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Rum Jars - SRD?


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I've read that the SRD on the rum jars used by the Brits stands for Service Rum - Diluted (I believe to the troops it was 'Seldom Reaches Destination'). However in Richard Holmes Men at War (AKA the firing line) it says it stands for Special Rations Department.

Anyone know which it was?

Thanks

Roger Barrow

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look to our website: there is a page on this topic: what was the SRD jar.

the link to our site is in my signature.

or www.srd1914-1918.tk

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Joe seen my horse shoe pouch topic?

any idea?

By the way is the info on our website about the SRD good? or are there errors in it?

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If I'm not mistaken, they exist in two colours :

- the ochre ones for rum

- darker brown ones for whisky, often in smaller sizes as well

CGI

and what about the ones filled with gin? and oinments? ang oil? soda?

That is a myth, the colour doesn't matter. It were multifunctional jars.

Exept some who were green (poison) and a special soda jar (blue white with soda on it), but soda was also in normal jars.

The same with German jars, they aren't all spirit, but also water and other things.

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All

Interesting thread this

What sort of quantities were the men given prior to 'going over the top'.

Rumours are that they may have been quite drunk at times.

Is this true or false - Is there definite info on this subject anywhere.

Glyn

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Official it was 1 spoon each soldier / day

so...

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Were all spirit jars issued to the British forces entitled SRD?

I have seen one with a beige body and a brown shoulder entitled on the shoulder with the name and address of the supplying company, Salutaris Water Co,Distillery,236 Fulham Road,London.The metal valve at the bottle of the jar looks a little out of place for water use.

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Thanks for the info

See even you guys don't agree what SRD stands for - which makes me feel less dim!

1/3 Pt a week! which is ( I think) 6-7 Fl Oz - at 1 Fl Oz per (table) spoonful it does seem about right. Was it issued 7 days a week or was Sunday 'dry'? - as I think many towns were at the time due to religious reasons.

Did the ration increase over the course of the war (to bolster a more conscript army and keep them 'steady'?)

I know it was 'strong' but any idea how much stronger than today's 40% ABV rum?

Sorry for all the questions!

Thanks again

Roger

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Roger,

No the ration did not increase over the war. It remained at, if allowed, 1/64th Gallon , which is 1/8 of a pint.

"If allowed" is important. Rum ration was at the discretion of the OC and not a daily rite, many units did not get a rum ration at all.

Joe Sweeney

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Hopefully, the person who posted this a while ago will come forward, but if I recall correctly someone on this website saw SRD jars in the Imperial War Museums reserve collection that had its original wax seal with Supply Reserve Depot on it. All other meanings (Seldom Reaches Destination, Soon Runs Dry, Service Rum Diluted or Demarra, etc) are false or soldiers anacronisms.

As Kristoff had already pointed out, they held various contents, such as ink and acid, but would only be used for that purpose, to avoid cross contamination (no rum in a former acid jar! :o ). I have heard of glass demi john style bottles etched with SRD being used to store battery acid.

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There are 1 gallon SRD jars indeed. They were also used for several things. Allas I don't own one...

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I have also seen in many private collections in France wooden crates used to ship tins of Bully Beef which have a 'clover' mark on them and in capitals 'SRD'. Nothing to do with 'Service Rum Diluted' there and pretty much proves the case that the letters had nothing to do with rum.

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There was certainly no entitlement to rum, so no question of a ration. Some senior commanders, or COs or even company companys emphatically denied it to their men.

For my part, I fully accept the Supply Reserve Depot definition.

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IIRC wasn't the Supply Reserve Depot the name of the Army stores at Woolwich?

Apart from Paul's description of the packing crates it seems odd the SRD mark is only generally seen on the famous jars.

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Gilles,

i saw crates of chocolate too and of other products.

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Found it! No less than Joe Sweeney has seen the red wax seal with Supply Reserve Depot:

http://1914-1918.org/forum/index.php?showt...y+reserve+depot

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