Jump to content
Great War Forum

Remembered Today:

Sign in to follow this  
History Hunter

Did Arthur Hunt marry an Australian nurse?

Recommended Posts

History Hunter

I am researching Private Arthur Cecil Hunt service number 36445 10th Bn Worcestershire Regiment who died of wounds on 17/10/1917. He is buried at Outtersteene Communal Cemetery Extensions, Bailleul. Hunt lived in Netley Marsh, Hampshire and was single when he went to war. He seems to have married during the war and his wife seems to have been Australian. Louise Annabel Cecil Hunt appears in New South Wales in 1924 and again in Warringah in 1949 (according to another website). The CWGC states that the 1st Australian Casualty Station was operating in this area at this time – could he have married a nurse? Can anyone suggest please how I might go about researching this theory further? Many thanks.

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Neil 2242

There's a 1916 marriage between Arthur C Hunt and Louise A [Hunt] in St Germans district in Cornwall......a possible?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
IPT
53 minutes ago, Neil 2242 said:

There's a 1916 marriage between Arthur C Hunt and Louise A [Hunt] in St Germans district in Cornwall......a possible?

 

I think you're right

 

29/10/1918 - Goulburn Evening Penny Post

 

hunt.jpg

 

11/3/1918 -  The Sydney Morning Herald

 

hunt2.jpg.6ef4377cfbea49d5b1163d4f56c188b4.jpg

Edited by IPT

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
History Hunter

Thank you Neil and IPT! 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ForeignGong

Hi

If she was a nurse in AANS, once she married she would have had to resign, as the nurses had to be single. Stupid rule, as when people get together, romance always sticks its head in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
History Hunter
6 hours ago, ForeignGong said:

Hi

If she was a nurse in AANS, once she married she would have had to resign, as the nurses had to be single. Stupid rule, as when people get together, romance always sticks its head in.

 

Yes, good point. Are there many instances of nurses marrying soldiers? The Cornwall link is puzzling perhaps she had family there. Any idea how I can find out her maiden name and track down whether she was a nurse please? 

Edited by History Hunter
Text added

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Neil 2242

Her maiden name appears to have been Hunt as well (see marriage register and the first notice found above by IPT).

 

If she was a nurse in the Australian service, then I imagine there should be service papers. Australian records are online.

 

Edited by Neil 2242

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
frev

Hi History Hunter

 

Louise Annabel Hunt definitely wasn’t a Nurse.  However, I was interested to find out if she took part in any war work whilst in the UK, as I didn’t have her in my database of women who did.  So far I haven’t been able to find any details of her doing so – but have attached here what I have found whilst on the journey (for your interest).

 

Cheers, Frev

 

 

HUNT, Louisa Annabella

CECIL-HUNT, Louise Annabel

 

Louisa Annabella HUNT was born on the 28th of March 1871 at the family residence, City Tea Mart, Goulburn, NSW – the eldest daughter of Arthur Moses HUNT and Mary Jane WILSON, who married in Sydney in 1870.  Her father Arthur died in 1880, aged 36, leaving Mary a widow with six young children.  Following his death, Mary carried on his Goulburn business of Grocer and Manufacturer of baking powder.  Mary died in October 1911 at Goulburn, aged 67.

 

Louise was educated at Goulburn Technical College

Occupation: Wood Carver, Artist and Art and Crafts Teacher

 

Louise A. HUNT (Australian, giving her age as 35) embarked on the New York in New York, USA, and arrived at Liverpool, UK 16/7/1916 (address: 55 London Rd, Southampton)

[UK Incoming Passenger List]

 

She married Arthur Cecil HUNT Oct-Dec Qtr 1916 St Germans, Cornwall

He died of wounds at a Casualty Clearing Station in France 17/10/1917

 

She returned to Australia by the Niagara in October 1918

 

Resident of Wharf Rd, Longueville, NSW in 1924

1930, 1936 Electoral Rolls: Louise Annabel Cecil-Hunt, 130 Raglan Street, Mosman, Art and Craft Worker

 

Following a year abroad, Louise returned to Australia with her niece Rae towards the end of 1937

[Daughter of her brother Edward Wilson HUNT]

 

Mrs Louise HUNT (giving her age as 60) and Miss Rae HUNT (Typist, age 29) returned to Sydney on the Esperance Bay, departing Southampton on the 6/10/1937

 

Resident of Cremorne 1939

1949 ER: Louise Annabel Cecil-Hunt, 8 Reed St, (Cremorne) Neutral Bay, Home Duties

 

Louisa Annabella CECIL-HUNT died on the 18th of June 1954 at her residence 8 Reed St, Cremorne, and was cremated at the Northern Suburbs Crematorium on the 21st

 

 

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW), Sat 15 Apr 1871 (p.1):

BIRTHS

On the 28th March, at her residence, City Tea Mart, Goulburn, Mrs A.M. HUNT, of a daughter.

 

Goulburn Herald (NSW), Fri 30 Jun 1899 (p.2):

DEPARTURE OF MISS LOUIE HUNT

This lady left Goulburn on Wednesday last with the intention of opening a studio in Sydney for teaching the art of wood-carving.  Being a Goulburn native, we join in wishing her every success.  It may be mentioned that she is one of the most distinguished students of the Technical College.  She possesses what many persons who are styled geniuses lack, and that is perseverance.  This quality is perhaps the most serviceable among the attributes of human nature.  It has been remarked that the great difference between man and man is lack of or an abundance of energy.  Miss Hunt has simply availed herself of the advantages with reach; she is probably the most capable artist, both as a painter and a wood-carver, that Goulburn has produced, and this success is the result of persistent study and practice from the very foundation.  She has successfully studied freehand, model, geometrical, and perspective drawing; and she has also achieved some success in flower-painting from nature.  She has also spent time in the graver studies of chemistry, geology, mineralogy, and physics.  Goulburn residents will probably be pleased as well as proud to hear of Miss Hunt’s further success in the wider field of the metropolis.

 

Goulburn Herald (NSW), Mon 9 Oct 1899 (p.4):

MISS LOUISE HUNT

Among all this profusion of voices, it is quite a relief to come across someone working quietly with her fingers (say Goulli Goulli in last week’s Sydney Bulletin).  A visit to Miss Louise Hunt’s studio shows you what a mistake it is to jeer at the solidity of a block of wood, for her wood carvings are beautiful, and highly decorative.  The native beech is Miss Hunt’s favorite material.  Her chairs and tables are treated in a fine free way, and their high market-value adds to their interest in society’s eyes.  Miss Hunt teaches designs, and executes commissions at her studio in Paling’s Buildings.

 

Goulburn Herald (NSW), Fri 23 Mar 1900 (p.2):

PERSONAL

Miss Louise Hunt of Goulburn, who is teaching wood and chip carving in Sydney, intends forming a branch class at Parramatta, from which place she has received many promises of support.

 

The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW), Mon 26 Mar 1900 (p.3):

EXHIBITION OF WOOD-CARVING

An interesting exhibition of wood-carving was opened in the Parramatta School of Arts on Saturday evening, and was visited by a large number of the people of the district.  The exhibits were the work of Miss Louise Hunt, who contemplates establishing classes in the town, and her pupils.  Many of them showed a high degree of excellence, and the pupil’s work – notably that of young ladies in their first and second quarters – showed surprisingly rapid progress.  Miss Hunt was present, and personally explained details to visitors in a pleasant, chatty fashion.

 

Camden News (NSW), Thur 12 Jun 1913 (p.6):

Attention is directed to the notification appearing in this issue of Miss Louise Hunt’s (of Strathfield) visit to Camden at the School of Arts on Tuesday, the 17th instant.  Miss Hunt’s speciality is Arts and Crafts, of which she is an expert.

 

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW), Mon 11 Mar 1918 (p.6):

ROLL OF HONOUR

CECIL-HUNT – October 17,1917, at a casualty clearing station abroad, of wounds Arthur Cecil-Hunt, Worcestershire Regiment, aged 42, husband of Louise A. Cecil-Hunt, Laurel Bank, Totton, Hants, England, and Ripplevale, Longueville, New South Wales.

 

Goulburn Evening Penny Post (NSW), Tue 29 Oct 1918 (p.2):

PERSONAL

Mrs Louise Cecil Hunt (nee Miss L. Hunt, of Goulburn) returned to Australia by the Niagara on Friday.

 

The Sun (Sydney, NSW), Sun 31 Aug 1919 (p.15):

LYCEUM CLUB

The Sydney Lyceum Club held its annual meeting on Wednesday at …………………………………….

It was also the first appearance of Mrs Cecil Hunt since her return from England.  ……………………

 

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW), Tue 9 Dec 1919 (p.4):

WOMEN’S HANDICRAFTS ASSOCIATION

The annual exhibition of the Women’s Handicraft’s Association was opened…………………

The China painting, done by Mrs Cecil Hunt, commanded great admiration, as did………………

 

The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate (Parramatta, NSW), Thur 7 Mar 1929 (p.2):

Shifting an Easement – Benefit to Ratepayer

Mrs L.A. Cecil Hunt’s solicitor, wrote to Holroyd Council asking it to alter the position of the drainage easement in connection with her land in Lytton-street, Wentworthville.

But she wanted council to bear the expense of the alteration.

At Tuesday night’s meeting of Council, the overseer reported that if the easement were shifted it would be greatly to the benefit of the owner of the land, which could then be cut into two blocks.

Alderman Maunder said if it would give the owner so much more land it was up to her to pay the cost, which would be about £10.  He moved that the writer be informed that council will shift the easement provided the amount of the cost is paid.

Alderman Jones seconded.  Carried.

 

The Sun (Sydney, NSW), Sun 1 Aug 1937 (p.36):

WOOD-CARVING HOBBY

……………………………….. Mrs Buggy is clever with her needle, chiefly concentrating on tapestry in connection with furniture, and did a good deal of intricate work.

A friend of hers, Mrs Cecil Hunt, who is at present in England, is an expert at woodcarving and suggested one day about 12 years ago that if Mrs Buggy cared to, she might visit her and watch her at work upon a piece of furniture she was making – in fact, she might even think about watching her so carefully that it would prove a practical lesson in the art of woodcarving, which perhaps she (Mrs Buggy) might care to take up at a later date.  ……………………………..

 

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW), Thur 25 Nov 1937 (p.24):

COUNTRY SOCIAL NOTES

Miss Amy Hunt of Goulburn is in Sydney meeting her sister, Mrs L.A. Cecil Hunt and her niece, Miss Hunt, who have returned to Australia after spending 12 months abroad.

 

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW), Sat 19 Jun 1954 (p.52):

DEATHS

CECIL-HUNT, Louisa Annabella – June 18, 1954, at 8 Reed Street, Cremorne.

FUNERALS

CECIL-HUNT – The Funeral of the late LOUISA ANNABELLA CECIL-HUNT will leave Bruce Maurer’s Chapel, 281-3 Pacific Highway, North Sydney, on Monday at 10 a.m., for the Northern Suburbs Crematorium.


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Madmeg

Could they be cousins?

Arthur Cecils father was Arthur Thomas from from I can make out- who married Kate Crampton HUNT n southamton in 1868- any indictation of religious affiliations? Some of the sects tend to keep marriage within the religious group which can end up with a lot of cousins marrying each other. She could have gone over from Aus to "the old country " to stay with family and met and married Arhur C then?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
History Hunter
On 23/11/2018 at 03:26, frev said:

Hi History Hunter

 

 

 

Louise Annabel Hunt definitely wasn’t a Nurse.  However, I was interested to find out if she took part in any war work whilst in the UK, as I didn’t have her in my database of women who did.  So far I haven’t been able to find any details of her doing so – but have attached here what I have found whilst on the journey (for your interest).

 

 

 

Cheers, Frev

 

 

 

 

 

HUNT, Louisa Annabella

 

CECIL-HUNT, Louise Annabel

 

 

 

Louisa Annabella HUNT was born on the 28th of March 1871 at the family residence, City Tea Mart, Goulburn, NSW – the eldest daughter of Arthur Moses HUNT and Mary Jane WILSON, who married in Sydney in 1870.  Her father Arthur died in 1880, aged 36, leaving Mary a widow with six young children.  Following his death, Mary carried on his Goulburn business of Grocer and Manufacturer of baking powder.  Mary died in October 1911 at Goulburn, aged 67.

 

 

 

Louise was educated at Goulburn Technical College

 

Occupation: Wood Carver, Artist and Art and Crafts Teacher

 

 

 

Louise A. HUNT (Australian, giving her age as 35) embarked on the New York in New York, USA, and arrived at Liverpool, UK 16/7/1916 (address: 55 London Rd, Southampton)

 

[UK Incoming Passenger List]

 

 

 

She married Arthur Cecil HUNT Oct-Dec Qtr 1916 St Germans, Cornwall

 

He died of wounds at a Casualty Clearing Station in France 17/10/1917

 

 

 

She returned to Australia by the Niagara in October 1918

 

 

 

Resident of Wharf Rd, Longueville, NSW in 1924

 

1930, 1936 Electoral Rolls: Louise Annabel Cecil-Hunt, 130 Raglan Street, Mosman, Art and Craft Worker

 

 

 

Following a year abroad, Louise returned to Australia with her niece Rae towards the end of 1937

 

[Daughter of her brother Edward Wilson HUNT]

 

 

 

Mrs Louise HUNT (giving her age as 60) and Miss Rae HUNT (Typist, age 29) returned to Sydney on the Esperance Bay, departing Southampton on the 6/10/1937

 

 

 

Resident of Cremorne 1939

 

1949 ER: Louise Annabel Cecil-Hunt, 8 Reed St, (Cremorne) Neutral Bay, Home Duties

 

 

 

Louisa Annabella CECIL-HUNT died on the 18th of June 1954 at her residence 8 Reed St, Cremorne, and was cremated at the Northern Suburbs Crematorium on the 21st

 

 

 

 

 

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW), Sat 15 Apr 1871 (p.1):

 

BIRTHS

 

On the 28th March, at her residence, City Tea Mart, Goulburn, Mrs A.M. HUNT, of a daughter.

 

 

 

Goulburn Herald (NSW), Fri 30 Jun 1899 (p.2):

 

DEPARTURE OF MISS LOUIE HUNT

 

This lady left Goulburn on Wednesday last with the intention of opening a studio in Sydney for teaching the art of wood-carving.  Being a Goulburn native, we join in wishing her every success.  It may be mentioned that she is one of the most distinguished students of the Technical College.  She possesses what many persons who are styled geniuses lack, and that is perseverance.  This quality is perhaps the most serviceable among the attributes of human nature.  It has been remarked that the great difference between man and man is lack of or an abundance of energy.  Miss Hunt has simply availed herself of the advantages with reach; she is probably the most capable artist, both as a painter and a wood-carver, that Goulburn has produced, and this success is the result of persistent study and practice from the very foundation.  She has successfully studied freehand, model, geometrical, and perspective drawing; and she has also achieved some success in flower-painting from nature.  She has also spent time in the graver studies of chemistry, geology, mineralogy, and physics.  Goulburn residents will probably be pleased as well as proud to hear of Miss Hunt’s further success in the wider field of the metropolis.

 

 

 

Goulburn Herald (NSW), Mon 9 Oct 1899 (p.4):

 

MISS LOUISE HUNT

 

Among all this profusion of voices, it is quite a relief to come across someone working quietly with her fingers (say Goulli Goulli in last week’s Sydney Bulletin).  A visit to Miss Louise Hunt’s studio shows you what a mistake it is to jeer at the solidity of a block of wood, for her wood carvings are beautiful, and highly decorative.  The native beech is Miss Hunt’s favorite material.  Her chairs and tables are treated in a fine free way, and their high market-value adds to their interest in society’s eyes.  Miss Hunt teaches designs, and executes commissions at her studio in Paling’s Buildings.

 

 

 

Goulburn Herald (NSW), Fri 23 Mar 1900 (p.2):

 

PERSONAL

 

Miss Louise Hunt of Goulburn, who is teaching wood and chip carving in Sydney, intends forming a branch class at Parramatta, from which place she has received many promises of support.

 

 

 

The Daily Telegraph (Sydney, NSW), Mon 26 Mar 1900 (p.3):

 

EXHIBITION OF WOOD-CARVING

 

An interesting exhibition of wood-carving was opened in the Parramatta School of Arts on Saturday evening, and was visited by a large number of the people of the district.  The exhibits were the work of Miss Louise Hunt, who contemplates establishing classes in the town, and her pupils.  Many of them showed a high degree of excellence, and the pupil’s work – notably that of young ladies in their first and second quarters – showed surprisingly rapid progress.  Miss Hunt was present, and personally explained details to visitors in a pleasant, chatty fashion.

 

 

 

Camden News (NSW), Thur 12 Jun 1913 (p.6):

 

Attention is directed to the notification appearing in this issue of Miss Louise Hunt’s (of Strathfield) visit to Camden at the School of Arts on Tuesday, the 17th instant.  Miss Hunt’s speciality is Arts and Crafts, of which she is an expert.

 

 

 

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW), Mon 11 Mar 1918 (p.6):

 

ROLL OF HONOUR

 

CECIL-HUNT – October 17,1917, at a casualty clearing station abroad, of wounds Arthur Cecil-Hunt, Worcestershire Regiment, aged 42, husband of Louise A. Cecil-Hunt, Laurel Bank, Totton, Hants, England, and Ripplevale, Longueville, New South Wales.

 

 

 

Goulburn Evening Penny Post (NSW), Tue 29 Oct 1918 (p.2):

 

PERSONAL

 

Mrs Louise Cecil Hunt (nee Miss L. Hunt, of Goulburn) returned to Australia by the Niagara on Friday.

 

 

 

The Sun (Sydney, NSW), Sun 31 Aug 1919 (p.15):

 

LYCEUM CLUB

 

The Sydney Lyceum Club held its annual meeting on Wednesday at …………………………………….

 

It was also the first appearance of Mrs Cecil Hunt since her return from England.  ……………………

 

 

 

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW), Tue 9 Dec 1919 (p.4):

 

WOMEN’S HANDICRAFTS ASSOCIATION

 

The annual exhibition of the Women’s Handicraft’s Association was opened…………………

 

The China painting, done by Mrs Cecil Hunt, commanded great admiration, as did………………

 

 

 

The Cumberland Argus and Fruitgrowers Advocate (Parramatta, NSW), Thur 7 Mar 1929 (p.2):

 

Shifting an Easement – Benefit to Ratepayer

 

Mrs L.A. Cecil Hunt’s solicitor, wrote to Holroyd Council asking it to alter the position of the drainage easement in connection with her land in Lytton-street, Wentworthville.

 

But she wanted council to bear the expense of the alteration.

 

At Tuesday night’s meeting of Council, the overseer reported that if the easement were shifted it would be greatly to the benefit of the owner of the land, which could then be cut into two blocks.

 

Alderman Maunder said if it would give the owner so much more land it was up to her to pay the cost, which would be about £10.  He moved that the writer be informed that council will shift the easement provided the amount of the cost is paid.

 

Alderman Jones seconded.  Carried.

 

 

 

The Sun (Sydney, NSW), Sun 1 Aug 1937 (p.36):

 

WOOD-CARVING HOBBY

 

……………………………….. Mrs Buggy is clever with her needle, chiefly concentrating on tapestry in connection with furniture, and did a good deal of intricate work.

 

A friend of hers, Mrs Cecil Hunt, who is at present in England, is an expert at woodcarving and suggested one day about 12 years ago that if Mrs Buggy cared to, she might visit her and watch her at work upon a piece of furniture she was making – in fact, she might even think about watching her so carefully that it would prove a practical lesson in the art of woodcarving, which perhaps she (Mrs Buggy) might care to take up at a later date.  ……………………………..

 

 

 

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW), Thur 25 Nov 1937 (p.24):

 

COUNTRY SOCIAL NOTES

 

Miss Amy Hunt of Goulburn is in Sydney meeting her sister, Mrs L.A. Cecil Hunt and her niece, Miss Hunt, who have returned to Australia after spending 12 months abroad.

 

 

 

The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW), Sat 19 Jun 1954 (p.52):

 

DEATHS

 

CECIL-HUNT, Louisa Annabella – June 18, 1954, at 8 Reed Street, Cremorne.

 

FUNERALS

 

CECIL-HUNT – The Funeral of the late LOUISA ANNABELLA CECIL-HUNT will leave Bruce Maurer’s Chapel, 281-3 Pacific Highway, North Sydney, on Monday at 10 a.m., for the Northern Suburbs Crematorium.

 

 

 

Wow thank you Frev, that's amazing! I'll take some time to go through it all and take it in over the next few days! 😀

On 23/11/2018 at 10:11, Madmeg said:

Could they be cousins?

Arthur Cecils father was Arthur Thomas from from I can make out- who married Kate Crampton HUNT n southamton in 1868- any indictation of religious affiliations? Some of the sects tend to keep marriage within the religious group which can end up with a lot of cousins marrying each other. She could have gone over from Aus to "the old country " to stay with family and met and married Arhur C then?

Good point mad meg, I'll look into it further. Thank you! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Madmeg

one thing that also strikes me- Cecil was his middle name but she seems to have adopted it as a surname. Also the little oddity of him having a brother Arthur leonard they seem to have been very fond of the name Arthur.

Edited by Madmeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Madmeg

Well I think I have found Kate Crawford Hunt mother of Arthur Cecil.

Daughter of Sarah Hunt later Sarah Incledon (stepfather Francis Incledon of Jamaica) and granddaughter of Arthur and Jane Hunt of Southampton. (Have a look on Familysearch through the census)There is a bap for a Kate to a Sarah Hunt and a Philip Henry Crampton in 1843 so it's possible that either the Crampton or the Crawford is a mis transcription.

There is a Moses Hunt son of Hugh (b c 1801) and Sarah (Sergent) - haven't yet managed to connect through to William and Jemima the parents of Arthur Moses in NSW but I'm thinking there is a lot of reusing similar names in this family....

 

... bother .. did a large edit but it has got lost- sigh Start again....

 

Trove has a death notice for Jemima Hunt Tues 27 Nov 1877 Sydney Herald

Death- 15th Nov Jemima relict of William Arthur Hunt - who is shown as being a sergeant in Governor Darling's body guard an chief constable of Parramatta. died 63

William (no Arthur) and Jemima (Evans) (Davis) married in 1834, there are a number of children on the NSW BDM site and marriage and death for Jemima. They were Louisa Annabella's grandparents.

On a cursory search I can't find a death notice for William Arthur  (1860 appears to be year of death) which might give his parents or some more details of his time in Goulburn (I was working on assumption he might be a convict- how wrong could I be :-) ) 

I have found a reference to Mr Hunt as chief constable for Goulburn in 1844.

Correction- date of death- death notice for Mr William Hunt chief constable of Goulburn in Sydney Herald Tues 4 Jan 1848 for death on 2nd leaving widow and 8 children. Much earlier than I thought! 

Family search has a tree showing him as being born 17 may 1809 Hythe HAMPSHIRE (bingo?!) but it isn't sourced and shows date of death as 1860 so don't know about its accuracy.

 

I would suggest if you have Ancestry and FMP running an advanced search on 55 London street Southampton as this was the address Louisa gave when she travelled to England- it could be a hotel or maybe it is a relatives address? You should maybe also get the marriage certificate to get residences for them and I would also try the NSW death certificates as these may have more information on occupation, parents etc than the website (although William's in 1848 may not be as much use).

I've had a look at the various Hunt families in Southampton through to the early years of the 1800's to try to establish a link and I am pretty sure there will be one but without writing out a large family tree to sort them all out I haven't been able to narrow it down.

Arthurs (not that common a name) seem to be two a penny and so are Moses(esess) 

 

Do let us know how you get on!

Edited by Madmeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
David Earley
On 24/11/2018 at 20:40, Madmeg said:

I would suggest if you have Ancestry and FMP running an advanced search on 55 London street Southampton as this was the address Louisa gave when she travelled to England- it could be a hotel or maybe it is a relatives address?

 

I too am trying to research Arthur Cecil Hunt. I first started my research in November 2017, but hit too many brick walls, so moved elsewhere. On coming back to this man, I was delighted to find this thread.

I have ordered a copy of the marriage certificate and will let you know what it says when I receive it. I'm off to France for 10 days, so it should be on my doormat on my return.

55 London Road was the residence of Arthur Cecil Hunt and his parents on the 1911 census. At some point the family moved out of Southampton to "Laurel Bank" at Calmore (now a nursing home) where brother Arthur Leonard died in 1912. Arthur Thomas (the father) is listed as living there in the 1927 Kelly's Directory although when he died in 1930 his address was given as 55 London Road.

All very confusing, and not helped by the profusion of Arthurs in the family.

David 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
David Earley
Posted (edited)

Via Ancestry, I have now traced that Arthur Cecil Hunt and Louisa Annabel Hunt had a great-grandfather in common. 

 

Arthur Cecil Hunt was the son of Arthur Thomas Hunt (1845–1930) and Kate Crampton (1842–1918), whose mother was Sarah Hunt (b. 1821), the daughter of  Arthur Hunt (b. 1779).

Louisa Annabel Hunt was the daughter of Arthur Moses Hunt (1844–1880), whose father was Sarah's brother, William Arthur Hunt (1809–1848).

 

That makes them second cousins.

 

David

Edited by David Earley
correction

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
David Earley
On 24 November 2018 at 21:40, Madmeg said:

death notice for Mr William Hunt chief constable of Goulburn in Sydney Herald Tues 4 Jan 1848 for death on 2nd leaving widow and 8 children.

This article has some details of family.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
David Earley
Posted (edited)
On 20/11/2018 at 19:15, Neil 2242 said:

There's a 1916 marriage between Arthur C Hunt and Louise A [Hunt] in St Germans district in Cornwall......a possible?

On 21/11/2018 at 06:11, History Hunter said:

The Cornwall link is puzzling perhaps she had family there

 

I now have the marriage certificate. This shows that Arthur Cecil Hunt and Louise Annabel Hunt, both ages given as 40 (although she was actually 45), married on 22 December 1916 at the parish church at Antony, in the St Germans registration district. His profession is given as "Private" and his address as Tregantle Fort. Her address is given as Longueville, NSW. Their fathers are Arthur Thomas Hunt, wine merchant, and Arthur Moses Hunt, deceased, merchant, respectively.

Tregantle Fort is a few miles from the village of Antony - he seems to have joined the 10th Battalion Worcestershire Regiment in the autumn of 1916; Tregantle Fort is mentioned quite often on the forum and seems to have been a base for the Worcestershire Regiment for many years. Thus, this link refers to the 4th Battalion coming home to Tregantle Fort in 1896.

 

David

Edited by David Earley

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Madmeg

Nice one David, thanks for the update.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
David Earley

I have now posted my biography of Cecil Hunt at http://www.sussexpeople.co.uk/private-arthur-cecil-hunt/. Please let me know if I have made any mistakes.

Is there any way of identifying the Casualty Clearing Station where he died? I assume that this was near Bailleul, close to where he was buried at Outtersteene. The CWGC says "In August 1917, during the Third Battle of Ypres, the 2nd, 53rd and 1st Australian Casualty Clearing Stations came to Outtersteene ..." so I assume that it was one of those. Are there any records available for these CCSs?

Although other biographies suggest that he was injured in the few days before his death, it seems unlikely that he would be taken 24km to obtain treatment. Any thoughts on this?

 

David 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
seaJane

Only 15 miles. Might have been the nearest suitable place there was?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...