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Enlistment type


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Is there any easy way of finding out if a particular man had enlisted on T124X, T125Y, T124Z or T299Z terms ? I have a few men I want to look at but not sure if it's possible.

 

Thanks in advance.

Craig

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T.124X = Enlistment into MMR by professional mercantile marine seamen.

T.124Y = Enlistment into MMR by professional yacht crewmen.

T.124Z = Enlistment into MMR by professional fishermen.

And I’m guessing that T.299Z was used for RFA? - can you confirm?

 

Registry of merchant seamen on RN ships is contained in TNA sub-series within BT 390 (T.124X’s & T.124T’s), but maybe only WW2 recorded there? Such men would have qualified for the BWM and the Mercantile Marine War Medal, details of which can be found in BT 351/1/2.

 

Also some T.124X agreements have been digitised by  Memorial University of Newfoundland and are available online on a searchable database... https://www.mun.ca/mha/t124x/t124xcrews.php

 

 

MB

 

Edited by KizmeRD
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Thank you.

 

You've also answered my next question as to what each of the types covered -I think the T299Z was RFA but not 100%.

 

Craig

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If it is of any further help Craig, here are the definitions of the various T Articles of agreement from one of the many files at TNA on this subject. These were used into the Second World War as well.

I have not, as yet found out the subtlety of the difference between a T124B and T124Y!

 

Whilst there is nothing wrong with the use of the word enlistment in the case of the MMR, the signing on using the T124 Articles of Agreement did not necessarily constitute a permanent agreement/enlistment into the MMR, if the ship on which you were signed on returned to commercial use and took you with it as a crew member then you ceased to be under Naval Disciplinary Regulations and a member of the MMR, neither did it prevent you from rejoining at another time.  The Masters, who were made temporary Lieutenants RNR appeared and disappeared from the Navy lists if their ships were returned to commercial use.  The agreement was on a ship or voyage basis and was not binding once the voyage was competed and the Articles of Agreement changed.  However if an officer or rating continued to sign T 124 Agreements then they would continue to serve in the MMR.  A trawl through 1915 Crew Lists turn up many ships that went from standard Foreign Going or Home Trade Commercial Agreements to T124 Agreements and back again.

Judging by the service records of a large number of Merchant Seamen who turned up in the ranks of the Inland Water Transport section of the Royal Engineers who had previously served on Armed Merchant Cruisers, Trawlers, Drifters  and Auxiliaries and all the T124 Articles it would appear that service on any of these ships was not considered permanent. This is born out by this copy of the front page of the Articles from a Commissioned Store Ship where notice of termination of the agreement could be given.T124.JPG.192e13c1408a76589ef729322be3bec8.JPG

Unfortunately this makes hunting out men who served under T124 Agreements all the more difficult

Tony

 

T 124 Agreement

 

T124- Agreement Between Admiralty and A Mercantile Marine Officer or Rating for Service in His Majesty's Vessel. One vessel only. (Only used during World War I.}

T124X- Agreement Between Admiralty and A Mercantile Marine Officer or Rating for Service in any of His Majesty's Auxiliary War Vessels. 

T124T- Agreement Between Admiralty and A Mercantile Marine Officer or Rating for Service in His Majesty's Commissioned Rescue Tugs.

T124Z- Agreement Between Admiralty and A Mercantile Marine Officer or Rating for Service in His Majesty's Minesweepers. Drifter Ratings added from 1 Sep 1918

T124B- Agreement Between Admiralty and A Mercantile Marine Officer or Rating for Service in His Majesty's Commissioned Yachts

T124Y- Agreement Between Admiralty and A Mercantile Marine Officer or Rating for Service in His Majesty's Commissioned Yachts

T299Z-Agreement Between Admiralty and A Mercantile Marine Officer or Rating for Service in an Admiralty Fleet Auxiliary

CSP IX- Agreement Between Admiralty and A Mercantile Marine Officer or Rating for Service in Admiralty Cable Ships.

 

 

Edited by MerchantOldSalt
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Thanks Tony, good to see the full list of T.124 agreements.

 

The plain T.124 agreement (no suffix) came into existence at the start of the war to facilitate the continuing employment of mercantile seamen (who were not already naval reservists) on the ships that they were already serving on, and in the role that they were already engaged in, albeit that their ship had now been taken into Government service as a naval auxiliary. As Tony says, the men were not technically ‘enlisted’ but by signing the agreement they consented to be bound by the terms of the Naval Discipline Act - broadly meaning that they then had to obey all lawful orders and go wherever they were sent (i.e. potentially in harms way), or suffer naval punishments for refusal to do so. In return they largely maintained their pre-existing pay rate and employment conditions. This was initially a temporary arrangement (not to exceed six months, but obviously renewable was permissible) - and the T.124 agreement would terminate if for any reason the Admiralty no longer required the ship (or say it got sunk!)
The short term engagement basis changed somewhat in 1916 when the revised T.124X agreement got introduced (round about the same time that the Military Service Act was passed). Thereafter mercantile seamen serving on naval auxiliaries were required to serve in any ship that they were assigned to, for the duration of current hostilities. This is also the point when the ‘Mercantile Marine Reserve‘ officially came into existence (really little more than a register of such seamen and a central body to administer manning requirements). At the same time all seamens’ pay rates became standardised, so that men who were fulfilling similar roles on different ships were now receiving identical rates of pay (regardless of what their previous civilian earnings had been).

MB

Edited by KizmeRD
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