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lucycutler

Medical term 'Int Der' ??

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lucycutler

Hi, I am trying to decipher this item of medical terminology, namely 'Int Der Right knee'.  The patient was subsequently listed as having Synovitis of the right knee.  I found that ok on the internet but Int Der eludes me!  Any help gratefully received pls.

Lucy 

 

 

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Michelle Young

Intra Dermal? Without seeing the document, a shot in the dark.....

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lucycutler
34 minutes ago, Michelle Young said:

Intra Dermal? Without seeing the document, a shot in the dark.....

Hi Michelle, sorry about that!  I tried to copy and paste the document but it didn't work.  :(

I've done a couple of screen shots, hopefully you can read them ok! 

015.jpg.79962c5d0a7bdd8c663f781fc78d6d35.jpg

 

014.jpg.f6b43617bdd8e090ef6ce4f49346c817.jpg   

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ss002d6252

Internal derangement of the knee ?

 

Craig

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Michelle Young

@Dai Bach y Sowldiwr can you hep please?

Thanks, Michelle

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Dai Bach y Sowldiwr

Yes, as Craig said.

Internal Derangement Knee.

 

Not to be confused with the abbreviation 'IDK'.

Which means the writer doesn't have a clue what's wrong with the patient.

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lucycutler

Thank you all, Internal Derangement it is then  :thumbsup:

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Robert Dunlop

It is always worth checking if a medical term, as understood today, meant the same thing or was even used at that time. A quick search of the BMJ Archive revealed the following report from a surgical hospital in Tidmouth, published in May 1918. Bearing in mind that this is a small subset of cases that presented with the symptoms and signs of internal derangement of the knee, it is interesting to note the references to the relative scale of the problem and to the two causes:

 

Quote

Since September, 1916, it has been found advisable to segregate the knee cases, owing to the large number, principally the result of football accidents, but at one time a number of injured knees followed trench training. There has been on an average at least twenty cases in hospital daily suffering from derangements of the knee-joint the result of injury.

 

Robert

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lucycutler

Thank you Robert, a good point  :)

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