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MaxD

1914 Star - wearing of the ribbon

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MaxD

What was the earliest date that the ribbon of the 1914 Star could be worn by those so qualified?

 

 

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tullybrone

Hi,

 

Copy & Paste from a previous topic - post by forum member Nigel S

 

"The Times of 26/11/17 (below) - 

 

1914 Star In Bronze.

The New Decoration For Early Service.

An Army Order issued on Saturday announces that the King has been pleased to signify his pleasure to recognise, by the grant of a distinctive decoration, the services rendered by his Majesty's Military Forces under the command of Field Marshall Sir J.D.P. French G.C.B., G.C.V.O., K.C.M.G, in France and Belgium during the earlier phase of the war in 1914, up to midnight November 22-23, 1914.

The decoration will be a Star in bronze. No clasp will be issued with the star. The ribbon will be red, white, and blue, shaded and watered.

Provided the claims are approved by the Army Council, the Star will be granted to all officers, warrant officer, non-commissioned officers, and men of the British and Indian forces, including civilian medical practitioners, nursing sisters, nurses, and others employed with military hospitals, who actually served in France or Belgium, on the establishment of a unit of the British Expeditionary Forces, between August 5, 1914, and midnight of November 22-23, 1914.

Officers i/c records will prepare (on printed forms to be obtained from the Secretary, War Office (A.G. 10) nominal rolls, in duplicate, of soldiers entitled to the Star, and forward them, as soon as practicable, to Secretary, War Office (A.G. 10).

Officers (including chaplains and acting chaplains) and nursing staffs (excluding the rank and file of the Royal Army Medical Corps), if not now serving, through their present commanding officers or heads of departments, stating their rank and situation on original date of disembarkation, which must be specified.

In the case of deceased officers and other ranks, applications from their legatee or next-of-kin should, in the former case, be addressed to Secretary, War Office (A.G. 10) and, in the latter case, to the officer i/c records concerned.

The names of officers and warrant officers will be entered on the rolls in order of rank, and those of non-commissioned officers and men in alphabetical order. The rank and regimental number entered on the rolls will be that held by an individual on the date of disembarkation.

The names of individuals who have forfeited the Star under the conditions laid down in the Pay Warrant are to be included in the rolls, their names being entered in red ink and the cause of forfeiture stated in the column for “remarks.” The names of those that have become non-effective by death, transfer, discharge, &c., should also be entered in red ink and the cause of stated in the column for “remarks.”

 

* *The decision to grant a distinctive decoration to those who served in France and Belgium in the early part of the war was announced in The Times of September 10."

 

 

Presumably ribbon would be available for issue by early 1918?

 

Steve Y

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horatio2

Admiralty Fleet Order 331/1918 (31 Jan 1918) promulgated the fact that the riband was ready for issue on application.

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NigelS

Similarly, The Times of December 24th 1917 gives:

The issue and wearing of the Riband of the “1914 Star” form the subject of a new Army Council Instruction. It is notified that preliminary issue of 4in of riband has been sanctioned for each individual now serving who is entitled to the decoration. The “1914 Star” is to be considered a war medal, and must be worn as such. The Riband will be worn with the red edge on the right – i.e., with the red edge furthest from the left shoulder

 

In the January 24th, 1918 edition it was reported that:

It has been brought to the notice of the Secretary of State for War that some misapprehension exists as to eligibility to receive  the 1914 Star. He has accordingly instructed the Secretary, War Office, to announce that all officers and men, whether still serving or not, who have fulfilled the conditions laid down, will receive the decoration.

Owing to difficulties of manufacture, the medals will not be ready for issue for some little time, and the distribution of the ribbon can only be made gradually. In regard to the latter, men now in the field are being supplied first, but it is hoped that those at home will be reached  shortly.

 

Certainly by May 27th of the same year it appears that the ribands were probably  freely available - perhaps a bit too freely!

An Army Order states that it has been brought to notice that certain individuals who are not entitled to the award of the 1914 star are wearing the ribbon of this decoration. The wearing of the ribbon by officers and soldiers is governed by paragraph 1,738, King's regulations ( which deals with the wearing of the ribbon pending the issue of the medal). General Officers Commanding will take the necessary steps to ensure that the ribbon is worn only by those entitled to the Star...

with warnings given about it being an offence under the Defence of the Realm Regulation 41(a) for an authorized person to wear one.

 

NigelS

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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MaxD

Very useful facts and background, thank you everyone.  I had turned up the  24 Dec 1917 just after posting the query but the follow up reports are fascinating!

 

Max

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thetrenchrat22

The Oak Tree, of June 1918.  The regimental magazine of the Cheshire Regiment has a photo of 43 Officers & Men.  The caption reads 'A group taken last September of Officers and Men of the 1st Battalion, who were that still serving with it, and who wear the Mons Star.'

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MaxD

Good for them!

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Keith_history_buff

An interesting post from another thread, in relation to this question. Medal rolls that I have seen are dated February and March 1918.

  

On 21/05/2013 at 01:23, Ian Riley said:

From The Liverpool Scottish 1900-1918 (verified from the War Diary)

On 29 January 1918 the Brigade [166th Infantry Brigade] was inspected by the Corps Commander [snow, I think] and afterwards Brigadier General Kentish pinned the newly issued 1914 ribbon on the breasts of all those entitled to wear it. As the Scottish were the first battalion in the Brigade to go to France they, of course, predominated on this parade and numbered sixty five out of a total of about eighty. Not the least proud memory of a proud day for the nineteenfourteeners was the "eyes right" they received from the whole Brigade as it marched past them after the ceremony.


Taken from the following thread

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RNCVR

This may not assist with the 1914 star, but it may with the 1914-15 star.  I will attach a photo of a group of sailors from HMS Emperor of India taken in Malta approx 1920.  In that photo several of the ratings are wearing their 1914-15 stars & possibly ribbons for the British War & Victory medals - which had not yet been issued.

 

I am estimating 1920 for two reasons - the cap badge for CPO's(Chief Petty Officers) changed in 1920. The CPO in the centre of the photo (to the Officer's left)appears to be still wearing the old cap badge, as is worn by the PO (Petty Officer) seated centre of the 1st row.  However I could be mistaken here as the CPO's cap badge is not that clear, it could well be the post 1920 cap badge.  

2nd reason is the same CPO is not wearing the three gilt cuff buttons of his rank, also in 1920 all CPO's were entitled to wear the three cuff buttons denoting their rank.

Some the the ratings appear to be wearing only the BWM ribbon & other appear to be wearing the War & Victory ribbons - I will att'd a few closeups.  The Officer in centre appears to be wearing ribbons for the trio but again this is hard to determine with any degree of certainty due to the folds in his tunic in that area.  The CPO in centre is wearing what I think is a QSA(Queen South Africa), a 1914-15 star & RN Long Service medal.  Its difficult to determine exactly what ribbons the various sailors are wearing due to being partially obscured by their silks, but the visible ribbons appear to be the War medal & possibly the Victory medal ribbons.

 

May or may not assist but posted for interest if nothing else.................

 

Thanks, Bryan

 

1914-15stars 001.JPG

Edited by RNCVR

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RNCVR

Closeups ----  All of the ratings are members of the Torpedo branch (the rate badges on their right sleeves), expect their Torpedo Officer is being married in Malta.

 

Thanks, Bryan

1914-15stars 011.JPG

1914-15stars 004.JPG

1914-15stars 003.JPG

1914-15stars 005.JPG

1914-15stars 006.JPG

1914-15stars 008.JPG

1914-15stars 002.JPG

1914-15stars 007.JPG

Edited by RNCVR

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themonsstar

Great photos lads

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