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Bill Sanderson

Walter Anderson, Kings Liverpool Regiment

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Bill Sanderson

Have been trying for a long time to find info about service record of my wife's uncle, Walter Anderson. There is a picture of what's believed to be him in a sergeant's uniform of the King's Liverpool Regiment, but no medals and no service number. There is a Pte Walter Anderson who was in the KLR and was killed in the war but this is not him. We believe "our" Walter may not have been a combatant owing to ill health, but was a shipping clerk before and after the war and likely to have been a good administrator.

Walter was born in Everton, Liverpool in 1889. He married in 1914 and was probably conscripted in late 1916. The Electoral Register shows that he was on military service in 1919. His children were born 1921 and 1922. He died in 1928 of heart failure. That's most of what I know about him. He didn't show up on the KLR register when this was available on line, and I haven't found the Absent Voters List for Liverpool which might have given his service details. Hence, I've run into the proverbial brick wall.

Unless you can help me!

1823356730_WalterAndersonArmyuniform.jpg.4a4f5cf1784ef896947686631c17381b.jpg

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charlie962
Posted (edited)

Welcome to the Forum Bill Sanderson.

 

I see there is a Liverpool Collegiate School Admissions for him (grandfather W Bewsher, which matches 1911 Census for the shipping clerk) and that the same name also appears on that school's Memorial Roll. The Roll transcription gives no detail. But it may be that the Memorial is for those died rather than served and thus refers to the other Walter Anderson you noted ? Anyway, Can the school archives be traced ? Perhaps through this old boys assoc ?

 

Charlie

Edited by charlie962

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PRC

Hi and welcome to the forum.

 

I take it this was the Walter Anderson, mothers' maiden name Bewsher, whose birth was registered with the civil authorities in the West Derby District of Lancashire in the April to June quarter of 1889? Thats the only likely birth recorded in that part of the world in 1889. There was a William Anderson, mothers maiden name Collins, whose birth was registered with the Civil Authorities in the Birkenhead District - but that was in the July to September quarter of 1888.

 

A fairly common name, especially with no middle names, no obvious surviving service records, no knowledge of overseas service, and no indication of early discharge on health grounds, (if he was on the AVL for 1919), makes for a tough find.

 

The only Lancashire marriage I can see in 1914, (none in Cheshire), occurred in the Haslingden District in the October to December quarter of that year. The marriage was to a Margaret A. Pilkington. The area covered by that District can be seen here https://www.ukbmd.org.uk/reg/districts/haslingden.html

However no likely children in 1921 / 1922. While it's not impossible and could occur for a variety of reasons, a seven year gap from marriage to first child seems unusual, so would be good to confirm details of the correct marriage. Even if sadly an earlier child died, both the relevant birth certificate and death certificate if they occur during the right period may give more details about William's military service.

 

Finally, I note you say he died of heart failure. Would this have been in circumstances that might have led to a coroners inquest? Sometimes war time service gets brought up as a factor in the reporting of these as a potential contributory factor.

 

Cheers,

Peter

 

 

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charlie962
Posted (edited)

His brother Harold has a surviving TF attestation dated 1911 carrying on until his discharge (health ?) 1916.

 

His next of kin is noted (after an update) as Bro, 45 Anfield St Liverpool.

Edited by charlie962

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Bill Sanderson
36 minutes ago, PRC said:

Hi and welcome to the forum.

 

I take it this was the Walter Anderson, mothers' maiden name Bewsher, whose birth was registered with the civil authorities in the West Derby District of Lancashire in the April to June quarter of 1889? Thats the only likely birth recorded in that part of the world in 1889. There was a William Anderson, mothers maiden name Collins, whose birth was registered with the Civil Authorities in the Birkenhead District - but that was in the July to September quarter of 1888.

 

A fairly common name, especially with no middle names, no obvious surviving service records, no knowledge of overseas service, and no indication of early discharge on health grounds, (if he was on the AVL for 1919), makes for a tough find.

 

The only Lancashire marriage I can see in 1914, (none in Cheshire), occurred in the Haslingden District in the October to December quarter of that year. The marriage was to a Margaret A. Pilkington. The area covered by that District can be seen here https://www.ukbmd.org.uk/reg/districts/haslingden.html

However no likely children in 1921 / 1922. While it's not impossible and could occur for a variety of reasons, a seven year gap from marriage to first child seems unusual, so would be good to confirm details of the correct marriage. Even if sadly an earlier child died, both the relevant birth certificate and death certificate if they occur during the right period may give more details about William's military service.

 

Finally, I note you say he died of heart failure. Would this have been in circumstances that might have led to a coroners inquest? Sometimes war time service gets brought up as a factor in the reporting of these as a potential contributory factor.

 

Cheers,

Peter

 

 

You definitely have the right birth. Walter Anderson married Martha Gamble in 1914. He died in 1928 but no inquest. Some files attached. This is indeed a tough quest!

Walter Anderson b1889 birth cert.jpg

walter martha anderson wedding.jpg

walter anderson b1889 death cert.pdf

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PRC
31 minutes ago, charlie962 said:

His brother Harold has a surviving TF attestation dated 1911 carrying on until his discharge (health ?) 1916.

 

His next of kin is noted (after an update) as Bro, 45 Anfield St Liverpool.

 

On one of the pages for Harold he is shown as aged 22 at the time of discharge in 1916. May be a co-incidence but the birth of a Harold Anderson, mothers' maiden name Bewsher, was registered with the Civil Authorities in the West Derby District of Lancashire in the July to September quarter, (Q3), of 1894.

 

The next of kin originally for Harold, presumably at the time he originally enlisted in 1911, was an uncle, Benjamin Bewsher.

 

1 hour ago, charlie962 said:

I see there is a Liverpool Collegiate School Admissions for him (grandfather W Bewsher, which matches 1911 Census for the shipping clerk) and that the same name also appears on that school's Memorial Roll. The Roll transcription gives no detail. But it may be that the Memorial is for those died rather than served and thus refers to the other Walter Anderson you noted ?

 

Just tried a few random sampls of the less common names and they all had a matching entry on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website, most with additional information linking them to Liverpool and the others serving with The Kings (Liverpool Regiment).

 

Cheers,

Peter

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Bill Sanderson
30 minutes ago, charlie962 said:

His brother Harold has a surviving TF attestation dated 1911 carrying on until his discharge (health ?) 1916.

 

His next of kin is noted (after an update) as Bro, 45 Anfield St Liverpool.

Yes, that's right. Harold joined the Royal Field Artillery in 1911 but had an appendectomy in 1914 and was eventually discharged with a ventral hernia caused by the operation. The next of kin on his army record that I have was Walter at 35 Baltic Street, Anfield, where Walter lived from his marriage to his death.

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Bill Sanderson
2 minutes ago, PRC said:

 

On one of the pages for Harold he is shown as aged 22 at the time of discharge in 1916. May be a co-incidence but the birth of a Harold Anderson, mothers' maiden name Bewsher, was registered with the Civil Authorities in the West Derby District of Lancashire in the July to September quarter, (Q3), of 1894.

 

The next of kin originally for Harold, presumably at the time he originally enlisted in 1911, was an uncle, Benjamin Bewsher.

 

 

Just tried a few random sampls of the less common names and they all had a matching entry on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website, most with additional information linking them to Liverpool and the others serving with The Kings (Liverpool Regiment).

 

Cheers,

Peter

Yes, Harold was Walter's brother. See attached. However, the Walter Anderson on the school memorial roll was clearly a different man. There was a Walter Anderson who was in the KLR from 1914 and who died in the war, but this was not "ours".

Harold Anderson birth.jpg

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davidbohl

Walter dropped dead in the street according to the Echo 16/7/1928

From the BNA

2072887965_Screenshot2020-07-22at14_13_00.png.553b5064cbeb411296e23767c5a03157.png

 

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Bill Sanderson
1 minute ago, davidbohl said:

Walter dropped dead in the street according to the Echo 16/7/1928

From the BNA

2072887965_Screenshot2020-07-22at14_13_00.png.553b5064cbeb411296e23767c5a03157.png

 

Yes, that's him.

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Bill Sanderson
1 hour ago, charlie962 said:

Welcome to the Forum Bill Sanderson.

 

I see there is a Liverpool Collegiate School Admissions for him (grandfather W Bewsher, which matches 1911 Census for the shipping clerk) and that the same name also appears on that school's Memorial Roll. The Roll transcription gives no detail. But it may be that the Memorial is for those died rather than served and thus refers to the other Walter Anderson you noted ? Anyway, Can the school archives be traced ? Perhaps through this old boys assoc ?

 

Charlie

The admission record and the memorial roll entry must be for two different people. There was another Walter Anderson in the KLR who joined up earlier and was indeed killed in the war.

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PRC
1 minute ago, Bill Sanderson said:

es, Harold was Walter's brother. See attached. However, the Walter Anderson on the school memorial roll was clearly a different man. There was a Walter Anderson who was in the KLR from 1914 and who died in the war, but this was not "ours".

 

The memorial just says W. Anderson, so no guarantee that it is even a Walter.

1 hour ago, charlie962 said:

I see there is a Liverpool Collegiate School Admissions for him (grandfather W Bewsher, which matches 1911 Census for the shipping clerk)

 

So agree seems likely the admission record and the memorial record refer to two distinct individuals.

 

However just in case I also checked the civil index of births for England & Wales. My source for mothers' maiden name pre-August 1911 is far from perfect - many are blank and I've never mastered the GRO search function so I can't check that - but I see three potential children recorded in the right time frame and in the West Derby civil registration district with mothers' maiden name Bewsher - Walter, Harold and a William James, birth registered in the July to September quarter, (Q3), of 1891.

 

On the 1901 Census of England and Wales there is a 9 year old William 'Jame' Anderson, born Liverpool, who was recorded living with his uncle and aunt, Gabriel and Mary Tyson, at 4 Burleigh Road, Everton. On the 1911 Census of England & Wales there is 19 year old William James Anderson still living with the same couple but now at 217 Brickfield Road North, Everton. James works as a Flour Millers Labourer. Gabriel and Mary Tyson state they have been married 23 years, so checking that out comes up with a most likely marriage of a Gabriel Watson Tyson to a Polly Brewsher.

 

I can't see a likely candidate for William as having fallen in the war, although strangely there is a Medal Index Card for an Acting Serjeant 32111 William Anderson, Liverpool Regiment who appears to have the word "Died" written in the remarks section of his Medal Index Card. However I don't think it's the right man as he was previously Private 0829 in the Hampshire Regiment.

 

However I note you say the picture is only 'believed' to be Walter - does that open up the possibility that it could indeed be another family member?

 

Cheers,

Peter

 

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Bill Sanderson
Posted (edited)
42 minutes ago, PRC said:

 

The memorial just says W. Anderson, so no guarantee that it is even a Walter.

 

So agree seems likely the admission record and the memorial record refer to two distinct individuals.

 

However just in case I also checked the civil index of births for England & Wales. My source for mothers' maiden name pre-August 1911 is far from perfect - many are blank and I've never mastered the GRO search function so I can't check that - but I see three potential children recorded in the right time frame and in the West Derby civil registration district with mothers' maiden name Bewsher - Walter, Harold and a William James, birth registered in the July to September quarter, (Q3), of 1891.

 

On the 1901 Census of England and Wales there is a 9 year old William 'Jame' Anderson, born Liverpool, who was recorded living with his uncle and aunt, Gabriel and Mary Tyson, at 4 Burleigh Road, Everton. On the 1911 Census of England & Wales there is 19 year old William James Anderson still living with the same couple but now at 217 Brickfield Road North, Everton. James works as a Flour Millers Labourer. Gabriel and Mary Tyson state they have been married 23 years, so checking that out comes up with a most likely marriage of a Gabriel Watson Tyson to a Polly Brewsher.

 

I can't see a likely candidate for William as having fallen in the war, although strangely there is a Medal Index Card for an Acting Serjeant 32111 William Anderson, Liverpool Regiment who appears to have the word "Died" written in the remarks section of his Medal Index Card. However I don't think it's the right man as he was previously Private 0829 in the Hampshire Regiment.

 

However I note you say the picture is only 'believed' to be Walter - does that open up the possibility that it could indeed be another family member?

 

Cheers,

Peter

 

Walter, William James (my father in law) and Harold are indeed the three brothers. Both parents died young: Walter and Harold were taken in by grandparents (his granddad William Bewsher was a policeman), William James by mother's sister's family. His uncle Gabriel got him the job at the flour mill, whereas Walter probably worked for the same sugar factory as his late father. Harold became a printer. All addresses are correct exc Brickfield is a mistranscription of Breckfield. William James served in the KLR and Gordon Highlanders and I have some details of his service. He fought on the Somme in 1917. He eventually died aged 91 in 1982. He remained a private, however, so again sergeant William Anderson is a different person, and it couldn't be him in the picture. I had wondered if the picture handed down was of one of the Gamble family (Walter's wife was one of about 11 children), but again cannot find a Sergeant Gamble in the KLR records. So we are back to Walter!

Edited by Bill Sanderson
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Bill Sanderson
Posted (edited)

I see that there was another Walter Anderson born in West Derby (Liverpool) in Q2 of 1896. He is probably a good candidate for the "other" Walter Anderson in the KLR, who joined 1914 and died in the war. He may also be the one on the school roll of honour.

 

Edited by Bill Sanderson

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PRC
8 minutes ago, Bill Sanderson said:

I had wondered if the picture handed down was of one of the Gamble family (Walter's wife was one of about 11 children), but again cannot find a Sergeant Gamble in the KLR records. So we are back to Walter!

 

May be another total co-incidence, but I see on the 1911 census that the oldest child recorded living with Gabriel & May Tyson is their son Herbert Bewsher Tyson, aged 22 and born Liverpool. He too was a Flour Millers Labourer. There is a Medal Index Card for a Serjeant 13199 Herbert B. Tyson, Liverpool Regiment. He first landed in France on the 26th September 1915. The card is noted he was deceased.

 

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission adds that Serjeant 13199 Herbert Brewsher Tyson, 13th Battalion, The Kings (Liverpool Regiment), died on the 10th February 1916, aged 27.

He was the son of Gabriel and Mary Tyson, of 20, Waltham Rd., Anfield, Liverpool. He is buried at Boulogne Eastern Cemetery.

https://www.cwgc.org/find-records/find-war-dead/casualty-details/46186/HERBERT BEWSHER TYSON/

 

Soldiers Died in the Great War adds that he died of wounds. He was born, resident and enlist Liverpool.

 

Our parent site, the Long, Long Trail, has this to say about the 13th Battalion.

 

13th (Service) Battalion
Formed at Seaforth in September 1914 as part of K3 and attached as Army Troops to 25th Division.
February 1915 : transferred to 76th Brigade in same Division.
27 September 1915 : landed at Le Havre.
15 October 1915 : transferred with Brigade to 3rd Division.
23 October 1915 : transferred to 8th Brigade in same Division.
4 April 1916 : transferred to 9th Brigade in same Division.

https://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/regiments-and-corps/the-british-infantry-regiments-of-1914-1918/kings-liverpool-regiment/

 

If you register for an account at the National Archive you can currently download unit war diaries for free. Other ranks don't usually get mentioned by name, but as a senior NCO you might stand more of a chance of finding out the circumstances of his wounding that would lead to his eventual death, almost certainly in a hospital after being medically evacuated back to the coast.

 

I believe this should be the one you need:-

https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/C7352077

 

I'm not seeing any obvious surviving service records on FindMyPast. His Army Register of Soldiers Effects, (Ancestry only) may give a tiny bit more detail about where he died, (Hospital number, etc). It's a financial ledger rather than an inventory. It will not only confirm who received the balance of his pay, but also later on his War Gratuity. The size of the War Gratuity can also be used by whizzy people here to possibly calculate when he might have enlisted.

 

No gurantee it's the same individual as the man you have a photograph of, but seems to be ticking a lot of boxes.

 

Cheers,

Peter

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Bill Sanderson
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, PRC said:

 

May be another total co-incidence, but I see on the 1911 census that the oldest child recorded living with Gabriel & May Tyson is their son Herbert Bewsher Tyson, aged 22 and born Liverpool. He too was a Flour Millers Labourer. There is a Medal Index Card for a Serjeant 13199 Herbert B. Tyson, Liverpool Regiment. He first landed in France on the 26th September 1915. The card is noted he was deceased.

 

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission adds that Serjeant 13199 Herbert Brewsher Tyson, 13th Battalion, The Kings (Liverpool Regiment), died on the 10th February 1916, aged 27.

He was the son of Gabriel and Mary Tyson, of 20, Waltham Rd., Anfield, Liverpool. He is buried at Boulogne Eastern Cemetery.

https://www.cwgc.org/find-records/find-war-dead/casualty-details/46186/HERBERT BEWSHER TYSON/

 

Soldiers Died in the Great War adds that he died of wounds. He was born, resident and enlist Liverpool.

 

Our parent site, the Long, Long Trail, has this to say about the 13th Battalion.

 

13th (Service) Battalion
Formed at Seaforth in September 1914 as part of K3 and attached as Army Troops to 25th Division.
February 1915 : transferred to 76th Brigade in same Division.
27 September 1915 : landed at Le Havre.
15 October 1915 : transferred with Brigade to 3rd Division.
23 October 1915 : transferred to 8th Brigade in same Division.
4 April 1916 : transferred to 9th Brigade in same Division.

https://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/regiments-and-corps/the-british-infantry-regiments-of-1914-1918/kings-liverpool-regiment/

 

If you register for an account at the National Archive you can currently download unit war diaries for free. Other ranks don't usually get mentioned by name, but as a senior NCO you might stand more of a chance of finding out the circumstances of his wounding that would lead to his eventual death, almost certainly in a hospital after being medically evacuated back to the coast.

 

I believe this should be the one you need:-

https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/C7352077

 

I'm not seeing any obvious surviving service records on FindMyPast. His Army Register of Soldiers Effects, (Ancestry only) may give a tiny bit more detail about where he died, (Hospital number, etc). It's a financial ledger rather than an inventory. It will not only confirm who received the balance of his pay, but also later on his War Gratuity. The size of the War Gratuity can also be used by whizzy people here to possibly calculate when he might have enlisted.

 

No gurantee it's the same individual as the man you have a photograph of, but seems to be ticking a lot of boxes.

 

Cheers,

Peter

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks for this. I have Herbert Bewsher Tyson in my family listings. He would have been Walter's cousin, but did not grow up in the same house, so not sure how a picture of him would have gone to Walter's descendants rather than William's (who did grow up with him). Interesting to know that Gabriel and Mary moved to Anfield between 1911 and 1916. That's also where William lived after his marriage in 1915 (see attached). I downloaded the war diary and it does not indicate any fighting on the day of Herbert' death, nor indeed in the period preceding. Hard for me to know what to read into this.

william james anderson florence bogie marriage 1915.jpg

Edited by Bill Sanderson
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PRC
2 hours ago, Bill Sanderson said:

Thanks for this. I have Herbert Bewsher Tyson in my family listings. He would have been Walter's cousin, but did not grow up in the same house, so not sure how a picture of him would have gone to Walter's descendants rather than William's (who did grow up with him).

 

Just looking at the basic census details the families seem quite close knit. Copies of the picture could well have been in circulation before his death and were sometimes turned into postcards for distant family members to keep in touch. Unfortunately official records are never going to tell us how the picture turned up where it did, but Herbert does fit the few things that can be gleaned from the picture itself - a Serjeant in The King's (Liverpool Regiment), round about the time of the Great War. I can't see anything on FindMyPast Newspaers, but obviously if you could find the same image in contemporary newspapers then that would be a clincher.

 

2 hours ago, Bill Sanderson said:

Interesting to know that Gabriel and Mary moved to Anfield between 1911 and 1916.

 

The Imperial War Graves Commission, the predecessor the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, didn't come into being until the early 1920's. First it had to work out what it was responsible for, then design appropriate memorials \ headstones. Part of the process involved correspondence with next of kin to agree on things like wording on a permanent headstone. Those next of kin contact details, from the mid-1920's onwards are what are shown as the additional information on the CWGC site. Gabriel and Mary may have moved earlier, but more likely it was in the 1920's.

 

2 hours ago, Bill Sanderson said:

I downloaded the war diary and it does not indicate any fighting on the day of Herbert' death, nor indeed in the period preceding. Hard for me to know what to read into this.

 

To have been medically evacuated back as far as the coast makes it harder to establish when he might have been wounded. This was also a quiet time in terms of offensives from either side. If large volumes of casualties were being experienced or anticipated then hospital occupants on the French coast would be moved on to the UK. If it was a quiet time a man could be in a hospital in France for recovery and then go to a convalescence camp elsewhere on the coast. Unfortunately only a small sample of admission and discharge books for medical facilities were retained and passed over to the National Archive. FindMyPast has subsequently scanned them but I'm not getting any matches for Herbert.

 

It's also possible he was on attached duty with another unit and so his wounding wouldn't have immediately been known to the officer writing up the Battalion War Diary. Or he could have been caught in an air raid while returning from leave. Or the Battalion War Diarist may simply have been one of those who didn't record deaths. One test would be how other deaths associated with the Battalion were recorded

 

Between the 1st January 1916 and the 10th February 1916, (when Herbert died), only two other members of the 13th Battalion appear on the CWGC database.

 

01/01/1916 Lance Corporal 19514 T. Langford. Buried Dickebusch New Military Cemetery, Flanders. \\ SDGW - as Terence "Langton" Died of Wounds. \ MiC shows as Terence Langford, deceased.

 

03/02/1916 Lieutenant James Pigott Hollins. Buried at Reninghelst New Military Cemetery, Flanders. \\ SDGW as Lieutenant & Quartermaster "Died" \ MiC also shows "Died 3-2-16"

 

Dickebusch and Reninghelst were both in the Ypres Salient.

 

Is there any mention of those two, or an incidence that could have led to the wounding of Lance Corporal Langford?

 

Cheers,

Peter

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Ken Lees
56 minutes ago, PRC said:

 

The Imperial War Graves Commission, the predecessor the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, didn't come into being until the early 1920's. First it had to work out what it was responsible for, then design appropriate memorials \ headstones. Part of the process involved correspondence with next of kin to agree on things like wording on a permanent headstone. Those next of kin contact details, from the mid-1920's onwards are what are shown as the additional information on the CWGC site. Gabriel and Mary may have moved earlier, but more likely it was in the 1920's.

 

 

The IWGC was created in 1917.

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Bill Sanderson

If the person in the photo is of Herbert Tyson, it still leaves the matter that Walter Anderson was on military service in 1919 yet absent from the records. That remains my problem! I'll post anther photo that may be of the three Anderson brothers together - though we aren't sure - but could have been taken in 1914 when they were all at Walter's wedding (the other two were witnesses). Does any of them look like the man in the photo? The other photo we think is a young William.

310657565_Andersonspicture.jpg.90d5fae4bc1078868fa241e594db93fa.jpg

William James Anderson.jpg

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Bill Sanderson
2 hours ago, PRC said:

 

J

 

Between the 1st January 1916 and the 10th February 1916, (when Herbert died), only two other members of the 13th Battalion appear on the CWGC database.

 

01/01/1916 Lance Corporal 19514 T. Langford. Buried Dickebusch New Military Cemetery, Flanders. \\ SDGW - as Terence "Langton" Died of Wounds. \ MiC shows as Terence Langford, deceased.

 

03/02/1916 Lieutenant James Pigott Hollins. Buried at Reninghelst New Military Cemetery, Flanders. \\ SDGW as Lieutenant & Quartermaster "Died" \ MiC also shows "Died 3-2-16"

 

Dickebusch and Reninghelst were both in the Ypres Salient.

 

Is there any mention of those two, or an incidence that could have led to the wounding of Lance Corporal Langford?

 

Cheers,

Peter

The Bn was at Dickebusch in December 1915 and in Reninghelst in January. The account mentions days in the trenches but no direct reference to fighting - it's purely a record of locations and movements. There was a casualty on 29th December, a L/Cpl Simpkins. I think as you suggest Herbert was wounded a few weeks before he died in the hospital at Boulogne, this having been some way from the front line.

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PRC
31 minutes ago, Bill Sanderson said:

 I'll post anther photo that may be of the three Anderson brothers together - though we aren't sure - but could have been taken in 1914 when they were all at Walter's wedding (the other two were witnesses). Does any of them look like the man in the photo?

310657565_Andersonspicture.jpg.90d5fae4bc1078868fa241e594db93fa.jpg

 

 

I'm no expert but if asked to date that picture I'd guess at the 1920's or 1930's, not August 1914. If that's correct and the picture is much later then calls in to doubt the identification as being the three Anderson brothers. I can see some physical similarities in the individuals in this photo, the one you think is the young William and the original photo posted, but it's not unusual for cousins to have similar physical traits.

 

10 minutes ago, Bill Sanderson said:

The Bn was at Dickebusch in December 1915 and in Reninghelst in January. The account mentions days in the trenches but no direct reference to fighting - it's purely a record of locations and movements. There was a casualty on 29th December, a L/Cpl Simpkins. I think as you suggest Herbert was wounded a few weeks before he died in the hospital at Boulogne, this having been some way from the front line.

 

Thanks for checking. I take it there is no appendices for January or February showing casualties - usually number by type by day, rather than a list of individuals. If it's not there as an Appendix then sometimes it turns up as a report in the Brigade War Diary or even the Divisional one. Sadly in my experience many battalion war diaries don't record the daily attrition of life in the trenches for other ranks but will get vastly over-excited if even the most junior officer splits a nail or returns from\goes on leave - only exception will normally be the quartermaster who was usually promoted from the ranks, which is probably why Lieutenant Hollins doesn't get a mention.

 

Cheers,

Peter

 

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Bill Sanderson

Just off on another tack now. If the person in KLR uniform is actually Sgt Herbert Bewsher Tyson as has been suggested, we aren't sure that Walter Anderson was in the KLR - only that he was in the army in 1919, and was probably conscripted in 1916 as there were no children until 1921.

Walter's brother Harold served in the Royal Field Artillery, 4th (West Lancs) Howitzer Brigade, from 1911 until 1916 when he was invalided out. Would it be possible to look for Walter in this regiment, please?

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Ken Lees
57 minutes ago, Bill Sanderson said:

Just off on another tack now. If the person in KLR uniform is actually Sgt Herbert Bewsher Tyson as has been suggested, we aren't sure that Walter Anderson was in the KLR - only that he was in the army in 1919, and was probably conscripted in 1916 as there were no children until 1921.

Walter's brother Harold served in the Royal Field Artillery, 4th (West Lancs) Howitzer Brigade, from 1911 until 1916 when he was invalided out. Would it be possible to look for Walter in this regiment, please?

 

If he was conscripted then it's unlikely he would have been in the King's Liverpool Regiment - well, no more likely than any other unit. Men weren't given a choice once conscription came in.

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Bill Sanderson
18 minutes ago, Ken Lees said:

 

If he was conscripted then it's unlikely he would have been in the King's Liverpool Regiment - well, no more likely than any other unit. Men weren't given a choice once conscription came in.

Is there any way of finding him that I haven't already tried? We have his home address and date of birth. His brother - my father in law - was in one of the Liverpool Scottish battalions of the KLR - his father was born in Scotland so I assumed that explained it! But we have not found Walter.

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BillyH
7 minutes ago, Bill Sanderson said:

His brother - my father in law - was in one of the Liverpool Scottish battalions of the KLR - his father was born in Scotland so I assumed that explained it! 

 

There was only one Scottish Battalion - the 10th.

 

BillyH.

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