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RWF, 2nd battalion WW1


Phyllis Newman
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5 minutes ago, Phyllis Newman said:

I have his service number & dates of service.

 

Hi Phyllis and welcome to the forum.

 

Would you like to share them with us :)

 

Cheers,

Peter

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Thank you very much for your reply. My grandad's service number is no 8369, private Harry Evans. Harry enlisted in the RWF on 27/5/1904 and was discharged on 13/7/1917 having been wounded in battle.  I have looked on different forums for a couple of years now but it’s all a bit sketchy..Thank you again. 

 

 

 

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Hi. Thank you for your interest. I found grandad’s service number amongst some papers that my aunt kept of family memorabilia. Grandad’s service number was on a document Mentioned in Dispatches. He also received some medals.

 

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25 minutes ago, Phyllis Newman said:

Hi. Thank you for your interest. I found grandad’s service number amongst some papers that my aunt kept of family memorabilia. Grandad’s service number was on a document Mentioned in Dispatches. He also received some medals.

 


Phyliss 2nd Battalion RWF had a very fine reputation.  If you enjoy reading and would like to learn more about the battalion then I recommend that you seek out either library copies or second hand copies of two books that cover the battalion’s service during WW1:

 

1.  The War the Infantry Knew, by Captain JC Dunn. https://www.abebooks.co.uk/9780349106359/Infantry-Knew-1914-1919-Chronicle-Service-0349106355/plp

 

2.  Old Soldiers Never Die, by Private Frank Richards. https://www.abebooks.co.uk/book-search/title/old-soldiers-never-die/author/frank-richards/

 

Both are excellent reads.

Edited by FROGSMILE
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44 minutes ago, Phyllis Newman said:

Thank you for your interest. I found grandad’s service number amongst some papers that my aunt kept of family memorabilia. Grandad’s service number was on a document Mentioned in Dispatches. He also received some medals.

Do you still have access to them?

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I would suggest that the Frank Richards's version to read is the annotated version, approved by Frank's daughter, edited by Krijnen and Langley.  It is this one

https://www.abebooks.co.uk/servlet/BookDetailsPL?bi=30508355549&searchurl=sortby%3D20%26tn%3Dold%2Bsoldiers%2Bnever%2Bdie%26an%3Dfrank%2Brichards&cm_sp=snippet-_-srp3-_-title13

 

but a new one from me is far less expensive, especially to a relative of the battalion.

 

Also the specialist's book is Duty Done, by Langley; published with the approval and assistance of the regiment.

 

I declare a financial interest, as Langley.

 

A Personal message to me would give you access to the most modern research and insights.

Edited by Muerrisch
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11 hours ago, Phyllis Newman said:

Thank you for your reply and for your book recommendations. I will click on the links you kindly provided. Thank you very much. 


I’m glad to have helped Phyllis.  Some copies of the books can be quite expensive and I suppose it depends upon whether you wish to retain them in a book case, as an historical enthusiast might, to take out and re-read from time-to-time.  If not, you can always order a copy from your local library and, apart from a reservation fee, that will cost you a lot less.  Alternatively, older editions can be obtained for less than £5 as you will have seen. Whatever edition you get will give you a good read and leave you with a better understanding of what your forebear experienced.

Edited by FROGSMILE
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Thank you for that   I have read so much but bits and pieces. I have a couple of books from the library but mainly researched via the web . I am much more informed now and for the better.  How those men such as my grandfather survived trench ware fare is a miracle. Thank you .

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14 hours ago, Muerrisch said:

I would suggest that the Frank Richards's version to read is the annotated version, approved by Frank's daughter, edited by Krijnen and Langley.  It is this one

https://www.abebooks.co.uk/servlet/BookDetailsPL?bi=30508355549&searchurl=sortby%3D20%26tn%3Dold%2Bsoldiers%2Bnever%2Bdie%26an%3Dfrank%2Brichards&cm_sp=snippet-_-srp3-_-title13

 

but a new one from me is far less expensive, especially to a relative of the battalion.

 

Also the specialist's book is Duty Done, by Langley; published with the approval and assistance of the regiment.

 

I declare a financial interest, as Langley.

 

A Personal message to me would give you access to the most modern research and insights.

 

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Thank you for your reply. I have heard of the book you mentioned ‘old soldiers never die’.   I will follow your link. Also your reference to ‘Duty Done’.  I will look for it now. Thank you again. 

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15 hours ago, Muerrisch said:

I would suggest that the Frank Richards's version to read is the annotated version, approved by Frank's daughter, edited by Krijnen and Langley.  It is this one

https://www.abebooks.co.uk/servlet/BookDetailsPL?bi=30508355549&searchurl=sortby%3D20%26tn%3Dold%2Bsoldiers%2Bnever%2Bdie%26an%3Dfrank%2Brichards&cm_sp=snippet-_-srp3-_-title13

 

but a new one from me is far less expensive, especially to a relative of the battalion.

 

Also the specialist's book is Duty Done, by Langley; published with the approval and assistance of the regiment.

 

I declare a financial interest, as Langley.

 

A Personal message to me would give you access to the most modern research and insights.

 

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32 minutes ago, Phyllis Newman said:

Thank you for your reply. I have heard of the book you mentioned ‘old soldiers never die’.   I will follow your link. Also your reference to ‘Duty Done’.  I will look for it now. Thank you again. 


Phyliss, just to be clear, all the books mentioned are specifically about 2nd Battalion RWF.

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Harry was admitted to No 34 Casualty clearing station on 5th of November 1916 with Gunshot wounds to the face and right arm.

He was transferred the following day to 9 AT.

At a glance it looks as the 2 RWF took at least 50 wounded that day, the medical records are specific in specifying wound types and the vast bulk of the wounds are by gunshot.

 

Edit...just checked CWGC, on the day Harry was wounded

2 RWF had 29 men killed.

Edited by sadbrewer
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Hi Phyllis,

 

1 hour ago, sadbrewer said:

Harry was admitted to No 34 Casualty clearing station on 5th of November 1916 with Gunshot wounds to the face and right arm.

He was transferred the following day to 9 AT.

 

Sadbrewer has picked up another man by the name of Evans (also 2/RWF) who appears on the same page of the admission/discharge register (link). The note against your Harry actually shows:

image.png.f4a57aa600188ffdca099907ee1fd654.png

Image sourced from Findmypast

 

,,,same admission and discharge details though. It also notes that he was with 'C' Company, which might help to tie him back more with the events recorded in the Battalion, and Brigade war diaries, They are available (after registration - link) as free downloads from the National Archives (link and link). It would also be worth considering this diary - link

 

At the time of his wounding 34 CCS was based at Grove Town. The war diary for 9 Ambulance Train would probably show its' destination, though not the institution that Harry was transferred to. It can be found at the National Archives here.

 

If there are any map references shown, there is help on how to read them here.

 

Regards

Chris

 

 

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Appears to have arrived France with first half of battalion 11th August 1914 so entitled to 1914 star with clasp....... 2nd RWF were the second [by a short head] battalion to disembark in France

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Thank you for this. I will look at the links you have sent and work my way through each one to try to get a better understanding and sense of things my grandad and his comrades faced daily. I do remember looking at pages of the war diaries about a year ago but hadn’t a clear idea of how to go about such things. I can now understand how important it is to get guidance in such a specialist field. 

 

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