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Remembered Today:

Band boy's progress as an adult


Moonraker
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Just acquired this card for £1.65. (Thank goodness for a sensible vendor who didn't start off with a price of £11.99 or more on the off-chance that a descendant of Cyril Langdon might spot it and buy it.)

image.png.6da65397abbbfac9e67aae6a583467f6.png

 

Happily, Googling led to the fascinating story of Trumpeter Henry Donovan of the 4th Dragoon Guards  showing his career before and during the war, but what sort of progress would a boy bandsman of 1913 (?) have expected? Would he have continued as an adult bandsman or was their a chance that with the increasing need for fit men he would have been moved to a more combative unit?

 

Indeed, were bandsmen in general liable to such a move during the war?

 

Moonraker

Edited by Moonraker
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Yes, you're right. It'll teach me to read it sideways.  I've done the necessary edit. Thanks.

 

Moonraker

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If I recall correctly, the first British shot of the war was actually fired by a corporal bandsman in a cavalry regiment.

 

Ron

Edit: it was indeed, and in the very same regiment!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Thomas_(British_Army_soldier)

Edited by Ron Clifton
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1 hour ago, Moonraker said:

Just acquired this card for £1.65. (Thank goodness for a sensible vendor who didn't start off with a price of £11.99 or more on the off-chance that a descendant of Cyril Langdon might spot it and buy it.)

image.png.6da65397abbbfac9e67aae6a583467f6.png

 

Happily, Googling led to the fascinating story of Trumpeter Henry Donovan of the 4th Dragoon Guards  showing his career before and during the war, but what sort of progress would a boy bandsman of 1916 have expected? Would he have continued as an adult bandsman or was their a chance that with the increasing need for fit men he would have been moved to a more combative unit?

 

Indeed, were bandsmen in general liable to such a move during the war?

 

Moonraker

I think he was possibly #8476 Cyril Bailey Langdon who enlisted 10 Nov 13 aged 15yrs and 141 days. Discharged to commission in 1923.
https://search.findmypast.co.uk/record?id=GBM%2FTANK%2F015%2F073&parentid=GBM%2FTANK%2F013076

 

Craig

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Looks very plausible. But I wonder if not only did I misread his first name but also the postmark date. In my opening post I suggested that this was 30 July 1916, but the card's vendor thought that it might be 1913 - which would make it four months before Langdon enlisted. So perhaps 1915??

 

My notes (compiled 20 years ago) read: "4th Dragoon Guards: Assaye barracks, left for France with BEF, August 14, 1914; with 7th Dragoon Guards at Tidworth in mid-1915; by January 1917 more than 700 men had left for service as infantry)".

 

I thought that this might mean that during the war Tidworth remained the depot for the 4th Dragoon Guards, but the Long Long Trail tells me that the 2nd Reserve Regiment of Cavalry "formed August 1914 at Tidworth. Trained men for the 4th and 7th Dragoon Guards, Warwickshire Yeomanry, Gloucestershire Yeomanry and Worcestershire Yeomanry. Was absorbed into new 6th Reserve Regiment early in 1917."

 

Ever the pedant, I wonder if it might be a shade more accurate to say "Trained men of the 4th ...".

 

Moonraker

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July 13 would be too early and July 16 too late (as he'd be 18) so July 15 would fit nicely.

Craig

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His regiment have a personal photo album - click for album

 

He was a Colonel by 1945 with DSO and OBE

 

Cyril Bailey Langdon was born on 23rd May 1898.  He was in the ranks for 9 years and 246 days until he was commissioned 2nd Lieutenant with the 2nd Battalion, King’s Own Royal Regiment on 14th July 1923. Promoted Lieutenant 14th July 1925. Attached to the Royal Army Service Corps on Rhine, 1925. Transferred to Royal Army Service Corps 1927. Major, Royal Army Service Corps, 1st August 1938. Temporary Lieutenant Colonel 14th May 1941 to 23rd December 1945. ADST SEAC, 26th March 1945. DDST, SEAC, 24th June 1945 to 19th November 1945. War Substantive Lieutenant Colonel 24th December 1945. Acting Colonel 24th June 1943 to 24th October 1945. (Lieutenant Colonel 7th June 1943) Temporary Colonel 24th December 1945. Awarded DSO and OBE for services in Burma.

Album of photographs taken and including Lieutenant Cyril Bailey Langdon in India with the KORR during the 1920s

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17 hours ago, Moonraker said:

 

 

Ever the pedant, I wonder if it might be a shade more accurate to say "Trained men of the 4th ...".

 

Moonraker

 

Probably not, actually. I suspect they would be trained, and, when ready, despatched to any on of the regiments on the list. Therefore, they would not have been 'of' the 4th DG until trained and allocated.

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20 hours ago, Moonraker said:

... Ever the pedant, I wonder if it might be a shade more accurate to say "Trained men of the 4th ...".

 

Moonraker

 

2 hours ago, Steven Broomfield said:

 

Probably not, actually. I suspect they would be trained, and, when ready, despatched to any on of the regiments on the list. Therefore, they would not have been 'of' the 4th DG until trained and allocated.

Interesting, I haven't come across that before. Steven's opinion is confirmed by the


Long Long Trail

 

" Men who enlisted into the cavalry, either as volunteers or conscripts, served with the cavalry reserve to carry out their basic training. Many were not, however, posted to a cavalry regiment overseas but were converted into infantry or other corps before being sent there. It is rare to see a cavalry reserve unit being mentioned in a man’s medal records, even if the man had trained with them. "

 

Thanks to everyone who has provided so much fascinating info. I was after some general guidance, but it's always gratifying when GWF members dig around - and discover that an apparently humble addressee went on to a distinguished army career.

 

Moonraker

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