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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

Model Plane WW1 Number 9143


sdjknox

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Hello All,

According to my mother I was very good with my toys, but I was given a model plane in perfect condition which I think I decided to see if it would fly. Unfortunately the smashed plane is the result in the attached photograph. I have googled the number 9143  but no result. I wondered if someone could let me know what they think the plane was (Sopwith something?) and is that number of any significance please. I have a feeling that it was made in the 1930s and passed down my family until I ruined it in the 1970's.

I know this isn't a very serious topic for the forum but I have a genuine interest in knowing whether it has any historical significance in its design or individuality.

Thanks

Steve

I don't think the photo is attached as it is too large I shall try and reduce it and attach, please bear with me. 

 

Edited by sdjknox
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Hopefully the photos are visible enough to help identification. 40 minutes of my life trying to work out how to do this.....

DSCF7637 - Copy.JPG

DSCF7641.JPG

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I know little of such things but the construction looks fairly crude so it's logical to assume that it's homemade and maybe a copy of one the builder flew (or someone in his family etc). B4173 was a Camel flown by a Captain Maddocks - I know the B is missing on the model but that could well be a memory thing by the builder..

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Phil,

Thanks for your interest and reply, I am now feeling even more guilty as I have a post about a relative Thomas Arthur Hough who was an observer in the RFC. I am hoping he did not make this model. Captain Maddocks is a mystery to me and I have just searched the forum and drawn a blank. Was he a famous aviator of WW1?

Regards,

Steve

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9143 was actually a Farman F.27.  The only Sopwith with 9143 in its serial was Camel B9143; it was allotted to the Expeditionary Force on 31 October 1917 and was delivered to No 54 Squadron.  It was flown by Capt H H Maddocks who claimed a DFW C in flames on 3 January 1918 and by 2nd Lt C S Bowen, who stalled on take-off for shooting at a ground target and crashed into Camels B9257 and B9285 on 6 March; not worth repair, it was Struck Off Charge at 2 ASD on 14 March.  

 

Henry Hollingdrake Maddocks was a successful pilot, claiming seven victories between 12 August 1917 and 3 February 1918.  He was awarded the Military Cross, Gazetted on 17 December 1917, the citation reading:

2nd Lt. Henry Hollingrake Maddocks, Gen. List, and R.F.C.

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty.  Whilst attacking two hostile aeroplanes he saw an enemy machine attacking one of his patrol.  He at once attacked the enemy machine, which was seen to crash.  On one occasion during a fight between seven enemy machines and a patrol of our scouts, he engaged one of the enemy machines causing it to drop from 6,000 feet to 1,000 feet, where it caught fire and dived vertically down.  On two other occasions he drove down an enemy machine after a short fight.  He has done consistent and continual good work.

Graeme

 

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The overall shape is a bit reminiscent of a Bristol Scout.

 

Chris

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Graeme and Chris,

Thanks very much for your interest, but also Graeme for providing such an interesting reply beyond my expectations from a post about a damaged toy. I have not heard of a Farman F.27 before and will investigate that tomorrow. I have heard of a Bristol Scout but having looked back at my post regarding Thomas Arthur Hough feel he had no connection with the famous Maddocks airplane as his service was in 1918 after the RAF was formed.

Regards,

Steve

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The shape of the wings and tailplane, as well as the holes for the struts, would suggest the model was based on a Bristol Scout, though none of the serial number ranges (A, B, C, etc) as a prefix for 9143 were for this type.

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Phil and Starlight,

Thanks for your replies. Phil in his previous communication opined the model was "crude" and it is compared with his link to the model Sopwith Camel. I do however go with Starlight's and ChrisB's earlier post that it is a Bristol Scout with a made up number as it looks nothing like a Farman F.27. From my broken toy, which I might have a go at mending over the winter, I have learnt a surprising amount from forum pals for which I am grateful.

Steve 

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At the end of the day, no-one is ever really going to know the truth behind it and all is supposition. Yes, it's quite possible that the number could be imaginary but, to me, the general shape and the colouring suggest a handmade model of an actual Camel that someone may well have built 10 or 20 years after the fact. The simple facts are that it could have been built totally from someone's imagination as a toy for a child or it could be the recreation of a memory and, on that basis alone it would be a shame not to preserve it.

 

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Phil,

Thanks for your comments, I will have to have a go at putting it back together. The propeller could be a challenge! I know how they make real ones shaping timber in a plywood format but at this scale that looks impossible.

Regards,

Steve 

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50 minutes ago, sdjknox said:

Phil,

Thanks for your comments, I will have to have a go at putting it back together. The propeller could be a challenge! I know how they make real ones shaping timber in a plywood format but at this scale that looks impossible.

Regards,

Steve 

Hi

The tail fin, wing tip shape and cockpit position make it rather Bristol Scout...ish rather than Camel...ish.

 

Mike

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Mike,

Thanks for your comments, by the time I have had a go at mending it I suspect it will be unique and neither Scout..ish or Camel...ish!

Steve

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