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Steve1871

Gew.98. Odd markings?

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Steve1871

Two markings, odd to me, the "Tall" Eagle on bolt handle, and on side of Reciever,Common to see a few crowns over gothic letters in a row. On mine here, the first one is a crown over block letters RO, the rest are in Gothic, I have never seen this before?Any idea's guy's ?  It also nice to have an S97aA  99' to go with it, no, not matching

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The Prussian

Hello!

It´s not  RO, it´s RC. That means "Revisions-Commission".

That was  working group of acceptance officers, who had to decide whether to accept or rectify weapons which were the subject of a complaint.

The eagle means "Barrel fired with the lock" (I hope the translation was right... In german: "Lauf mit Schloß beschossen")

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trajan

Andy has the RC marking interpreted correctly, also the other one, but I guess something like "barrel fired with bolt locked" or "barrel fired with bolt in place".

 

There is a very nice set of markings Steve! There is a whole page in the regulations explaining what they mean and when they were applied, but the three inspection marks in sequence on the receiver (reading from the right, the start), "barrel with bolt test-fired"; "barrel and bolt finished"; "receiver hardened"; and then "Revisons Control". The same style markings on a Kar.98 by the way follow a slightly different sequence...

 

Julian

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Steve1871

Acceptance officers, subject of a complaint? Like if gun was pulled off production line for a default ?

To me, it still is marking's I have never seen before , and I love the 1899 date, not sure if production began in 98 or 99

thank you both for your help here Julian and Andy, right?

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Steve1871

The unit disc, I think means 

10th Pioneer Division 4th company 219th weapon

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The Prussian

Hello!

Well, I translated it with a tralslator.

Originally it is "Abnehmebeamter"

The unit is 4th company of Pionier-Bataillon 10, weapon 219

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trajan

The full-length Technical University at Chemnitz dictionary says Abnehmebeamter = "Authorised inspector", so "Acceptance officer" is fair enough! 

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trajan
5 hours ago, Steve1871 said:

The unit disc, I think means 

10th Pioneer Division 4th company 219th weapon

 

Overlooked this one... (Hannoversches) Pionier-Bataillon Nr.10, 4 Kompagnie, Waffe 219. According to German Wiki, in August 1914 they were attached to 2 Garde-Reserve-Division, X Reserve Korps, 2 Armee.

 

A photo at: https://www.flickr.com/photos/paranoid_womb/5824856282/

 

Another at:https://www.flickr.com/photos/drakegoodman/3099204089/ indicates they had S.98/05 by 1915 - sawbacks of course, originally issued only to Pionieren and Telegraphen troops!

 

 

 

 

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Steve1871

Thanks again guys, big help . So they were a Hannover unit, 

before 1870, Hannover was an actual ( small) German state right?

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The Prussian
Posted (edited)

A little bit earlier... The kingdom of Hannover lost its independence in 1866

Edited by The Prussian

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trajan

It was part of GB until Queen Victoria came along - if she had been born a chap and became King Victor, then it would have remained a part of the British Empire! Hannoverian law meant that as a female she could not be ruler of the country and so off it went to one of ther cousins...

 

Hannoverian troops played a major part in the American Revolution, the capture of Gibraltar (which is why one WW1 German unit had "Gibraltar" cuff titiles), and at Waterloo, and there is a superb Victory Monument in Hannover to commemorate that!

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The Prussian
Posted (edited)

Right Julian!

This photo has nothing to do with the actual thread, but in a case yet...

We see General Louis Heinrich Sichart v. Sichartshoff (*1797, + 1882).This man was from Hanover and he served 1815 in the King´s German Legion in Waterloo!

Later he became Chief of Staff in the Kingdom of Hanover!

When do you see a photo from a man who fought in 1815 and maybe had seen Napoléon????

 

 

General  Sichart v. Sichartshoff.jpg

Edited by The Prussian

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Steve1871

I love this military history guys . Thanks 

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trajan

Great photograph Andy, thanks!

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The Prussian
Posted (edited)

Here is the ranklist from 1816!

He and his brother served in the KGL. Both in the 2nd Line-Bataillon.

Ludewig is the german form of Louis

 

Screenshot (95).jpg

Edited by The Prussian

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Michael Thomson

Fascinating thread everybody...thank you all for posting.

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Steve1871

Thank's again Julian and Andy, it is Amazing what you two can bring up on what seem's like such a simple looking unit Mark.

 

To me, it brings the unit to life so to speak. It's great!😀

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