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Remembered Today:

Field Punishment No 1


derekb
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Good Afternoon Everyone,

I am researching a soldier from the KIng's Liverpool Regiment.

On his Casualty Form - Active Service; amongst several entries is this written on 22/02/16 " Awarded 5 days F.P. No1, for - Irregular conduct in getting onto opposed ground without orders" on 07/08/16 he was appointed paid Lance Corporal.

Has anyone got any ideas?

Thanks and regards,

Derek.

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From Wiki but a search of the forum should bring up similar threads.

Field Punishment Number One, often abbreviated to "F.P. No. 1" or even just "No. 1", consisted of the convicted man being placed in fetters and handcuffs or similar restraints and attached to a fixed object, such as a gun wheel or a fence post, for up to two hours per day. During the early part of World War I, the punishment was often applied with the arms stretched out and the legs tied together, giving rise to the nickname "crucifixion". This was applied for up to three days out of four, up to 21 days total. It was usually applied in field punishment camps set up for this purpose a few miles behind the front line, but when the unit was on the move it would be carried out by the unit itself. It has been alleged that this punishment was sometimes applied within range of enemy fire. During World War I Field Punishment Number One was issued by the British Army on 60210 occasions.[1]

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as the alternative to flogging, it was fine idea.

Without particularly wishing to open another door, wasnt execution also introduced when flogging was discontinued?

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It might have just been me, but I took the OP's question to be asking more about the "irregular conduct in getting onto opposed ground without orders", rather than the FP aspect...

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I wonder if he was 'souvenir hunting'? It was a quite common practice but frowned upon by the authorities, seems it would have caused more aggravation than simply getting lost.

Ken

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Without particularly wishing to open another door, wasnt execution also introduced when flogging was discontinued?

Execution on active service was at least done as far back as the Napoleonic wars where flogging was part of the punishment code. The Crimea had no executions for military crime, the Boer wars had a few. The high tide was the Great war. All of this time covered included the "Bloody code" where hung for a sheep could happen, so the overall threat of death was present to everyone.

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As andrew pointed out it was - for - Irregular conduct in getting onto opposed ground without orders" that intrigued me.

regards,

Derek.

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Good Afternoon Everyone,

I am researching a soldier from the KIng's Liverpool Regiment.

On his Casualty Form - Active Service; amongst several entries is this written on 22/02/16 " Awarded 5 days F.P. No1, for - Irregular conduct in getting onto opposed ground without orders" on 07/08/16 he was appointed paid Lance Corporal.

Has anyone got any ideas?

Thanks and regards,

Derek.

It's a bit of a family legend but apparently my great great uncle crawled out of his trench and crossed No Mans Land at an angle to visit his brother who's battalion was in the line next to them. True or not Could this be classed as an example of getting onto opposed ground without orders?
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