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MBrockway

2014 Varsity Rugby Match - commemoration of 55 Fallen Blues

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Old Owl


Leonard PARKER (Marlborough College / Christ Church, Oxford)

Born 25 February, 1886 in Bix, Oxfordshire.

Killed in action at Peronne, 7 January 1917, aged 30.

Blue 1905. Played for Marlborough Nomads.

Became a Land Agent in Yorkshire.

Commissioned on 12 August 1914 as a 2nd Lt on Probation in the Royal Flying Corps Military Wing.

By 1916, he had reached the rank of Major, and Commanded 52 Squadron, RFC, though gazetted to the 15th (The King's) Hussars.

The squadron was attached to 10th Corps of the Fourth Army. The squadron undertook its primary role of Corps reconnaissance.

On 7 January 1917, Parker became the Squadron’s first casualty. With his observer, 2nd Lt Mann, he left Chipilly in an R.E.8 on a photographic patrol. They were shot down half an hour after taking off, north west of Peronne. Parker was killed in the crash, Mann was taken prisoner, and survived the war.

# Tincourt New British Cemetery, Somme, France (Plot X, Row B, Grave 2)


Here's Parker's entry in the Christ Church, Oxford Roll of Honour (full page is here: http://www.chch.ox.ac.uk/cathedral/memorials/WW1/Leonard-Parker)

Major Squadron Commander Leonard PARKER

Royal Flying Corps

Date of birth: 25 February 1886

Date of death: 22 March 1917 (sic - correct date is 07 Jan 1917.

Killed in action aged 31

Buried in the Tincourt New British Cemetery Plot X. B. 2

Leonard was born at Bix, Oxfordshire, the second youngest of the eight children of the Reverend the Hon. Algernon Parker, Rector of Bix, a son of the 6th Earl of Macclesfield, and Emma Jane (nee) Kenyon.

Leonard was educated at Marlborough, coming up to Christ Church in 1905. He appears to have been at the College for only one year and it is not known what he did until he received his Flying Certificate on 28 May 1914. He was flying a Bristol bi-plane at the Bristol School at Brooklands.

On 12 August 1914 he was gazetted as a Second Lieutenant on Probation in the RFC Military Wing.

By 1916, he had reached the rank of Major, and Commanded Fifty Two Squadron which had been the first RFC Squadron to be equipped with the new R.E.8 reconnaissance aircraft [nicknamed ‘Harry Tate’ after a successful music hall comedian of the time]. The unit assembled at Rouen before moving southwards to the Somme Sector, where the Squadron made its home at the large aerodrome situated near Bertangles, a village situated a few miles north of Amiens.

Attached to Tenth Corps of the Fourth Army, the squadron undertook its primary role of Corps reconnaissance, a task which entailed the taking of hundreds of aerial photographs, and sketching maps, often in atrocious weather, of the enemy’s positions in the Corps sector to the east. By December the Squadron had moved eastwards to an airfield near the village of Chipilly. 
 
On the 7 January 1917, the Squadron suffered its first casualty to enemy action. A little before midday Parker and his observer, Second Lieutenant Mann, left Chipilly in an R.E.8 on a photographic patrol. They never returned, having been shot down half an hour after taking off, north west of Peronne. Parker was killed in the crash, Mann was taken prisoner, and survived the war.

Much of the acclaim for the successful achievements of the opening phase of the Arras Offensive can be placed on the shoulders of the airmen of the Royal Flying Corps. Flying their flimsy aircraft, often in atrocious weather, they took thousands of aerial photographs and drew an equal number of sketch maps, pin pointing every German gun position and strongpoint, thus placing in the hands of the British High Command a complete overview of the obstacles they were facing, and ensuring that the British artillery could accurately pinpoint every enemy gun position. The Corps flew innumerable reconnaissance flights over the enemy’s positions and provided close cooperation to the troops on the ground by ‘strafing’ and bombing enemy troop concentrations once the assault began.

Probate was granted to his father on 7 May 1917. He left £873-6s-11d.


Earlier in the Topic, Pal raised doubts about whether the photo of Leonard Parker on the Christ Church, Oxford Roll of Honour website was indeed of Parker.

I've put that picture side by side with a close-up from the 1905 OURFC team photo.

attachicon.gifLeonard Parker - side by side.jpg

... there's certainly a good resemblance, but old owl rightly is not happy with the man on the left not being in RFC uniform.

A possible explanation lies in his entry in the 1916 Q4 Army List ...

attachicon.gifParker - 1916 Q4 Army List 00.jpg

attachicon.gifParker - 1916 Q4 Army List 01.jpg

It seems Parker was ?promoted? Lieutenant in the 15th Hussars for some reason.

It may not be relevant, but I did note in the 1915 Annual Army List, that Capt Frederick Hugh SYKES, of 15th (The King's) Hussars was listed as temp Lt.Col, Commandant, RFC Military Wing.

Working on the possibility that the Christ Church picture may be a man in cavalry uniform, I google-ed the units insignia.

15th (The King's) Hussars cap badge and collar dogs (from FleaBay, so not guaranteed 100% pukka!) ...

$%28KGrHqR,!pwF!MDFKZWnBQO2vwlz9w~~60_35$T2eC16FHJHwFG2%28Ou9V!BSSuuP6GPg~~60_35

If this is the cap badge of the man in the Christ Church photo, then the motto scroll and the 'XV.KH' are obscured behind his hat strap. I'm not sure about the collar dogs either, which we'd earlier taken for stars with a scroll underneath. Certainly a potential explanation of the discrepancy though.

What do you think Robert? A later moustache could make quite a difference to his appearance. Not to mention dozens of photo-reconnaissance sorties in atrocious weather and hostile skies. :poppy:

Mark,

The officer depicted on the Christ Church entry is almost certainly wearing the cap badge and collars of the Essex Regt., I know that there is a similarity between the images and also the badges, but I am still firmly convinced that they are two completely different men.

Perhaps others would like to comment.

Robert

PS Would it be possible to obtain a better copy of the Oxford XV which includes Leonard Parker? Thanks, Robert

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MBrockway

I only know through reading the works of Sir Walter Scott and John Buchan. Those Jocks, eh? What are they like?

My embarassment is compounded - it defiinitely appears in Guy Mannering, which is one of my favourite Scotts, set in Galloway all around where my (non-KRRC) grandfather lived and my boyhood haunts (as is large parts of The Thirty Nine Steps - though I don't remember Writer to the Signet cropping up in that!)

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MBrockway

PS Would it be possible to obtain a better copy of the Oxford XV which includes Leonard Parker? Thanks, Robert

How's this Robert? Any bigger and the size gets too large for the Forum.

post-20192-0-82678100-1416441246_thumb.j

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MBrockway

Mark,

The officer depicted on the Christ Church entry is almost certainly wearing the cap badge and collars of the Essex Regt., I know that there is a similarity between the images and also the badges, but I am still firmly convinced that they are two completely different men.

Perhaps others would like to comment.

Robert

Robert,

Any chance you could post your picture(s) of Parker with moustache etc.? I'm thinking that may well help others comment.

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MBrockway

gallery_20192_897_60108.jpg

Four of the 1908 Oxford XV were among the Fallen (these men also were variously in the 1907, 1909 and 1910 Oxford XV's) ...

Reginald Harold Myburgh HANDS (Diocesan College, Rondebosch, South Africa / University College, Oxford) - DoW, 20 Apr 1918 - A/Major RGA/South African Heavy Artillery

Francis Nathanial TARR (Uppingham / University College, Oxford) - KiA Ypres, 18 Jul 1915 - Lt 1st/4th Leicestershire Regt

Frederic Harding TURNER (Sedbergh / Trinity College, Oxford) - KiA Kemmel, 10 Jan 1915 - 2/Lt 1st/10th (Liverpool Scottish) Battalion, King’s Liverpool Regiment

Lawrence Cave BLENCOWE (St Edward’s School, Oxford / Queen’s College, Oxford) - KiA Belgium, 29 Jun 1917 - 2/Lt 2nd/10th (Liverpool Scottish) Battalion, King’s Liverpool Regiment

:poppy:

Their details follow in separate posts.

Edited by MBrockway

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MBrockway


Reginald Harold Myburgh HANDS (Diocesan College, Rondebosch, South Africa / University College, Oxford)

Born 26 July, 1888 in Cape Town.

Died of wounds after being gassed in Boulogne, France on 20 April, 1918 aged 29.

Blues 1908, 1909. Won 2 England Caps and played for Manchester, Blackheath. Middlesex and Barbarians.

A Rhodes Scholar, he was called to the Bar in 1913

Joined up November 1914 in the South African Heavy Artillery.

2nd Lt from 1 August 1915 and Lt from 23 August 1915

Temporary Captain 15 February 1917 and Acting Major 13 April 1918.

He served in German South West Africa and in France, where he was attached to the Royal Garrison Artillery / 73rd Siege Battery South African Heavy Artillery.

Played in one cricket Test for South Africa. Two other brothers won rugby Blues at Oxford and all played Test cricket.

# Boulogne Eastern Cemetery, Ps de Calais, France (Plot VlI, Row A, Grave 39)

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MBrockway


Francis Nathanial TARR (Uppingham / University College, Oxford)

Born 14 August, 1887 in Derbyshire.

Killed in action Ypres, 18 July 1915 aged 27.

Blues 1907, 1908, 1909. Won 4 England caps and played for Midlands, Headingley, Leicester and Richmond.

Became a solicitor in Leicester.

Enlisted on the first day of WW1 and became Lt, 1/4th Battalion, Leicestershire Regiment, 188th Brigade, 46th (North Midland) Division.

He went to the Western Front with his battalion on 2 March 1915.

# Railway Dugouts Burial Ground, Zillebeke, Ieper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium (Plot l, Row E, Grave 8)

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MBrockway


Frederic Harding TURNER (Sedbergh / Trinity College, Oxford)
Born 29 May, 1888 in Liverpool.
Killed in action at Kemmel, 10 January 1915 aged 26. Died in his own trench while trying to sort out a barbed wire entanglement with his troops.

Blues 1908, 1909, 1910 (Captain). Won 15 Scotland caps and was captain in 1914.

Went into business in Liverpool after leaving Oxford.

Mobilised 4 August 1914 and was 2/Lt, 1st/10th (Liverpool Scottish) Battalion, King’s Liverpool Regiment

# Kemmel Churchyard, Heuvelland, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium (Sp Mem 13)

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MBrockway


Lawrence Cave BLENCOWE (St Edward’s School, Oxford / Queen’s College, Oxford)
Born 31 July 1887, in Banbury.
Killed in action in Belgium, 29 June 1917 aged 29.

Blues 1907, 1908. England trialist who played for Yorkshire, Headingley, Harlequins and Barbarians.

Became an assistant master at Orleton Prep School, Scarborough.

Joined up 26 Aug 1916 and was 2/Lt in 2nd/10th (Liverpool Scottish) Battalion, King’s Liverpool Regiment

# Ploegsteert Memorial (Panel 3) Comines-Warneton, Hainaut, Belgium

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MBrockway

Mark,

The officer depicted on the Christ Church entry is almost certainly wearing the cap badge and collars of the Essex Regt., I know that there is a similarity between the images and also the badges, but I am still firmly convinced that they are two completely different men.

Perhaps others would like to comment.

Robert

Robert - I agree.

The outer edge of the badge in the Christ Church photo appears uneven and that's more suggestive of the Essex Regt's oak leaf wreath than the 15th Hussars' parallel circlet formed from a garter belt. There's also a hint of the sphinx and the central part of the Gibraltar castle.

We'll have to challenge the other Pals to find a connection between Leonard Parker and the Essex Regiment. Perhaps someone could check his promotion notices in the London Gazette for possible leads?

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Steven Broomfield

My embarassment is compounded - it defiinitely appears in Guy Mannering, which is one of my favourite Scotts, set in Galloway all around where my (non-KRRC) grandfather lived and my boyhood haunts (as is large parts of The Thirty Nine Steps - though I don't remember Writer to the Signet cropping up in that!)

I'm currently reading Huntingtower - it's in there :thumbsup:

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Old Owl

Robert - I agree.

The outer edge of the badge in the Christ Church photo appears uneven and that's more suggestive of the Essex Regt's oak leaf wreath than the 15th Hussars' parallel circlet formed from a garter belt. There's also a hint of the sphinx and the central part of the Gibraltar castle.

We'll have to challenge the other Pals to find a connection between Leonard Parker and the Essex Regiment. Perhaps someone could check his promotion notices in the London Gazette for possible leads?

Many thanks Mark for the enlargement of Leonard Parker. If you could PM me your email address then I shall send you a copy of the photo (complete with moustache) and then perhaps you could post on here for comments.

Cheers, Robert

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MBrockway

I'm currently reading Huntingtower - it's in there :thumbsup:

About 18 months since, I picked up a set of the Melrose Edition of the Waverley novels, only missing The Bride of Lammermoor. It was part of a Lot of five boxes of mixed books in a General Sale including a dozen or so excellent original Collins New Naturalist series and some music scores, and I got the lot for £10!

The same auction had a set of Buchans lurking in another similar mixed lot, which I bid on, but I had to drop out when the bidding went past £75 - the vagaries of general sales eh? :(

Not read Huntingtower yet, but IIRC that's another set in Galloway/Ayrshire? My (non-KRRC) grandfather was born in Newmilns in Ayrshire and spent most of his youth in Ayrshire and Galloway, before he came to England in WW2. He eventually retired to Creetown and then Whithorn. He requested we scatter his ashes at the high point of the Newton Stewart/Straiton road, which is also the Ayrshire/Stewartry county boundary, so he could keep an eye on his people both north and south.

I cut my mountaineering teeth tramping solo in the Galloway Hills including much of the area around the old Dumfries-Stranraer railway line that features so much in The Thirty Nine Steps.

I must get back on with the Buchans - I had a spell of working through Buchan, Geoffrey Household and Erskine Childers adventures years back and enjoyed them tremendously. The Scotts sadly are still languishing in a cardboard box in a corner of my study - I don't have the three foot of spare shelf space they'll need! Also I find them just that wee bit too 'fussy' these days and always seem to have something more tempting to hand when I look for the next read :blush:

However ... I digress, and I'm well off topic now!

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MBrockway
On 21/11/2014 at 09:48, old owl said:

Many thanks Mark for the enlargement of Leonard Parker. If you could PM me your email address then I shall send you a copy of the photo (complete with moustache) and then perhaps you could post on here for comments.

Cheers, Robert

Here are all three images - Robert's picture of Parker in the RFC, the picture from Christ Church of an Essex Regt infantry officer and Parker from the 1905 Blues XV ...

Leonard Parker - side by side by side.jpg

What do we all think?

 

Edited by MBrockway

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David_Underdown

Looks like his service record is WO 339/21579 might answer the question as to whether he was posted to Essex Regiment at any time.

This looks like a skeleton AIR 76 record AIR 76/388/7 (they were often created even for those who had died before the creation of the RAF (and he was initially only reported missing). This does mention 15th Hussars, but nothing about any other regimental affiliation.

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MBrockway

gallery_20192_897_23445.jpg

Three of the 1909 Oxford XV were among the Fallen (two of these men were also variously in the 1910 and 1911 XV's) ...

Thomas ALLEN (Cheltenham College / Trinity College, Oxford) - KiA Guinchy, 26 Feb 1915 - 2/Lt., Irish Guards

Ronald William POULTON-PALMER (R.W. POULTON above) (Rugby School / Balliol College, Oxford) - KiA Ploegsteert Wood, 05 May 1915 - Lt., 4/Royal Berkshire Regt

Ronald Owen LAGDEN (Marlborough College / Oriel College, Oxford) - KiA St Eloi, 03 Mar 1915 - A/Maj. 4/KRRC

:poppy:

These three team-mates all lost their lives within a single ten week period in 1915

Their details follow in separate posts.

Edited by MBrockway

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MBrockway


Thomas ALLEN (Cheltenham College / Trinity College, Oxford)

Born 24 September 1887 in Tewkesbury.

Killed in action when a shell hit the trenches at Guinchy on 26 February 1915 aged 27. He had been at the front line for only three weeks.

Blue in 1909. Played for Harlequins.

He was head of the Trinity College, Oxford Mission in Stratford, London. It was named The Tom Allen Club in his memory after WW1

Joined up 24 September 1914 and was a 2nd Lieutenant in the Irish Guards.

Served in France and Belgium.

# Cuinchy Communal Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France (Plot II, Row B, Grave 34)

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MBrockway


Ronald William POULTON-PALMER (Rugby School / Balliol College, Oxford)
Born 12 September 1889 in Headington.
Killed in action by a sniper at Ploegsteert Wood, Belgium, 5 May 1915 aged 25.

Blues 1909, 1910 and 1911 (Captain).

Won 17 England caps and played for Midlands, Harlequins and Liverpool.

Captained England to 1914 Grand Slam and also completed Slam in 1913.

Worked for Huntley & Palmer Biscuits, the family company based in Reading.

Mobilised in August 1914 and was Lt in 4th Royal Berkshire Regiment.

# Hyde Park Corner (Royal Berks) Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemetery, near Ploegsteert, Belgium (Row B, Grave 11)

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MBrockway

Ronald Owen LAGDEN (Marlborough College / Oriel College, Oxford)
Born 21 November 1889 in Maseru, Basutoland.
Killed in action when leading an attack on enemy trenches at St Eloi, Belgium (The Mound, Ypres Salent) on 3 March 1915 aged 25.

Blues 1909, 1910, 1911. Also won Blues at Cricket (1909-1912), Hockey (1910-1911) and Rackets (1909).

Won 1 England cap and kicked two conversions in Calcutta Cup win over Scotland. Also played for Richmond.

A Rhodes Scholar, he was President of Vincents Club 1912.

He was a schoolmaster at Harrow.

He enlisted on the first day of WW1 on 4 August 1914 joining 4th Battalion King’s Royal Rifle Corps.

Promoted to Captain 24 November 1914, later Acting Major, 6th Battalion, attached to the 4th Battalion, King’s Royal Rifle Corps, 80th Brigade, 27th Division.

Went to France in early 1915 and Commanded company at St Eloi sector, 15 miles north of Neuve Chapelle on the Ypres salient.

Was one of 150 men killed or wounded in attack on German lines on 3 March 1915.

Mentioned in despatches 1915.

# Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium (Panel 51 and 53)


His obituary in the 1915 KRRC Chronicle ...

gallery_20192_897_59853.jpg

post-20192-0-29609200-1417036680_thumb.j

post-20192-0-99668400-1417036689_thumb.j

post-20192-0-70900200-1417036697_thumb.j

There is a good account of the Action at St ELOI, where Lagden fell, in the 4/KRRC Battalion War Record in the KRRC Chronicle running over several pages. I will scan this in eventually, but probably after I have posted all the team photos.

Edited by MBrockway

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rugbyremembers

Mark,

Great work here. I will be at the Varsity match, for the first time since the 80s and hoping for a change in Tab fortunes.

I am also working frantically on a new book on rugby and the Great War, this time covering the whole club/country spectrum (admittedly selectively by necessity) rather than just one club, Rosslyn Park.

Should be a special occasion.

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MBrockway

Apologies, Pals, for the gap in my postings - Real Life intervening! I should get the Oxford team photos completed this week.

gallery_20192_897_64556.jpg

Five of the 1911 Oxford XV were among the Fallen (these men also were variously in the 1910, 1911, 1912 and 1913 Oxford XV's) ...

David McLaren BAIN (Edinburgh Academy / Trinity College, Oxford) - KiA, 03 Jun 1915 - Capt, 3rd att. 2nd Gordon Highlanders
William Purdon GEEN (Haileybury / University College, Oxford) - KiA, 31 Jul 1915 - 2/Lt, 9/KRRC
Allan GILMOUR (Edinburgh Academy / Trinity College, Oxford) - DoW, 16 Dec 1917, Salonika - Capt, 2/Lovat Scouts, att. 10/QOCH
Arthur James DINGLE (Durham School / Keble College, Oxford) - KiA, 22 Aug 1915, Gallipoli - Capt, 6th East Yorks
Stephen Sebastian Lombard STEYN (Diocesan College, Rondebosch, S Africa / University College, Oxford) - KiA, 08 Dec 1917, Palestine - Lt, 117th Bde, RFA
:poppy:

Their details follow in separate posts (it'll be tomorrow now) and several also appear in the 1912 team photo.

Edited by MBrockway

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MBrockway


David McLaren BAIN (Edinburgh Academy / Trinity College, Oxford)
Born 10 September 1891 in Edinburgh.
Killed in action at Festubert, France, 3 June 1915 aged 23. He had been wounded in March, but returned to front line.

Blues 1910, 1911, 1912 (Secretary) and 1913 (Captain). Won 11 Scotland caps and captained the side in the defeat to Wales in 1914.

Joined up 15 August 1914 and became a Captain, 3rd Battalion, Gordon Highlanders, attached to 2nd Battalion, 20th Brigade, 7th Division.

# Brown’s Road Military Cemetery, Festubert, France (Plot VIII, Row F, Grave 14)

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MBrockway


William Purdon GEEN (Haileybury / University College, Oxford)
Born 14 March 1891 in Newport.
Killed in action at Hooge, Ypres, Belgium, 31 July 1915 aged 24.

Blues 1910, 1911, 1912, 1913. Won 3 Wales caps and played for Newport, Blackheath, Monmouthshire and Barbarians. Also played for England v The North 1910.

Joined 60th, King’s Royal Rifle Corps in August 1914 and went to Western Front in May 1915.

His battalion withdrawn but two days later was ordered back with 9th to reinforce 41st Brigade in Second Battle of Ypres.

He was 2/Lt in 9th Battalion and one of 350 from B Company killed that day during heavy bombardment and enemy attack Hooge, Flanders.



# Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium (Panel 51 and 53)

*** 2/Lt William Geen was almost certainly killed during the actions connected to the German Flammenwerfer attack at Hooge, but I am away from my books at the moment.

Andy and I have covered the Hooge action extensively in earlier topics.

I'll update this post with additional info and links to our prior Hooge topics once I'm back home! ***

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MBrockway


Allan GILMOUR (Edinburgh Academy / Trinity College, Oxford)
Born 26 August 1889 in Rosehall, Sutherland.
Died of wounds Salonika, 16 December 1917 aged 27.

Blue 1911. Played for West of Scotland and Edinburgh Academicals.

Mobilised 4 August 1914 and was Captain in 2nd Lovat Scouts attached to 10th Battalion Queen’s Own Cameron Highlanders. Served in Egypt and Palestine.

# Lahana Military Cemetery, Lachanas, Greece (Plot lll, Row B, Grave 16)

His son was born on 23 November 1916, and became Colonel Sir Allan Gilmour MC and Bar, who also went to Trinity and served in WW2 ,also with the Lovat Scouts, attached to the Seaforths.

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MBrockway


Arthur James DINGLE (Durham School / Keble College, Oxford)
Born 16 October 1891 in Hetton-le-Hole, Durham.
Killed in action in Suvla Bay, Gallipoli when he was shot in trenches on 22 August 1915 aged 24.

His brother, Hugh, was killed in Battle of Jutland nine months later, aged 23.

Blue 1911. Won 3 England caps and played for Hartlepool Rovers, Rosslyn Park, Durham County, The North and Barbarians. He scored 55 tries in the 1913/14 season.

He became a schoolmaster at his old alma mater, Durham School in 1913.

Commissioned into East Yorkshire Regiment in September 1914 and became Captain in 6th battalion.

# Helles Memorial, Turkey (Panel 51-54)

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