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Remembered Today:

1st Batt. Royal Scots Fusiliers & 1/10th Royal Scots Uniform


Swally
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Hi Guys it's been a while,

Would anyone have information on and possibly a picture of 1st Batt. Royal Scots Fusiliers & 1/10th Royal Scots Uniform in uniform please?

One of my Great Uncles James Allan Pte 999 of the Royal Scots 1/10th Cyclists who later transferred to the 1st Batt Royal Scots Fusiliers in order to go to France in roughly June / July 1916. He managed to survive after being seriously injured and lying beside a dead officer for 5 days before being captured. He stated that he was given the best medical attention that was available to his captures. He was later sent back to the UK in 1918 as an exchange of prisoners via Switzerland.

Colour pictures would be even better with an explanation of the style etc.

Wishing you all the best,

Swally

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Hi Swally

Here is a photo of the 1st Royal Scots Fusiliers in 1918 (they are the ones on the left) - this is the uniform that they wore from 1916 onwards (i.e. very standard British uniform - neither 1st R.S.F. or 10th R.S. were kilted).

10th Royal Scots were a territorial battalion engaged throughout the war on coastal defense in East Lothian, but which provided drafts of men to Royal Scots and Royal Scots Fusiliers battalions, particularly the regular battalions which suffered huge casualties. Royal Scots and Royal Scots Fusiliers constantly supplied each other with men and materials, which sometimes causes confusion when trying to trace men.

1st RSF were heavily engaged in the 3rd Divisions attack on Bazentin Ridge 14th July 1916, but I am not aware of them losing any men taken prisoner. They did have prisoners taken in November 1916 at Serre, at Arras spring 1917, and in the German spring offensive of 1918, so perhaps he was captured in one of these actions.

William

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Willrev,

I have a copy of the War Diary of the 1st Batt Royal Scots Fusiliers. I take it this is the record of them having been taken prisoner in November 1916?

This is when I think my Great Uncle James Allan Pte 43085 was taken prisoner.

The photo is good but do you have anything of a soldier on his own facing the camera?

Extract from The Royal Scots Fusiliers War Diary from the 13th of November 1916

Trenches (Serre Sector)

13/11/1916 Battalion forming with the 2nd Royal Scots on its right the front line of the 8th Brigade moved into assembly positions in front of Rob Roy trench at 5 a.m. At 5.45 a.m. (Zero Hour) the intensive bombardment began and continued for 5 minutes during which the assaulting line (“A” & “B” Coys) moved forward to within 30ft of German line. These two Coys crossed the German front line with but little opposition and penetrated to the enemy’s second line, where they were held up by uncut wire behind his Parados. All dugouts in Front and second line were bombed.
Owing to the fog, the trench was lost with the troops on the left and right and with supporting troops and as there was danger of being surrounded and cut off the officers commanding “A” & “B” companies decided to withdraw to our own front line. The German front line was unattainable due to mud. Situation was reported to 8th Brigade at 8.35 a.m. All units received orders to reform in their original areas and report strength. After re-organisation in Rob Roy
Company strengths are as follows – “A” 32, “B” 6, “C” 24, “D”10 “Spec” 25. Portions of “A” & “B” companies appeared to have been taken prisoners. Attack was only partially successful the chief cause of failure to maintain our hold in the enemy’s line were thick fog and mud.
For the remainder of the day Enemy’s barrage was exceptionally heavy, much of Rob Roy been blown in.

Total Casualties – Officers:-
Killed Wounded

Lieut H.C.Shatt Captain W.C.Fraser
2nd Lieut J.A. Strange
2nd Lieut H. Garvan
2nd Lieut J. E Dalrymple - Hay

Other Ranks

Killed 21, Died of Wounds 2, Wounded 93, Missing 83, Wounded & Missing 2.

Total 201

There is no mention of them loosing any further men until the 18th. I presume that they waited a few days before they officially reported him missing, now whether he was one of the "Missing" or "Wounded and missing I don't know.

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Hi Swally

If you think that November 1916 (rather than Spring 1917 at Arras) fits in with what you know about your great uncle, then I think that the Serre action on 13th November is the most likely occasion for him to have been taken prisoner. (The trenches that they attacked from were exactly the same ones from which 31st Division had attacked on July 1st, and which can still be seen and visited in Sheffield Park.)

Because the attack was unsuccessful (Serre was never taken in battle - the Germans eventually abandoned it in spring 1917 when they withdrew to the Hindenberg Line, and the British walked in), 1st RSF left a lot of men dead in No Man's Land, so they might not have known whether a missing man was dead or taken prisoner for months, or ever. So I think that you are right in thinking that they waited a few days before reporting him missing.

When wearing helmets, 1st RSF looked just like most other British battalions - nothing Scottish to see in the other ranks uniforms, with the 3rd Division logo in yellow on their arm. Out of the line they wore glengarries for the first couple of years, and then tam-o-shanters from 1917 until the end of the war.

William

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Here is a photo of an individual RSF soldier in khaki drill hot weather uniform.

There are also good individual photos at these links (click on image to enlarge):

1. http://ancestorsstories.blogspot.co.uk/p/ww1_28.html

2. http://www.saintpatrickskilsyth.org.uk/saintpatricks/images/WW1/14308%20Private%20James%20Molloy.jpg

post-599-0-54359700-1405678631_thumb.jpg

post-599-0-08520700-1405678670_thumb.jpg

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And the Colour Party.

post-599-0-76179600-1405678951_thumb.jpg

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Here are men from 1st Battalion Royal Scots Fusiliers in Gosport in the early months of the war, and old sweats later on, possibly in 1916.

post-49411-0-81853600-1405704548_thumb.j

post-49411-0-15051800-1405704616_thumb.j

William

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William, thanks for the info

Swally

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Frogsmile, cracking picture thank you

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