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Remembering


PhilB

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Remembering all those who fought in the 2nd Battle of Passchendaele, 3rd Ypres, 26/10/17. In particular, 241411 Pte Fred Hoggarth, 2/5 King`s Own, KIA that day.

"The troops were quickly bogged down & completely at the mercy of the pillboxes which covered their whole front"

An officer of 170 Brigade wrote "I have never seen such a sight as that country was. Nothing on earth but the wonderful courage of the Lancashire lads enabled them to get as far as they did".

No Known Grave Tyne Cot Memorial.

Phil B

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Remembering all those who fought in the 2nd Battle of Passchendaele, 3rd Ypres, 26/10/17. In particular, 241411 Pte Fred Hoggarth, 2/5 King`s Own, KIA that day.

"The troops were quickly bogged down & completely at the mercy of the pillboxes which covered their whole front"

An officer of 170 Brigade wrote "I have never seen such a sight as that country was. Nothing on earth but the wonderful courage of the Lancashire lads enabled them to get as far as they did".

No Known Grave Tyne Cot Memorial.

Phil B

Thank you Phil. See my signature.

Robbie

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Thank you Phil. Another man to die that day was Private 10497 Arthur Bartlett, 2nd Battalion, Honourable Artillery Company, working as a stretcher bearer in waist deep mud. He is buried at Hooge Crater Cemetery.

'Despite its losses the Battalion was sent up the line again on 26th October, this time with the Royal Welsh Fusiliers to relieve two battalions which had been shattered in an attack that morning. The mud was worse than ever – waist deep in places – and the doomed battalions had been quite unable to keep up with the barrage, so were mown down by machine guns as they floundered through the morass. There was no line to take over, the relieving battalions having to search for the few survivors in the mass of waterlogged shell-holes. Through the night the HAC were chiefly employed in rescuing wounded bogged in shell-holes. Forty or fifty of these were brought in. On the evening of the 28th the Battalion, which had suffered another 40 casualties from shells and snipers, was relieved.'

The Honourable Artillery Company 1537-1987

Sue

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I`ve always got the impression that the actions around this time were among the worst that any soldiers were ever directed to face. I find it hard to credit that commanders could choose to commit men to battle in conditions like those in the Salient at that time. Phil B

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We are working on an 'Interactive overview of the battles in Flanders Fields'.

Love it, thanks mate.

Robbie

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