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Rutland & the Great War


jim_davies

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I have both volumes of Rutland & the Great War should anyone need any look ups.

First volume gives bios of the fallen. Varies in detail.

Second volume lists fallen and roll of honour (all those who served) by village.

As expected mainly Leicesters and Lincolns, especially the 1/5th battalions of both regiments with a fair number of Loos casualities. Other units a little more scare (my g-g-uncle is the only Connaught Ranger).

There are photos of many of the fallen but my copy is not the best. So far none have turned out too well-water damage.

I have also tried to match up the fallen with their CWGC details and local war memorial.

Jim

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Terry Denham

Jim

I have sent you by email a list (very short) of casualties buried in Rutland who do not appear in the CWGC registers for the county - either because they were 'discovered' after publication or have been moved since.

I hope this may be of some use.

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Annette-just a couple of lads.

"2nd Lt Arthur Frederick Taverner.

Son of the Rev. Frederick John Winder Taverner & Mrs Taverner, Wing Rectory, was born at Loughborough on July 25th 1897. He was educated at Stamford Grammer and Oakham School (1909-1915). AT the latter he gained his first eleven and first fifteen colours, and he was also a prefect in his last year. He was given a commission to the 9th KSLI in Sept 1915, and went out to France the following June. On July 25th 1916, (his 19th birthday), he was transferred to the 1st Battalion and was hit by a machine gunbullet while in command of a working party on the night of October 10th 1916, and died on the 11th at Albert. He lies buried in the Grove Town British Cementry, Meaulte."

He is commemerated on the Wing War Memorial Palque-Here's a link to a picture of the memorial. Keith Shelvey has put together a great website with many of Rutland's memorials on it. Its helped me out a great deal.

http://www.capefam.freeserve.co.uk/memor5.htm

The roll of honour for Wing, shows a Lt Roger Lewin Taverner, perhaps Arthur's luckier brother ?

Private Percy Charles Morton, 1/4th KSLI. Shown of the Stretton page, unfortunately no bio. Can't find him on either CWGc or SD.

"2nd Lt James Arthur Merriman Charles"

Only son of the Rev J H Charles, MA RD, Vicar of Oakham, was born at St Andrews Vicaradem Whittlesey, P'boro on Feb 7th 1890. Educated at Harrow & trinity College, Cambridge. On Nov 5th 1914, he was gazetted 2nd Lt in the KSLI, having joined his regt on Special Reserve in Nov 1912. Going out earlier in the war, he took part in the battle of Ypres....Lt Charles was wounded by a bullet in the head at Rue De Bois, Armentieres, on Oct 23, 1914. He was in a trench only 40 yds from the Germans.....for 8 hours he lay in the trench he continued to give orders, his head having been bound by his servant. He was afterwards carried under fire, by two soldiers who had volunteered , to the regimental dressing station...after afterwards sent to Boulogne, and subsquently to King Edward VII's Hospital for Officers at Grosvenor Gardens, London, where he died Feb 10th, 1915. His body was returned from London to Oakham, and he was buried in Oakham Cementry with full military honours.

He was a keen cricketer and played for his "house" at harrow at both football and cricket, and was also 12th man for the Harrow Cricket Eleven 1908. He was also a member of the Harrow Philathletic Society. Two ancestors had served as Admirals of the Fleet of the North (1262 and 1292."

Sorry had to abridge 2nd Lt Charles a little, email me if you need the full text.

If I find anymore I'll let you know.

All the best,

Jim

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Terry-Thanks for the email, I've sent some info I've put together on my g-g-uncle George Boyall, should you be interested.

Jim

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Annette Burgoyne

Hi Jim

First- Thanks for the info. GREAT.

Second - I found a Percy Charles, Moreton, Pte. 14702. Born Onibury, Shropshire resided South Pickenham, Norfolk. Enlisted Stamford. 1/4 K.S.L.I., killed in action 21/3/18. I wonder if this is Private Percy Charles Morton.

Again many thanks

Annette

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Annette,

You're absolutely correct, and here's his info:

"Pte Percy Charles Moreton, of Stretton joined the 1/4th KSLI in Sept 1914 at the age of 19. He trained for some months in various camps in England, and was drafted to France 21st Sept 1915. He took part in the Battle of Loos, and in a brilliant affair when the Shropshires retook a trench near Langemarck. On July 25, 1917 having been wounded in the shoulder, he was sent to hospital at Tunbridge Wells. On recovery he went to Ireland as a drill instructor, having gained his certificate at Portsmouth. He was sent back to France feb 6th 1918 and was killed in action by a piece of shrapnel on March 23 1918 near Bertincourt. He was a tall fine soldier, being at least 6 feet 4 and 1/2 inchs in height, and previous to joining the army was a gamekeeper to Mr Fleetwood Hesketh of Streeton."

Jim

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Hi Jim davies,

I don't mean to follow you around this forum, but you did ask me for a look up for Sidney James Lee. (PRO part of the forum).

I have got photocopies for you. I have sent you a couple of emails, without reply. I am willing to send these onto you without payment, just let me know your address!! I see that you have still sent postings on the forum, and I am just wondering why you asked me to do a lookup, and then when I did, you have never answered me??

Alie.

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Alie,

Please follow me around the forum !

I tried to message you via the forum, but I guess it didn't work. I've been having some difficulties with my email but it now seems sorted.

I really appreciate you taking the time to look up Sid for me. Also please include any costs incurred and I will reimburse.

I wasn't sure if you had sent them and my dad had misplaced or lost them, and was somewhat embarrassed as you went to the trouble of looking Sid up, for them to be lost at my end.

Please accept my deepest regret for the delay.

Best wishes, and thank you again.

Jim

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  • 3 years later...

Jim,

Do you still have both volumes of this book. If so, if at all possible I am looking for references to Henry Tyron of the 8th R.B. I have been led to believe there is a picture and obit from him in these volumes.

Only son of Captain Richard Tyron, of Oakham Hall, Rutland.

Killed in action 15/9/16 while O.C. C. Coy.

He was wounded on 23/11/15 (severely in the neck) during night patrol on which his life was saved by Coprporal Drake who was awarded the V.C. for this.

Andy

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Jim,

Do you still have both volumes of this book. If so, if at all possible I am looking for references to Henry Tyron of the 8th R.B. I have been led to believe there is a picture and obit from him in these volumes.

Only son of Captain Richard Tyron, of Oakham Hall, Rutland.

Killed in action 15/9/16 while O.C. C. Coy.

He was wounded on 23/11/15 (severely in the neck) during night patrol on which his life was saved by Coprporal Drake who was awarded the V.C. for this.

Andy

I am guessing that will be TRYON not Tyron and I don't recognise an "Oakham Hall" but I will have a look in the local library in a day or two.

I don't see the name on Keith Shelvey's Rutland War Memorials site http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~shelvey/...ater%20base.htm

Tryon was a wealthy family in the area with estates mainly in Northants, in Bulwick, Harringworth but also Seaton (Rutland). Posibly Huguenot in origin?

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From the Times.

27-9-1916

post-6536-1168790447.jpg

post-6536-1168790459.jpg

7-10-1916

post-6536-1168790476.jpg

Steve.

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Tryon, Capt Richard, was the eldest son of the late Capt Richard tryon of the Lodge, Oakham. he was born May 17th, 1868, educated at harrow, and was gazetted to the King's Royal Rifles (in which his father served from 1854 to 1867) from the Northamptonshire Militia, January 17th 1891, and joined the 3rd battalion at Jullundur. He became Lietenant September 3rd, 1892, and retired November 27th, 1895, joining the Northamptonshire Yeomanry and Reserve of Officers.

When war broke out he was in South Africa, where he had interests in a gold mining property. He came home at once and joined the 6th Batt, Rifle Brigade, being gaztted Captian under Colonel Dawson, October 28th 1914. He went out to France December 2nd, and was there attached to the 2nd Battalion.

Capt tryon's first engagament was on December 16th, when he had command of 400 men, and he took part in all subsquent fighting near Givenchy La Bassess, until January 10th 1915, when he was killed. The action in which he met his death is described by a brother officer as follows-"There was a railway line with a fairly high embankment on which, previous to December 31st, 1914, we held an advanced post about 50 yards from a strong German position. Behind this, about 100 yards, we had an observation post, and on December 31st the Germans drove out our men and occupied it and the railway embankment between. It became necessary to try and dislodge the enemy from this position, and we were ordered to attack in small parties. I lost 6 of my 10 men, and was being heavily attacked by what others placed at 40 Germans. The observation post was also under heavy Germna machinegun fire. More men were sent up, led by Capt Tryon, wjho at once realised my party was in great danger and tried to come to my assistance. To do this he and his men had to go along the 100 yards of railway line which was exposed to a heavy fire from the German machine guns. He was the only one who got up to my position, but there was not many seconds when he was shot through the head and killed instantly. The remainder of my men were killed or wounded. I myself was wounded but our forward fight allowed our people to strenghten the other post, so that it heald against further attack. About 100 rank and file were killed and wounded. Of six officers who took part, three were killed and three were wounded."

He was a nephew of Lieut. Henry tryon, who fell so gloriously in the attack on the Russian advanced posts before Sebastopol on the night of November 20th, 1854, and also a nephew of Vice-Admiral Sir George Tryon. He married, in 1894 Edith Campbell Watson of Colworth, Bedfordshire, and leaves two sons.

There's also a photo of him-my scanner isn't working, but should be fixed next week.

Jim

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And Henry,

Tryon, Capt Henry, brother of Richard was farming in British Columbia when war broke out. He let his farm and came home at once, and began training in Major G. Tryon's Grenadier Guards' school of instruction at Chelsea barracks. He was given a commission as Lieutenant in the 15th Batt Rifle Brigade December 1st, 1914, and trained with them until August 7th 1915, when he was sent out to France and posted to the 8th Batt Rifle Brigade, which formed part of the 14th Division then holding the Ypres Salient. On the night of November 23rd, Lieut. tryon was out on patrol with three men, one was hit and had to be helped back by another of the party. A little later Lieut Tryon was shot through the neck. Corporal Alfred Drake, who was with him, bound up the wound, regardless of the enmey's fire. Later a rescue party crawling near the German lines found Lieut Tryon and the corporal, the former unconscious but alive and bandaged, and Corporal beside him dead and riddled with bullets. The VC was awarded to Corporal Drake. Of the rescue party Lieut Gorell barnes received the DSO, Lieut Backus the MC, and the two Men; Rfn JE Beazley and Rfn W Hobday the DCM for their bravery and devotion on this occasion.

Lieut Tryon recovered from his wound and returned to light duty again in France, July 26th 1916. He wa spromoted to Capatin in September, and took part in the fighting on the Somme. It was here that the Tanks made their first appearance in the war. On September 15th, the 15th Division {??} to which the 8th Batt Rifle Brigade was attached, advanced to the attack at 6:20am from Delville Wood, and they won their final objective. The trophies on this occasion amounted to 13 machine guns, 3 field guns, 3 heavy howitzers, and about 700 prisoners. But the loss was a terrible one, for only 150 men were left of 600 who started that morning, and later these 150 were found to have taken the trench alone, and were holding it in face of the enemy. Of their 12 officers, Capt Tryon and 12 others were killed, and 3 were wounded. his Colonel wrote-"It was owning to the way Capt Tryon led his men and the glorious example set by him that they went on after he fell and accomplished what they did that day".

Also photo, which I'll try to get for you next week.

Jim

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Steve, Ned and Jim,

What a great response, many thanks indeed it has really helped. I was wondering if there was a family tie in with Lieutenant Tryon of Sebastopol fame.

Once again thanks guys, helped me a lot.

Jim, a picture would be great if at all possible.

Steve, thanks for the Times entries, still got to master them.

Andy

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