessment as a Stoker.

Good morning H2. Your comment that "the DSM was undoubtedly linked to his SUPERIOR ability assessment as a Stoker" intrigued me somewhat. There would be many 1000s of men given  SUP and even EXCP (Exceptional) ability assessments. However around 4200 DSMs were awarded during WW1 which included some 1 bar and a couple of 2 bar awards. As the criteria for DSM award was for acts of bravery at sea, I’m not sure that a SUP ability assessment would be applicable as a criteria. Would appreciate your comments.

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Good point, Ll.

I did not mean to suggest that the DSM was a direct result of his Superior ability as a stoker. Rather the reverse: that it should come as no surprise that a rating awarded the DSM !in recognition of his services in submarines should also have been assessed as Superior in his day-to-day employment..

The DSM was awarded "for bravery and resourcefulness [not in action in this case] on active service" - resourcefulness being an attribute which could also have contributed to his previous four Superior annual assessments.

 

 

 

Edited by horatio2
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