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heatherannej

R.A.M.C. Wivenhoe, Essex 1915

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heatherannej

Hello there, a friend has asked if I can find out as much as possible about this card.   Naturally, Forum members are my only hope!!    The image is not that clear but what is written on the back may help members to come up with information for me.  At the outbreak of the First World War, the first VAD Hospital to open its doors in the Colchester area was Wivenhoe (in the Infants' School) but it only existed for a short time and then the VAD members operated a Soldiers' Rest Station.  There appears to have been many soldiers billeted around the village.  Many thanks in anticipation .... Heather

WW1_RAMC_1915_Wivenhoe.jpg

WW1_RAMC_1915_Wivenhoe_Back.jpg

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Ron Clifton

The unit is 2nd (later 1/2nd) South Western Mounted Brigade Field Ambulance. Before the war its HQ was at Frome and the two sections were based at Weston-Super-Mare. At first the brigade was independent, though it probably moved to East Anglia in late 1914/early 1915. It went to Gallipoli in the autumn of 1915.

 

The new 4th Mounted Division was formed in March 1916 and one of its brigades was then based at Wivenhoe, so it is quite possible that the earlier brigade had been there or thereabouts before going to Gallipoli.

 

Ron

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jay dubaya

Hi Heather,

it could be South Wessex Mounted Brigade (Field Ambulance) RAMC which was I believe a Wiltshire TF unit.

 

Jon

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heatherannej

Thank you both, Ron and Jon ... that has helped so much.   I will pass that on to my friend.   As always, I bow to your knowledge - I much appreciate it.  Heather

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heatherannej

Hi ... as a follow-on, my friend has asked "if there is a list of men that served in the RAMC 1/2nd anywhere?"   He is not interested in any one specific man, just wants to put as much information with the photograph as possible.  Many thanks, Heather ....

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Ron Clifton

Probably not, though you may find something in the Somerset County Archives, assuming that they hold the records of the Somerset Country Territorial Force Association.

 

Ron

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heatherannej

Thanks Ron .... will pass that on.  Much obliged to you, Heather

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Honora

Dear All

 

Interesting photo. I have been researching the following man :

ADDICOTT, Charles William, Private 456028, Royal Army Medical Corps, 231 Field Ambulance, died 30 October 1918, aged 29, buried Tournai Communal Cemetery Allied Section, Plot V, Row G, Grave 8.

His service record and the war diary are  on Ancestry.

Heather - might your friend let me use this photo as illustration is my text - which will be part of a local history talk and presentation in November? (ie not for commercial publication)

 

These are some extracts from my research - please, anyone, if I have made any errors - let me know.

 

He was working as a gardener for Mr William Brookes, Weston-super-Mare, and living in Alma Street, when he attested in the town for the 2nd South Western Mounted Brigade, Field Ambulance on 3 Nov 1913. Private Addicott, 1789 was 24 years and 8 months; slim built and 5 ft 7 ½ in in height.

The Western Daily Press reported on 7 August that the RAMC, 2nd South Western Mounted Brigade Field Ambulance had returned to their Frome Headquarters from Camp at the beginning of the week for the purpose of mobilisation. The men from Bath and Weston-super-Mare were billeted at various inns in the town. The same report added the military authorities were buying up all the available horses in the district and the ladies of the Red Cross Detachments were working busily.  

 After mobilisation, Charles and his unit spent the next year at Colchester, Essex - Wivenhoe is about three miles outside Colchester 

 The 1st /2ndSouth Western Mounted Brigade, composed of three yeomanry units, a signals troop and the field ambulance embarked at Liverpool for Gallipoli on 23 September 1915, arriving at their destination on 3 October, according to the Bath Chronicle (16 Oct 1915), who left it to their readers  to work out the destination

In early 1916 the Brigade was withdrawn to Egypt, where it served as part of the Suez Canal defences.

In January 1917 organisational changes were made throughout the Territorial units.  The men were given new six figure regimental numbers. Field Ambulances of the Welsh Border and South West Mounted Brigades became the 231st Field Ambulance, 74th Division; and moved to Palestine.

There was a great need for more men on the Western Front in the spring of 1918.  The 74th Division was relieved in March 1918.  Moving to Alexandria via Kantara, the Division set sail on HMT Canberra, under escort. They landed at Marseilles on 7 May 1918 and entrained for the north. 

The 231st Field Ambulance followed closely behind, during the final advance in Artios and Flanders. 

The War Diary recorded

30/10/18 H E shell in Cook House and Food Stores, Drs Cruddas & Marshall, Corpl Davies, L Corpl Barrow, Pts Addicott, Baker G, & White B C killed. L Corpl Howley, Pts Jones A E, Harr & Gillard wounded

 

 

Honora

 

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FROGSMILE
On 20/01/2018 at 13:18, Honora said:

Dear All

 

Interesting photo. I have been researching the following man :

ADDICOTT, Charles William, Private 456028, Royal Army Medical Corps, 231 Field Ambulance, died 30 October 1918, aged 29, buried Tournai Communal Cemetery Allied Section, Plot V, Row G, Grave 8.

His service record and the war diary are  on Ancestry.

Heather - might your friend let me use this photo as illustration is my text - which will be part of a local history talk and presentation in November? (ie not for commercial publication)

 

These are some extracts from my research - please, anyone, if I have made any errors - let me know.

 

He was working as a gardener for Mr William Brookes, Weston-super-Mare, and living in Alma Street, when he attested in the town for the 2nd South Western Mounted Brigade, Field Ambulance on 3 Nov 1913. Private Addicott, 1789 was 24 years and 8 months; slim built and 5 ft 7 ½ in in height.

The Western Daily Press reported on 7 August that the RAMC, 2nd South Western Mounted Brigade Field Ambulance had returned to their Frome Headquarters from Camp at the beginning of the week for the purpose of mobilisation. The men from Bath and Weston-super-Mare were billeted at various inns in the town. The same report added the military authorities were buying up all the available horses in the district and the ladies of the Red Cross Detachments were working busily.  

 After mobilisation, Charles and his unit spent the next year at Colchester, Essex - Wivenhoe is about three miles outside Colchester 

 The 1st /2ndSouth Western Mounted Brigade, composed of three yeomanry units, a signals troop and the field ambulance embarked at Liverpool for Gallipoli on 23 September 1915, arriving at their destination on 3 October, according to the Bath Chronicle (16 Oct 1915), who left it to their readers  to work out the destination

In early 1916 the Brigade was withdrawn to Egypt, where it served as part of the Suez Canal defences.

In January 1917 organisational changes were made throughout the Territorial units.  The men were given new six figure regimental numbers. Field Ambulances of the Welsh Border and South West Mounted Brigades became the 231st Field Ambulance, 74th Division; and moved to Palestine.

There was a great need for more men on the Western Front in the spring of 1918.  The 74th Division was relieved in March 1918.  Moving to Alexandria via Kantara, the Division set sail on HMT Canberra, under escort. They landed at Marseilles on 7 May 1918 and entrained for the north. 

The 231st Field Ambulance followed closely behind, during the final advance in Artios and Flanders. 

The War Diary recorded

30/10/18 H E shell in Cook House and Food Stores, Drs Cruddas & Marshall, Corpl Davies, L Corpl Barrow, Pts Addicott, Baker G, & White B C killed. L Corpl Howley, Pts Jones A E, Harr & Gillard wounded

 

 

Honora

 

 

Very interesting Honora, I think you have done a great job in bringing his brief, wartime story to life.

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