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Need Assessment of Recently Acquired Brodie Helmet


gordon92
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I recently acquired a Brodie helmet pictured below from a dealer that I consider trustworthy. Took a chance because it was reasonably priced even though I know next to nothing about Brodie helmets. The helmet was represented as a WW1 private purchase officer's helmet, and has a webbing chin strap with sanded paint finish as can be seen in the photos.

The only markings inside are this inscription on the lower part of the crown near the inside of the brim:

P 7

2

Could I get an assessment from our forum helmet experts? Is there any reason to believe this is other than a WW1 vintage officer's private purchase Brodie helmet? Could anyone provide an interpretation of the above inscription?

Thanks in anticipation.

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I'll stick my neck out and say you have a nice Brodie shell and what looks like an authentic liner. From the state of the liner, I would suspect the original leather chin strap has become so damaged that it has been replaced at some point, but who knows when? Is there any evidence of a leather chin strap under the liner rivet? The webbing chin strap does not appear to have anything like the wear of the liner and I don't believe it will be a circa WW1 chinstrap - possibly later and American? The bales are certainly a new type on me, but the rivets look to be 'period'.

David

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I'll stick my neck out and say you have a nice Brodie shell and what looks like an authentic liner. From the state of the liner, I would suspect the original leather chin strap has become so damaged that it has been replaced at some point, but who knows when? Is there any evidence of a leather chin strap under the liner rivet? The webbing chin strap does not appear to have anything like the wear of the liner and I don't believe it will be a circa WW1 chinstrap - possibly later and American? The bales are certainly a new type on me, but the rivets look to be 'period'.

David

David - Thanks for your thoughts. There is no evidence of a leather chin strap under the liner rivet.

It's a US civilian helmet. Some were used by Civil Defense organizations during WWII. It is most assuredly not a WWI private-purchase helmet

aef1917 - Appreciate your assessment. This is unwelcome news; nevertheless, that is why I asked. Could you elaborate on the features that point toward a US civilian helmet?

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I don't know anything about WW2 US helmets (though I don't doubt AEF's assessment), but I do know that no officer would be seen dead in this absolute dog of a helmet. The whole point of officers having helmets relined was to produce a superior piece of headgear, not something uglier than and considerably inferior to the original product. Any dealer with a modicum of experience and commonsense should know this. I'd send it straight back.

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I don't know anything about WW2 US helmets (though I don't doubt AEF's assessment), but I do know that no officer would be seen dead in this absolute dog of a helmet. The whole point of officers having helmets relined was to produce a superior piece of headgear, not something uglier than and considerably inferior to the original product. Any dealer with a modicum of experience and commonsense should know this. I'd send it straight back.

Wainfleet - Thank you for this. I intend to do as you have suggested.

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The liner, which is constructed almost entirely from blue/grey felt and oilcloth and the web chinstrap with the toothed sliding buckle are typical parts of the inter-war US civilian helmets, as is the external washer on the top rivet. The rounded chinstrap loop retainers with their thin split rivets are also typical. The shell may be an original WWI item, but everything else is non-military.

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The shell may be an original WWI item, but everything else is non-military.

This is a point I was also trying to make. It's easy to assume the helmet was made as is, but in fact the shell (which is circa WW1) may well have had a busy life before being eventually refurbished into civilian use.

David

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Sorry, I know virtually nothing about Brodie helmets (just an interested bystander) but shouldn't there be a "heat stamp" somewhere that could help with dating of the shell.?

Cheers, S>S

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I believe it all depends who actually pressed the steel and produced the shell. If it were here in the UK, most likely in Sheffield, then one of several recognizable stamping's would have been applied, but as soon as overseas production is involved, the subject gets much less clear unless the marks found and mentioned in the OP are recognized by someone. The fact that there is no recognizable stamp such as MS of FS does not (in my opinion) mean that the shell will not be circa WW1.

David

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Further thanks to all those above who have rendered assistance on this query.

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