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Remembered Today:

Help in Identifying marks on shell casing


Catherine Mary

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In reading answers to similar questions I learned that 

A. RS. means Atelier de Construction de Rennes

L 200 means Lot 200

16 - I'm guessing this means 1916 What does the D mean after the number?

75 DE C means 75mm De Campagne or 75mm Field Gun

 

However, there is also an SD stamped and I don't know what that stands for.  Hope someone can explain. Thanks, Cathy

n6MulPXVS26FgTqmw8gRJA.jpg.fad96e7f481e959868f24b4765e798b2.jpg

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D = December?

 

Mike.

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The D represents the supplier of the metal (brass) for the casing. I believe it is Atelier de Fabrication, Douai, but an expert on French casings might have a different answer.

 

The SD is most likely an inspector's stamp stamped on at final inspection of the empty case.

 

It is nice to see someone using the search facility and doing most of the work upfront...

 

 

265

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SD   Compagnie Francaise des Metaux, Saint Denis.

 

Mike.

Edited by MikeyH
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Thanks for such quick replies. 

I now have two explanations each for the letters I don't understand...haha.

I must admit I'm hoping a third reply can verify either MikeyH's or 14276265's answers for the D and the SD.

 

Cathy

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On ‎26‎/‎08‎/‎2019 at 04:12, Catherine Mary said:

I now have two explanations each for the letters I don't understand...

 

Head stamps generally have a defined format. For the French 75 DEC, the cartridge case maker's monogram is followed by the Lot number, then the year of manufacture, then the monogram of the metal provider. Below at top is a clear and straightforward one - case made by MGM (Manufacture Generale Munitions - Bourg/Valence), brass supplied by BX (Etablissement DSA, Clichy).

 

At bottom, not so clear, but the case maker is a common one PDPs (Pinchart Deny, Paris), and the brass supplier is indeed SD (Compagnie Francaise des Metaux, St-Denys).

 

Randomly placed markings in different sizes and styles of type face tend to be refill marks and inspection and acceptance marks. To be honest I do not know what the small type face SD on your case is. It may be related to CFM, St-Denys, it may not, but it's a detail that probably requires someone with in-depth knowledge of French casings.

 

Regarding the tables on the Western Front Museum website, a little caution is needed as there are some common mistakes (a couple of examples being the decodes of EOC and VSM British monograms).

 

 

265

DeC cart 2.jpg

DeC cart 3.jpg

Edited by 14276265
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On 26/08/2019 at 03:57, Michael Haselgrove said:

Hi Cathy,

Here is a website and if you work your way down you will find a reference to SD:

 https://ator1149.home.xs4all.nl/wfm/ww1/ammunition2.html

Regards,

Michael.

okay....asked the tech folks and they told me how to continue our conversation.  I've just copied my questions and hope they aren't against the rules. It seems if I can ask about markings, I should be able to ask what the item is inside the bottom of the shell.  Here's what I sent to you earlier & hope you can respond.  If not, I'll try elsewhere.  Thanks, Catherine

 

Now I'm wondering how to know which city performed which part of the making of the shell - or does that matter?

And I noticed there is something in the bottom of the shell - looks like a couple of inches tall, skinny and hollow.  What is that?

Catherine

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On 27/08/2019 at 05:23, 14276265 said:

 

Head stamps generally have a defined format. For the French 75 DEC, the cartridge case maker's monogram is followed by the Lot number, then the year of manufacture, then the monogram of the metal provider. Below at top is a clear and straightforward one - case made by MGM (Manufacture Generale Munitions - Bourg/Valence), brass supplied by BX (Etablissement DSA, Clichy).

 

At bottom, not so clear, but the case maker is a common one PDPs (Pinchart Deny, Paris), and the brass supplier is indeed SD (Compagnie Francaise des Metaux, St-Denys).

 

Randomly placed markings in different sizes and styles of type face tend to be refill marks and inspection and acceptance marks. To be honest I do not know what the small type face SD on your case is. It may be related to CFM, St-Denys, it may not, but it's a detail that probably requires someone with in-depth knowledge of French casings.

 

Regarding the tables on the Western Front Museum website, a little caution is needed as there are some common mistakes (a couple of examples being the decodes of EOC and VSM British monograms).

 

 

265

DeC cart 2.jpg

DeC cart 3.jpg

THANK YOU very much for your explanation.  I really have learned alot about my item.  Now I just need to find someone who wants to make a fabulous piece of Trench Art!

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