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Remembered Today:

Cymro

These boots could still pass parade!

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Cymro

 I just brought my early (1915) pattern Boots, Field, Mounted Services out for their yearly cleaning - PEL leather saver, some preserver and then a polish off with Renaissance wax. Wouldn't shame a parade ground even after 105 years.

 

I absolutely love these boots (Tocemma will recognise them). About to put them on a mannequin display. Thought I'd post for reference.

 

 

 

Boots1.jpg

Boots2.jpg

Boots3.jpg

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JMB1943

Cymro,

 

A lovely pair of boots, indeed!

Small feet though, are they about a size 6?

I’m familiar with and use Renaissance Wax myself, and I will look up PEL, but what preserver do you use?

Also, what good shape the straps and laces are in.

Are they hob-nailed like regular marching boots?

Regards,

JMB

Edited by JMB1943

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reese williams

I'm sure someone will immediately post a picture of hob-nailed cavalry boots as soon as I say this, but normally cavalry boots would not be hob-nailed to avoid the hobnails fouling in the stirrup. You want a smooth sole so you can position your foot properly easily an quickly. Once they were dismounted and being used as infantry it is possible troopers were issued infantry style boots. I'm sure someone will know.

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Coldstreamer

not pass a guards parade :P but they are in great condition for their age

 

Im guessing as people were shorter back then that feet were too

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Cymro

The boots are about a size 7 actually - they appear a bit foreshortened in the photo. Yes indeed, no hobnails in these, as one would expect in most cases of this type of boot. The PEL I refer to is the company Preservation Equipment Limited which makes a wonderful array of leather preservation products - worth checking out!

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Andrew Upton
9 hours ago, reese williams said:

I'm sure someone will immediately post a picture of hob-nailed cavalry boots as soon as I say this, but normally cavalry boots would not be hob-nailed to avoid the hobnails fouling in the stirrup. You want a smooth sole so you can position your foot properly easily an quickly. Once they were dismounted and being used as infantry it is possible troopers were issued infantry style boots. I'm sure someone will know.

 

Not a picture, but... :hypocrite:

 

"...Be careful of assigning that Cavalry only wore boots hobnailed at the toe and full hobnails are for Infantry.

 

If pre-war practice had been maintained this would not have been reality and in fact this is more appropriate for extremely late war (only as an unaccounted for incident) and postwar.

 

In fact there was a conference held at GHQ in France in July 1918 between "RACD Boots" and the BEF Quartermaster types. At this conference the BEF quartermaster types brought up that they had concerns over the increasing issue of full hobnailed boots. They were finding out that they were receiving complaints from the mounted arm issued these boots. The mounted arm was saying that they were discovering that these boots were not as suitable for mounted use. This was actually a surprise for the "RACD Boots" representative and an indication that at the time there was absolutely no differentiation in boot issue between mounted and dismounted troops.

 

To address this issue RACD Boots said further shipments of boots to France would be at the ratio of 35% "Billed" soles and 65% "Hobbed" soles. This was meant to ensure enough billed sole boots for mounted troops and probably had zero affect on issues during the war.

 

It was not until 1920 that "Billed" soles were specifically designated for issue to mounted troops and "hobbed" soles to dismounted troops. This was dropped in 1924 when all boots again were manufactured with billed soles only..."

 

 

 

Edited by Andrew Upton

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tullybrone

Nice boots.

 

I have my RFA Driver gf’s spurs.... but unfortunately not his boots:)

 

Steve

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mark holden

A lovely pair Jon thanks for sharing.

 

Mark

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Grovetown

Not bad Jonathan, not bad. Very good in fact!


Still slightly favour my 1916 pair on the whole though. 

 

Cheers,

 

GT.

 

 

OR Mounted #2.jpg

OR Mounted #4.jpg

OR Mounted #5.jpg

OR Mounted #6.jpg

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mark holden

Quality GT just quality!

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Cymro

Damn and blast Johnny, you just wander into this thread with the best example of a pair of boots I’ve ever seen without so much as a by your leave.

 

You’re off my Christmas card list, you bounder.

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depaor01
51 minutes ago, Cymro said:

Christmas card list

 :w00t: :doh:

 

Dave

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wainfleet

I recognise those boots! A tenner from Charing Cross market in the early 80s, one of my bargains in the days when such things were possible. Always good to see an old friend.

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Grovetown
15 hours ago, Cymro said:

Damn and blast Johnny, you just wander into this thread with the best example of a pair of boots I’ve ever seen without so much as a by your leave.

 

You’re off my Christmas card list, you bounder.


Sorry mate - every now and then my inner smug git gets the better of me!

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Cymro

Thoroughly warranted in this case pal. They're pearlers.

 

Wainfleet - tenner from Charing Cross?  Fair play, you must have skipped home.

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wainfleet
1 hour ago, Cymro said:

Wainfleet - tenner from Charing Cross?  Fair play, you must have skipped home.

 

They were in with a lot of WW2 dispatch rider boots. Now and again Charing Cross turned up some amazing bargains. WW1 tam-o-shanter for £5, another with its paper label for £10, somebody with a big bag of WW1 chinstraps £1 each, Cheshire Colonel's cuff rank for £2....happy days, when collecting this stuff was actually a joy that didn't require a second mortgage! We shall not see their like again.

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mark holden

I remember it well and with great fondness, a few bargains were had but sadly I was not collecting Great War artefacts at the time.

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Cymro

I snagged only one thing from there a Welsh Div stretcher bearers grouping that I cherish to this day.

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