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Remembered Today:

3rd Battalion Coldstream Guards


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Hello,

I am trying to find out where the 3rd Batt,CSG were in October 1914. I am related to Pte. Fred Jamieson, 3rd Batt. who died in Wimereaux on October 31st 1914. On his medal card it says he was attached to a Light Railway Company? It's all a bit confusing so any help would be greatly appreciated.  Thanks!

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I have a roll for the 3rd Btn that lists which company they served in - will get back to you

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Cant see him on there

As he died his papers wont be at the national archives or FMP etc - for some reason guards are not there

Ill dig a bit more

 

 

The btn was not at Wimereaux then so without checking where it could be died of wounds in hospital or was indeed attached elsewhere

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From Army Registers of Soldiers' Effects, 1901-1929:

 

Name:    Frederick Jamieson
Gender:    Male
Birth Place:    Darlington
Death Date:    31 Oct 1914
Death Place:    No 4 Gen Hos Boulogne
Rank:    Private
Regiment:    Coldstream Guards
Regimental Number:    2308

 

and

 

Name:    Frederick Jamieson
Birth Date:    abt 1881
Death Date:    31 Oct 1914
Burial Place:    Darlington, Durham, England
Age:    33
Cemetery Name:    West Cemetery
Inscription:    In loving memory of/ our dear mother/ HANNAH JAMIESON/ died 31st July 1926/ aged 78 years./ Also of RICHARD/ husband of the above/ died 16th Feb 1926/ aged 77 years./ Also our dear brother FREDERICK/ son of the above died of wounds in France/ 31st Oct 1914/ aged 33 years./ STILL TO MEMORY DEAR.

 

http://www.1914-1918.net/hospitals.htm  says this: 

 

No 4 British Red Cross    Wimereux Nov 14 - Dec 15    Known as Sir Henry Norman's Hospital
No 4 General    St Nazaire Sep 14; Versailles Sep 14 - Jan 16; Camiers Jan 16 - Apr 19; Dunkerque Apr 19 - Nov 19

 

Edited by Chris_B
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  • 3 years later...

Hi @Coldstreamerare you able to tell me what company my great grandfather served in please? Thomas Henry Moore, CG 13540.

 

I’ve sent off to the archives for his information, does you previous commment mean that I won’t be able to get them? (You said the guards are not listed there?). 
 

Thank you. 

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Hi,

 

Cant help re his Company but can tell you that the CG service records have been transferred to care of MOD Glasgow. It will cost £30 to get the copy papers. There may be a small amount of information on Findmypast site.

 

Steve

 

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/request-records-of-deceased-service-personnel

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Ahh, that’s where I sent them too - Glasgow, £30. It was just before Christmas so haven’t heard anything yet. That’s good news then. Thank you. 

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My coy details for 3rd btn are only for 1914 serving abroad  men sorry.  His number suggests he went to France later

And yes, I dont have access anymore

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I'll check my records and give you a likely enlistment date

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enlisted likely 7-9th September 1914

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  • 3 years later...

'Guest' probably isn't trawling anymore but for the sake of posterity.....

2308 Pte Fred Jamieson, 3rd Coldstream Guards, WIA 28 October 1914 at Reutel, DOW 31 October at 14 General Hospital, Boulogne.

The 3/CG war diary:

October 27. At 11.30 a.m. Major Mathieson decided to move the battalion still further back a few hundred yards, as the enemy's artillery was searching the open ground where we lay.

At 4.30 p.m. we were ordered to relieve the Irish Guards in the trenches.

The relief was carried out without incident at dusk. The trenches were in the most extraordinary position imaginable, facing in all direction, enfilading and being enfiladed, and in one case even fired at in rear!

October 28. The men in the trenches had an uncomfortable day owing to snipers, but they were not shelled.

We had four men killed and five wounded. Our orders were that the 5th Brigade on our left were going to advance but they never did, and as far as we could see never attempted or intended to.

2/Lt Synge, 3/CG diary:

27 October, Tuesday.

The morning passed without incident and I am thankful to say a company of the Grenadiers relieved us soon after 3. We then retired to the wood to wait for the darkness, After dark we advanced to the far edge of a wood due W. of Becelaere and relieved the Irish Guards in trenches which in the dark seemed a regular rabbit-warren. Just as we had settled down to dinner about 7.30 the enemy started up a heavy rifle fire which, however, soon subsided.

28 October, Wednesday.

The enemy again open fire at daybreak but did not make an attack. With daylight we were able to see our position. To start with we had three platoons in the fire trench and one in the reserve trench. Later we had all four in the fire trench. We held the edge of a wood with two platoons, one facing the front – that is east, the other facing south. On the right of the latter was No.3 Company while on the left of the former one platoon was entrenched in a clearing. On their left was No.1 Company. Thus we had No.8 on the left, No.6 in the centre and No.5 on the right; No.7 was in the reserve trench which was connected with the fire Trench by to communication trenches. Later on No.7 took the place of No.5 which moved into the wood beyond No.8. The German trenches were about 400 to 500 yards distant on both our fronts. The soil was very sandy and crumbly so that the men could not burrow under very much. Another trouble was that the sand was continually getting into our hair and down our necks. We pulled down a haystack, so there was no lack of straw.

The snipers were very troublesome and we could not locate them. 

At night fall we made a rough barbed wire entanglement among the trees in front of No.6 platoon who had a very bad field of fire. About 11 o'clock the enemy opened fire but nothing came of it.

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Coincidentally this bed plate is for sale on popular online site... 

image.jpeg.ef8142edfdb9ee1fc8ef2020d071dd4b.jpeg

L/Cpl Lovegrove, WIA the same day as 3/CG comrade Fred Jamieson, related his experiences from hospital [Uxbridge & W. Drayton Gazette - Friday 18 December 1914]:

'...A French regiment ultimately relieved us, and we were enabled to get a few hour’s much needed rest, but it did not last long. We were soon called out again to reinforce another part of the line. Whilst waiting to go into action, a chaplain came along to where we were lying, and although the shells were flying and exploding around, he took up a position where we could all see and hear him, and held a short service, giving an address just as calmly as if he were at home preaching a sermon. And we had a hymn, and all of us joined in, and those of us who are alive to think of it will never forget it; I shall not. After the service we were ordered to relieve the Irish Guards, who were stationed in a wood, or what had once been a wood. All the tops of the trees had been shot away, or blown off by shell fire. There were hundreds of dead Germans lying about. We had a stiff job here, but finally succeeded in dislodging the enemy and occupying their trenches, which were in a shocking state – indescribably filthy, and smelling horribly. It was whilst I and our Sergeant were watching a German officer, who was trying to take up a position for sniping in a hedge not far off, that I received my wound. My attention being riveted on the German, I failed to take any account of a shell which came straight into our trench, and hit me and eight others. We were two hours in the trench in a wounded condition before we could be moved. Lieutenant Horlick (related to the Slough family I think) was our officer. He did all he could to make us comfortable, gave us chocolate and fags; later we were removed and taken to hospital; and subsequently I was allowed home on sick leave.'

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