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Dannemois

Cleaning Medals

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QSAMIKE

Personally, I tend shy away from broken groups, the one exception being a 15 Star (LIEUT. E. P. YEATES, 1/12/PIONEERS.) and BWM (Capt.), which, however, came with a small convolute of documents. It transpired that Yeates had served under (the later notorious) Brig.-Gen. Dyer, in Sistan, Persia, 1915-16. He is briefly mentioned in the book written by Dyer, of the campaign. Yeates also wrote his own account, published in The History of the Bombay Pioneers.

The Kim.

Kimberley John Lindsay.

Personally, I dislike loose ends, which is why the medals sans Victory to Major E. P. Yeates are the exception - but it takes all kinds...

Kindest regards,

Kim.

Kimberley John Lindsay.

O.M.G Kim.......

You had me going there for a while as I have a broken group to Lieut./Capt./Major E.P. Yeates (Missing Victory Medal) but I am afraid that they are not the same man...... Damn......

Mike

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Kimberley John Lindsay

Dear Mike (or should I say: O. M. G. Mike?),

How odd for there to have been two Lieut/Capt/Major E. P. Yeates: and even odder that both were subsequently missing Victory Medals!

Born 7 Nov 1888 in Cookstown, County Tyrone, Edwin Perceval Yeates was the son of a District Inspector, RIC (William Henry Yeates). Foyle College, 1901-07; RMC Sandhurst (latterly 17th in order of merit, commissioned 9 Sep 1908); 2Lt ULIA (attd 1st Bn Royal Irish Regt) and joined 12th Pioneers (Khelat-i-Ghilzie), 30 Nov 1909, NW Frontier. Active Service East Persia 1915-16 (Capt 1 Sep 1915) and subsequently invalided, together with Brig.-Gen. Dyer, both suffering from Colitis.

After a lengthy recuperation, but his health impared, Capt Yeates was appointed Coy Cdr 2nd Bn 32nd Sikh Pioneers, on 15 Feb 1918 (campaign in Palestine). Temporary Non-Effective List 23 May to 8 Dec 1922.

Married Christine Wylie in Bombay, 10 Nov 1923 (both enjoyed tennis). Major, 9 Sep 1924, 2nd Bn Bombay Pioneers. Retd 7 Mar 1926 and enjoyed a lengthy retirement at Warminster.

Died aged 85 on 18 Nov 1973...

Kindest regards,

Kim.

Kimberley John Lindsay.

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depaor01

I'd like to bring some specifics to this thread and ask for opinions about medals with severe tarnishing. Personally I'd like to see these examples shine again. I'd like to know opinions about whether I should or not - using methods mentioned earlier in this thread:

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BWM

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post-42233-0-92432200-1462654788_thumb.j

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green_acorn

Clean with non-abrasive dips as per the Australian War Memorial guide.

Hendo

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yellow

A good magnifying glass. Can you see pitting? If yes...clean.....if no......no need.

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james_harvey

Clean, medals were designed to be worn shiny

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trenchtrotter

But you can't beat a lovely patina?

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depaor01

But you can't beat a lovely patina?

That's the reason for my post. These are blackened beyond the patina stage (I have several nicely aged examples in my collection). To clean very blackened or not?

Dave

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Trev2386

When I first started collecting, my initial thoughts were to clean any tarnished or 'dirty' medals. But that was just my way of thinking, ex forces, didn't look right, medals should be shiny. However, as time has gone on, I now leave them, I even have some that are so black I can hardly make out the detail!!

Horses for courses I suppose.

Trev

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GWF1967

When I first started collecting, my initial thoughts were to clean any tarnished or 'dirty' medals. But that was just my way of thinking, ex forces, didn't look right, medals should be shiny. However, as time has gone on, I now leave them, I even have some that are so black I can hardly make out the detail!!

Horses for courses I suppose.

Trev

I'm of the same mind. I display them as found, loved/unloved.

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trenchtrotter

That's the reason for my post. These are blackened beyond the patina stage (I have several nicely aged examples in my collection). To clean very blackened or not?

Dave

But from images these appear to have toned well.

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depaor01

But from images these appear to have toned well.

Thanks for the input. On balance I think they'll be left alone.

Dave

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BullerTurner

I was worried when you said you didn't clean your medals at first Coldstreamer! It seemed very un-Household Division like behavior!  

 

I am am intrigued by the baking powder, Fairy liquid (other detergents are available!) and hot water mix.  What quantities/proportions please museumtom?

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Geertsen

I don't know why but I love the look of blackened silver on medals. I much prefer the medals I have which have not been cleaned to the ones I have bought pre-cleaned (i have never polished one and I would only ever wash off dirt or heavy grime). I always think that tarnishing brings out the design of the medals, especially if the high spots are less blackened (through natural rubbing and contact over many years). Polished medals just seem flatter somehow. 

 

In a way I see it similar to if I bought an old / antique piece of wooden furniture, I wouldn't sand it to remove the wear and patina of time to make it look fresh. However, if there is deep corrosion it's of course best to stop the progression if it will cause increasing damage. 

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rflory

Geertsen:  You would never have made it in the army units in which I served.  Tarnish is caused by pollutants and dirt or other pollutants do not have a place on uniforms, boots, helmets, medals, insignia or any other military equipment - at least that is what the sergeant-major always said!  :lol:  Seriously, no soldier ever wore their medals in uniform with tarnish on them and I prefer medals that were "worn with pride."

 

 

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Geertsen
On 23 July 2016 at 06:25, rflory said:

Geertsen:  You would never have made it in the army units in which I served.  Tarnish is caused by pollutants and dirt or other pollutants do not have a place on uniforms, boots, helmets, medals, insignia or any other military equipment - at least that is what the sergeant-major always said!  :lol:  Seriously, no soldier ever wore their medals in uniform with tarnish on them and I prefer medals that were "worn with pride."

 

 

Ha Ha, that's a fair point rflory! I suppose that's why to clean or not to clean is such a split topic, some like them to remain untouched and see the age, others like to display them carefully cleaned 'as worn'. I can see the appeal either way to a certain extent!

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rflory

Geertsen:  You are correct it is certainly a 'split topic'; as a generalization I find that most collectors of Victorian medals like them with patina while those who collect British medals for the Great War and later tend to like them clean, although even that is not completely true.

 

Dick Flory

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