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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

webley MkVl


Khaki

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khaki,

Always nice to see a Webley Mk.VI, has it had a WW2 wartime painted finish applied ?

Regards,

LF

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Yes it has the paint job, I don't know whether to strip it down or just leave it alone, it was a friendly price and it is still in .455. I might just leave it be as I don't see any evidence of underlying blue. I still need to know a bit more about the history of the paint preservative. I think in the case of rifles, a lot were done in India. One thing getting older has taught me, don't be in a rush to change things.

As always good to hear from you.

regards

khaki

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Yes it has the paint job, I don't know whether to strip it down or just leave it alone,

khaki

khaki,

I would tend to agree with you regarding leaving it ' as is '. The paint was probably applied by an Armourer, or as part of a factory refurbishment.

Trying to strip off the paint could end up with you having to re-blue the whole thing, which is not inexpensive.

The fact that it is still in the original .455 calibre is excellent news.

Enjoy your new purchase.

Regards,

LF

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Very nice Khaki & as LF said still in 455 so that has to be a bonus for you :thumbsup:

Any idea of what year it was made ?

All the best.

JD

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Thanks JD

1918, I also have an Australian marked issued one dated 1918.

khaki

I have to add that although I understand that to some collectors originality is important where the matter of a cylinder has been skimmed from.455 to .45acp, but to me it is nice but is not a detraction to me. To each his own.

(k)

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Thanks JD

1918, I also have an Australian marked issued one dated 1918.

khaki

I have to add that although I understand that to some collectors originality is important where the matter of a cylinder has been skimmed from.455 to .45acp, but to me it is nice but is not a detraction to me. To each his own.

(k)

I'm jealous now Mate a Australian mark MVI too :thumbsup:

I agree with what you are saying about originality of military firearms too as long as it's safe & fun to shoot I like it !!!!

All the best

JD

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Thanks JD

1918, I also have an Australian marked issued one dated 1918.

khaki

I have to add that although I understand that to some collectors originality is important where the matter of a cylinder has been skimmed from.455 to .45acp, but to me it is nice but is not a detraction to me. To each his own.

(k)

I agree entirely with the sentiment but in this instance as the .45ACP was never an issue weapon and never a conversion done officially (and really just a sales ploy in the US - the safety of which with some modern +P .45 ACP might be an issue) for me, one in original .455 calibre is worth a premium. The finish on the other hand as an official refinish is not something I would ever consider removing nor would I consider it a significant detraction.

Just my 2p

Chris

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In an abstract way we (USA) are lucky that the conversions were done, if they hadn't there would have probably have been minimal numbers in the US, and the rest would have been consigned to the melting pot. I just appreciate their history and a 1/32nd more or less of cylinder metal doesn't stop me doing that.

khaki

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I agree entirely with the sentiment but in this instance as the .45ACP was never an issue weapon and never a conversion done officially (and really just a sales ploy in the US - the safety of which with some modern +P .45 ACP might be an issue) for me, one in original .455 calibre is worth a premium. The finish on the other hand as an official refinish is not something I would ever consider removing nor would I consider it a significant detraction.

Just my 2p

Chris

I just reread your post, reference 'never an official conversion', and I recall someone posting a comment that some were done in WW2 Britain due to the shortage of .455 and the huge quantities of .45acp. I also have reference to that in my small library, and it is an interesting possibility to consider.

khaki

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I would love to see a reference to this contention.

To my knowledge that was not the case....that is not to say that was not what was advertised in the 50s and 60s when these were commonly available, but that is not my understanding..(there is no listing of this conversion in Skennerton's Small Arms of WW2 which is reasonably comprehensive in such matters)

I am happy to admit that I am out of my areas of knowledge here - however in firearms terms 1/32" of metal removed is rather a big deal IMHO.

Chris

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Hello Chris I'll see if I can dig out the book as a reference, from memory its a ww2 book on British uniforms and equipment.

khaki

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How about one that is missing the 1/32nd" at the back and 2 3/4" at the front??

I picked this up as a parts gun (It also has a broken right grip panel). It was a throw-in on a No.2 Mark IV .38 I bought.

It's actually not in too bad shape other than the missing metal. The grip panel I can get. Uncut cylinders are virtually

non-existent in the US, but I might be able to find a barrel. It will be mis-matched, but should make a decent shooter.

I've also considered just cobbling up a front sight and having a "Pocket Mark VI" :whistle:

(It is dated 1917 and carries the standard commercial proofs.)

CutWebley.jpg

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I do recall seeing them advertised as a sort of 'private detectives' revolver, I don't think that too many would have been shortened as yours is the first I have seen. It would be good if you could restore it to its full length barrel. Mismatched numbers are better than a chopped barrel in my opinion.

Good luck

khaki

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Although virtually all the shortened Webleys are fakes made for the American market, some pistols were officially shortened after the war.

This is a British issue .455 inch Spanish Old Pattern (O.P.) revolver that was supplied to the New South Wales Police after WWI where it was shortened, had a new foresight added and the butt cut down. Quite a "belly gun"!

Regards

TonyE

post-8515-0-91883200-1395490822_thumb.jp

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Webley made revolvers with a shorter 3 inch barrel, and also at least one with a 2 inch barrel, these were Mark III and IV in .38 calibre.

LF

post-63666-0-93755400-1395493798_thumb.j

post-63666-0-39990100-1395493812_thumb.j

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I wonder if the reason it was shortened was that it had a jacketed 45 ACP bullet or two stuck somewhere up front that bulged the barrel?

I recall seeing a Mark VI that had seven bullet in the barrel. Th only thing that stopped the owner from firing more was that one of the bullets finally partially forced its way through the top of the barrel and blocked the sight picture....

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