Jump to content
The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

8th Field Bakery Coy - Royal Army Service Corps - Private Albert Nicho


rwalsh1988
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi there,

This is my first post, I am 26 and trying to research my family tree for my elderly grandmother who has always wanted to know where her Uncle was buried.

I wasn't given any information aside from his parents name (not even his name!) and have managed to find out the following;

Private Albert Nicholas Dando

Served in the 8th Field Bakery Coy/ Royal Army Service Corps

Died 24th September 1920 at Age 26

He is buried in the war section at Cathays Cemetery in Cardiff, Wales

I also have his service number which was S/360519

I'm basically after any information any one may have concerning the 8th Field Bakery Coy; I have searched online and can't really find anything specific to the 8th Field. If any one were to have any information regarding Albert Dando that would be fantastic, or as an alternative could point me in the direction where I may be able to find out a bit more? I specifically would like to know where he was stationed (although France seems to pop up quite a lot) and if he died in action and if so where etc, just information like that.

This has obviously started off as a project to help my Nan, but through researching and finding out the information I have so far I can see this turning into a hobby so any information would be very much appreciated!

Thank you in advance and please think of me as a complete war novice when explaining things if possible :)

Robyn

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Robyn,

You can start by looking at his Medal Index Card here - http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/D2075492

That will tell you what his medal entitlement is. You should also look for his service records at the National Archives or on Ancestry. Many records were destroyed in the Blitz so they may not have survived. Given his date of death, I would suspect that either a wound or illness (influenza?) may have been the cause. I will have a look to see if I can find out anything about the 8th Field Bakery. These were small units that did not come in company sizes.

All the best,

Gary

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8th Field Bakery was based at Dieppe for the latter part of the war. It was established during the war, merging smaller bakeries into a larger unit.

As he died in the UK, you'd be able to get his death certificate which would show cause of death. His commemoration by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission indicates one of two things. Either he died of something directly related to his service during the war, or he was still a serving soldier at the time of his death and could have died of anything.

This link will tell you much more about how to research a soldier and, also, will explain the jargon and abbreviations that soem folk will post to the thread, forgetting that you won't have a clue what they're talking about. http://www.1914-1918.net/soldiers/research.html

Whilst it may well be (correctly) thought that Field Bakery work would be relatively safe, a goodly number of bakers were transferred to the infantry after the German spring offensive of 1918. They went with minimum infantry training but reinforcements were desperately needed. I know of one man, Fred Osborne, who was a prewar soldier working in a bakery, later with 8th Field Bakery, who was transferred and was badly injured. Something of his story appears in my forthcoming book - "Bully Beef & Biscuits".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Welcome to the forum Robyn, I'm using a phone at present and cant figure out how to post a link but if you either use the forum search box or google '8th Field Bakery, ASC' it will lead to an old forum thread regarding this unit, there are a couple of photos and a relevant link, good hunting

Jom

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The information so far is brilliant!

Waggoner, I have been on the National Archives and found his Medal Card, using the link John sent me I have now been able to decipher it, so from what I can gather he was eligible for the Victory Medal and the British War Medal.

Also, so can you confirm that generally if a soldier died overseas in battle, he was then generally buried overseas? So this would confirm that my Nan's Uncle did not die overseas in action but actually in Cardiff? This is interesting, as she believed he was killed in action for some reason.

As far as viewing the roll of honour, this is only viewable if I travel to the offices in Kew? Is the information held there worth a visit? Will I be able to find out more than what is available online?

One last question, I paid for the medal card from the National Archives, however there were 5 other cards on the document, 2 are definitely not him, but there are 3 other Albert Dando's; is this common for the National Archives to give the document with other names that are of no relation to you?

Jay I will be sure to check out that info, thank you.

Hope my questions make sense and I really appreciate all your help so far!

Thank you :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Robyn,

The war as over for almost two years by the time he died so being killed in action is most likely not the case. My money is still on a war related injury or disease. According to the CWGC site, he is actually buried there.

All the best,

Gary

Link to comment
Share on other sites

He would have served overseas after 1/1/16.

If you go to Long Long Trail. top left of this page and use search for 'service numbers' or it might be 'renumbering' you will see when the seven digit service number was introduced. I am not sure if it was before or after his death. If before he may not have been serving and his death was attributable to army service.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

..............

One last question, I paid for the medal card from the National Archives, however there were 5 other cards on the document, 2 are definitely not him, but there are 3 other Albert Dando's; is this common for the National Archives to give the document with other names that are of no relation to you?

Thank you :)

The National Archives copied all medal cards 6 to a sheet so yes, it is normal the receive copies of 5 others as well as your requested one.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Robyn,

John is referring to my G.Grandfather Fred Osborne. I have a decent picture of the 8th Field Bakery Football team taken in 1917 you are welcome to and any other info I have but you will need to be patient I am afraid - in the process of moving house and also have a long stay in hospital to look forward to, too.

I'll get what I can to you ASAP.

Ant

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Robyn,

He died within the Cardiff Registration District:

Deaths September Quarter 1920

DANDO, Albert N.

Age 25

Cardiff; Volume 11a; Page 335

(From FreeBMD)

Phil

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Brilliant, thank you all so much.

I am going to try and obtain a copy of his death certificate to determine cause of death, so that question can finally be answered.

Where would i find a copy of his service card (if it survived)? Are these held in the National Archives also?

Anthony, it would be so great to know if her Uncle is in that picture! Unfortunately, she never met him and doesn't have any pictures either so identifying him would be tricky, although any info/photos you have would be great and I will be patient!

Thanks again :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are these held in the National Archives also?

All is explained in the link I give earlier.

And, indeed I was referring to Ant's ancestor. Ant kindly gave me permission to use the photos in the book.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...