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Lawryleslie

Maltese Military Hospitals during Gallipoli Campaign

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Lawryleslie

My Grandfather was seriously wounded on 6th June during the Turkish counter attack following the 3rd Battle of Krithia. I have traced his return to UK via RND field Ambulance Station, Casualty Clearing Station, HMHS Soudan and back to RNH Chatham. He spent a few days in hospital in Malta but I have tried, without success, trace which hospital this was. RNH Bighi was the main military hospital at the time but many temporary hospitals were formed to deal with the casualties coming from Gallipoli. Does anybody know if records were kept of casualties passing through Maltese military hospitals?

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Maureene

There is a previous GWT called Hospitals in Malta

 

The only medical records I am aware of are those at The National Archives called War Office: First World War Representative Medical Records of Servicemen MH 106. http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/C10949. They are from " from various theatres of war". As described, these are only a sample of records, the rest were destroyed. Some (perhaps all?) of the MH 106 records are on Forces War Records, a pay website, as the database "Military Hospitals Admissions and Discharge Registers WW1 Collection"

Cheers

Maureen

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petestarling

I have lectured on the medical aspects of Malta during the First World War and you are right, there were many hospitals and convalescent camps all over Malta and Gozo. The island was named the Nurse of the Mediterranean . As you look into the hospitals more closely you are able to find out which ones treated diseases and which wounds and in the case of the latter what type of wounds. The Official History of the First World War, Medical Services, Campaigns Vol 1 has a chapter on Malta and there are also several other works on the subject. Do you know what his wound was?

Pete

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Lawryleslie
On 12 June 2016 at 16:12, petestarling said:

I have lectured on the medical aspects of Malta during the First World War and you are right, there were many hospitals and convalescent camps all over Malta and Gozo. The island was named the Nurse of the Mediterranean . As you look into the hospitals more closely you are able to find out which ones treated diseases and which wounds and in the case of the latter what type of wounds. The Official History of the First World War, Medical Services, Campaigns Vol 1 has a chapter on Malta and there are also several other works on the subject. Do you know what his wound was?

Pete

Thanks for this Pete. The only information I have from his service records regarding his wounds are " AFB 103  received 4/6/15 Hosp. Dardenelles. Sick. 6.6.15. Wounded Dardenelles. BW Back. 21.6.15. Embarked for England per H.S. Soudan. Invalided." 

Plus " Rep. Recd.adm to Malta Hos. 11/6/15. Contused  back. Sev.Some improvement. Dardanelles 4/6/15. NOK not informed."

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petestarling
It really depends on how back his wound was. There were several hospitals dealing with minor wounded. Cottonera was the main surgical hospital but the Auberge de Baviere was for severe surgical cases mainly head and spinal. There is always the chance that because he had a wound to his back they sent him there.

 

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Lawryleslie
1 hour ago, petestarling said:

It really depends on how back his wound was. There were several hospitals dealing with minor wounded. Cottonera was the main surgical hospital but the Auberge de Baviere was for severe surgical cases mainly head and spinal. There is always the chance that because he had a wound to his back they sent him there.

 

 

1 hour ago, petestarling said:

It really depends on how back his wound was. There were several hospitals dealing with minor wounded. Cottonera was the main surgical hospital but the Auberge de Baviere was for severe surgical cases mainly head and spinal. There is always the chance that because he had a wound to his back they sent him there.

 

Thanks for this information Pete. His wound was severe enough for him to be "Discharged Unserviceable" on 24/11/15. Although he made a recovery to enable him to become a Police Officer for many years. He carried the bullet in his back for the rest of his life and often showed us, his grand kids, the wound site in his back. Are there any admission records held off these hospitals you mention?

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Lawryleslie
1 hour ago, petestarling said:

It really depends on how back his wound was. There were several hospitals dealing with minor wounded. Cottonera was the main surgical hospital but the Auberge de Baviere was for severe surgical cases mainly head and spinal. There is always the chance that because he had a wound to his back they sent him there.

 

Have just researched a bit about Auberge De Baviere hospital and it didn't open until 15/6/15, some four days after Grandads arrival in Malta. Is it possible he could have been transferred there because he remained in Maltese hospital until 21/6/15?

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michaeldr

The information given in the late Patrick Gariepy's article on Gallipoli Campaign Hospitals in The Gallipolian, Spring 2006, suggests that this hospital was reserved for severe surgical cases.

My own grandfather was also evacuated to Malta with a wound suffered at IIIrd Krithia and it is my understanding that at this stage of the war, as the RND was still operating under the Admiralty, then their wounded would therefore have been referred to one of the RN hospitals, rather than to one catering for the Army under the War Office. I feel that Bighi remains the favourite here

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Lawryleslie
20 hours ago, michaeldr said:

The information given in the late Patrick Gariepy's article on Gallipoli Campaign Hospitals in The Gallipolian, Spring 2006, suggests that this hospital was reserved for severe surgical cases.

My own grandfather was also evacuated to Malta with a wound suffered at IIIrd Krithia and it is my understanding that at this stage of the war, as the RND was still operating under the Admiralty, then their wounded would therefore have been referred to one of the RN hospitals, rather than to one catering for the Army under the War Office. I feel that Bighi remains the favourite here

Thank you Michael. This has always been my belief but the lack of surviving records made by Maltese hospitals makes it a bit of a needle in a haystack. Even those held at TNA are only sample records and you'd have to be damned lucky to find anything. 

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michaeldr

In the case of my grandfather his records specifically state "admitted to R.N. Hosp. Malta", both on his record cards and on his Record of Medical History in the R N Division.

Do you have your grandfather's full records from the FAAM?

If not, then getting them may help with more detailed info than is available elsewhere

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Lawryleslie
On 19 June 2016 at 13:22, michaeldr said:

In the case of my grandfather his records specifically state "admitted to R.N. Hosp. Malta", both on his record cards and on his Record of Medical History in the R N Division.

Do you have your grandfather's full records from the FAAM?

If not, then getting them may help with more detailed info than is available elsewhere

Thanks Michael. I have now received all his RNVR/RND available records including Army Form B103 from FAAM for the modest cost of 20 quid, very reasonable indeed. It gives his casualty number on admission to RNH Malta. I'm now taking it that this refers to RNH Bighi. I'm off to Malta next year armed with this information so may get further with research.

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momsirish

Hello Petestarling:  In post #3 you indicated that Malta Hospitals were set up to handle specific type wounds and I guess based on severity of the wounds.

My relative Patrick Delaney 9364 (not quite sure # is correct as I'm not near my records) was according to a newspaper article reported to be in  the  Lancashire Military Convalescent Home recouping from an arm amputation in  October 1915.  He was in the 1 Royal Dublin Fusiliers landing at Helles 25/4/1915. so the wound was probably gotten in August 1915.  If this is true would you possibly know which hospital he might  have been sent to if in Malta or Alexandria?  I believe he was a private at that time and later became a CSM.   It seems all his service records were destroyed.  He later died of wounds received at Gheluvelt Belgium in 1918.

Thanks in advance for any possible information or lead you can give.  The story is he had asked to remain with his RDF unit.

Momsirish 

 

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Lawryleslie
4 hours ago, momsirish said:

Hello Petestarling:  In post #3 you indicated that Malta Hospitals were set up to handle specific type wounds and I guess based on severity of the wounds.

My relative Patrick Delaney 9364 (not quite sure # is correct as I'm not near my records) was according to a newspaper article reported to be in  the  Lancashire Military Convalescent Home recouping from an arm amputation in  October 1915.  He was in the 1 Royal Dublin Fusiliers landing at Helles 25/4/1915. so the wound was probably gotten in August 1915.  If this is true would you possibly know which hospital he might  have been sent to if in Malta or Alexandria?  I believe he was a private at that time and later became a CSM.   It seems all his service records were destroyed.  He later died of wounds received at Gheluvelt Belgium in 1918.

Thanks in advance for any possible information or lead you can give.  The story is he had asked to remain with his RDF unit.

Momsirish 

 

Hello 

I've just had a quick look on Ancestry.com and two Patrick Delaney's appear from Royal Dublin Fusiliers and some service records are available although a bit smoke damaged. If you can confirm his service number and approximate birth year then I may be able to pin point him and find some information on him.

regards 

Greg

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michaeldr
12 hours ago, momsirish said:

Hello Petestarling:  In post #3 you indicated that Malta Hospitals were set up to handle specific type wounds and I guess based on severity of the wounds.

My relative Patrick Delaney 9364 (not quite sure # is correct as I'm not near my records) was according to a newspaper article reported to be in  the  Lancashire Military Convalescent Home recouping from an arm amputation in  October 1915.  He was in the 1 Royal Dublin Fusiliers landing at Helles 25/4/1915. so the wound was probably gotten in August 1915.  If this is true would you possibly know which hospital he might  have been sent to if in Malta or Alexandria?  I believe he was a private at that time and later became a CSM.   It seems all his service records were destroyed.  He later died of wounds received at Gheluvelt Belgium in 1918.

Thanks in advance for any possible information or lead you can give.  The story is he had asked to remain with his RDF unit.

Momsirish 

 

 

8 hours ago, Lawryleslie said:

Hello 

I've just had a quick look on Ancestry.com and two Patrick Delaney's appear from Royal Dublin Fusiliers and some service records are available although a bit smoke damaged. If you can confirm his service number and approximate birth year then I may be able to pin point him and find some information on him.

regards 

Greg

 

The number quoted (9364) is the same as given in Patrick Hogarty's book Remembrance - A Brief History of 'The Blue Caps' The 1st Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers 1914-1922

Incidentally, while the CWGC acknowledges his DCM they do not list the MM ascribed to him in PH's book - which is correct? 

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Lawryleslie
21 minutes ago, michaeldr said:

 

 

The number quoted (9364) is the same as given in Patrick Hogarty's book Remembrance - A Brief History of 'The Blue Caps' The 1st Battalion Royal Dublin Fusiliers 1914-1922

Incidentally, while the CWGC acknowledges his DCM they do not list the MM ascribed to him in PH's book - which is correct? 

Sorry his service number you quote doesn't match any of the soldiers I found this morning. The anomally with his MM could be that in the absence of lost official records the information in PH's book is anecdotal whereas CWGC would only quote from official sources which they may have obtained for DCM. That's the only explanation I can suggest. You may want to pitch this question into the "medals" section of the forum where there is a plethora of expertise.

Good luck with your research.

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momsirish

Michaeldr and Lawryleslie;  You guys are really great!:rolleyes:.  Yes Patrick 9364 is my uncle and we have copies of Pat Hogarty's book and Sean Connolly's book Forelorne,  and Oak's book as well.  My distant relatives it turned out have his and his brother Christie's medals, except for Christie's Mons Star.  I have his (Patrick) medal cards for the MM and the DCM.   Last May I sent out a Remembrance packet for Christie to the family, using a photocopy of his deadman's penny as a cover page.  I hope to do the same for Patrick, but just thought I might find something about his hospital stay before the 28 of this month. I'd like to get the packet out with the Post Mark on the 28th or a day or two before that day.   If not I will get it done for next year.

Again thanks guys.

Momsirish

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momsirish

Michaeldr and Lawryleslie: RE: Patrick & Christie Delaney:   Another relative had looked into Ancestry several years ago and found nothing.   I tried about two or three years ago with a free trial and found nothing, but two Christies, whose records were burnt to the point of being useless. 

Greg, Patrick was born in 1887, D.O.W 28/9/1918, and he is the same guy Pat Hogarty mentions. 

Christie Delaney 4721, 1Royal Irish Regiment was K.I.A. just outside of Hooge 15/5/1915,  CWGC has his age as ten years older than he was.   I have his birth records but have not gotten around to requesting an age correction.  His Mons Star may be on his 4th R.I.Regiment medal cards which as far as I know their ( 4th Royal Irish Regiment's) info have not been digitized yet?    Christie's grave and body were not recovered.  He had been buried near the trenches the day he was killed..

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petestarling

Monsirish

On Malta Cottonera was the main surgical hospital but Floriana Barracks was opened in May 15 and was used for treating severely wounded, so he could have gone to either.

 

Pete

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momsirish

Pete:  Thanks for that it gives me a place to start.    I was just guessing that it might take several months for an amputation to heal enough to be able to get back into the fight,   That is why I presumed the wound have to be received in August,1915.    And the term Arm amputation does not indicate if all or just what part of the arm was removed..  I believe that by mid 1916 some 6,000 or more prosthetics from hands and toes to feet and fingers and arms and legs were distributed to casualties and veterans.  I guess this war instigated the first large scale, with advanced training, efforts of rehabilitating amputees back into society since the end of the American Civil War. 

Momsirish

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Terry_Reeves

Here is a list of hospitals and convalescent depots from Malta during the First World War 1194-1918 by Anthony Zarb-Dimech. Those marked + are Convalescent Depots and ++ indicates Convalescent homes.

 

Cottonera

Imtarfa

Forrrest

Valletta

Tigne

St Georges

St Andrew's

Dragonara++

Blue Sisters

Floriana+

Hamrun

All Saints (Staff to Salonica 11.17)

Baviere

St Ignatius

Sisters" Floriana

St Davids+

St Elmo

St Patrick's +

Ghajn Tuffieha  (Staff to Salonica 1/19)

St Paul's +

St Jonn's

Fort Chambray (Staff to Salonica 13.3.16)

Manoel

Spinola +

Ricasoli

Mellieha (Staff to Salonica 9.17)

Verdala ++

San Antonio ++

 

TR

 

 

 

 

Edited by Terry_Reeves

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seaJane

And RNH Bighi.

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momsirish

I checked with Malta RAMC, and the responder was exceptionally helpful in that he was willing to check their files.  However he only had Imperial Australian Forces ( soldiers) listed as treated there.   Those records seem to be complete with many details for the soldiers.  This is good for any forum pal searching for Australian or New Zealand (I think) soldiers who fought in Gallipoli.   I've been told there are files for my man at the IWM, hopefully I'll know in a couple of days what hospital he went to.   

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momsirish

I donated the request for IWM that same day 9/20/2016, but have not been able to register/ subscribe to livesofthefirstworlkdwar.  Nor have I been able to get a response from "lives..."  as to why their website pages does not let one sign -up.   Their monthly subscription icon is grayed out every time I try it.

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Lawryleslie
3 hours ago, ivor evans said:

there is this one..https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RNH_.

 

 

ivor

 

thanks Ivor. I believe that Mtarfa was used for ANZAC casualties certainly in the early part of the Gallipoli campaign. My Grandfather was UK forces (Collingwood Battalion RND).

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