Jump to content
The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

Through These Lines, NSW regional tour


b3rn
 Share

Recommended Posts

Through These Lines is an original Australian play based on the narratives, letters and diaries of Australian army nurses serving in WWI.

The writer is my wife Cheryl Ward, who is working with a fantastic director and a fine group of actors. The NSW regional tour kicks off 24 July — 5 August 2014 with a season at Fort Scratchley, Newcastle (the Australian Newcastle).

The first production of the play was staged in a barrel vaulted ammunition store (5m x 9m x 2.5m), accessed via 50 meters of tunnels, approximately 5 metres underground, at Middle Head, Sydney. The facility once protected the entrance to Port Jackson. This production is also to be performed in a unique venue. Fort Scratchley was constructed 1881-1882 for coastal defence, and its guns fired on Japanese submarine I-21 which shelled the city on 8 June 1942. The army left the site in 1972.

Tickets for the Newcastle shows are on sale now: http://www.civictheatrenewcastlebookings.com.au/

Your support will be greatly appreciated!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bernard, hope it goes well. Any plans for Canberra?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's a possibility. Certainly in the region. Will let you know of dates when they're confirmed.

Pals, if you're in the Newcastle region, or have friends there, let them know it's a piece well worth catching.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Website is now live - http://throughtheselines.com.au/2014/newcastle

Tickets on sale for Newcastle, South West Rocks and Lismore. More venues will be announced soon.

Please tell your friends, we need your support.

https://www.facebook.com/throughtheselines

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

201.jpg

Update on the tour schedule -

Newcastle - Fort Scratchley, 24 July – 5 August
South West Rocks - Trial Bay Gaol, 8 August – 10 August
Coffs Harbour - Bunker Cartoon Gallery, 13 August – 17 August
Lismore - Lismore City Hall, 20 August
Lithgow - Lithgow Small Arms Factory Museum, 22 August – 24 August
Manildra - Soldiers Memorial Hall, 26 August – 27 August
Cootamundra - Ex-Serviceman's Club, 29 August – 30 August
Wagga Wagga - Kyeamba Smith Hall, 2 September
Mittagong - Mittagong Playhouse, 4 September
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Introducing the cast and crew... http://throughtheselines.com.au/cast-and-creatives

Scripts have been distributed, rehearsals begin soon... Costumes are being made, the set is about to be built and we have a weapons permit.

Performance dates on the website:

http://throughtheselines.com.au

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Pals, preview for this play is Thursday at Fort Scratchley, Newcastle, opening night Friday. Four winners of a radio competition will fire the 6-inch guns before the show.

I've updated the tour schedule above. Included are shows at Coffs in a WW2-era bunker, and at Mittagong Playhouse, once the Memorial Hall.

Please spread the word. This is an independent production, by a great team of theatre professionals, but we could use your help getting word to people in Manildra, Cootamundra, South West Rocks, etc!

Sydney shows, at the Australian National Maritime Museum, will soon be announced.

http://throughtheselines.com.au

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Pleased to report that the play is going well - I was able to catch the last night at Fort Scratchley, great venue for an intimate audience of 50 to 60, up close with the actors. Audience reviews have been positive: http://throughtheselines.com.au/reviews

Last night, my sister (who is a Nurse) and myself saw the final performance of "Through These Lines" at Fort Scatchley in Newcastle. Having heard good reports, but unsure of what we would see and how it would work at the venue, we were stunned by the performances of the cast.
The venue, of an empty 80 pounder cannon chamber within the Fort with its whitewashed finish fitted the story to perfection. The audience of about 50 gathered either side of the performance area and this produced an intimate environment. In what I would call the "kissing scene" I saw the women of the audience opposite me, eyes all drawn to the action and a smile on each face.
The cast interchanged flawlessly and movement of props flowed without disturbing the story. The cast and crew can be very proud of the show they are doing and I hope that all venues equal what they have achieved in Newcastle. Cheryl Ward who played a number a Nurses, and a Matron (my sister thinks she trained under that Matron), but also wrote the play and has made an excellent effort in bringing all aspects good and bad into the spotlight.
I hope to see it again in Sydney and also hope that it will be taken around Australia and it is not just NSW who enjoy this treasure in the 100th anniversary of War to End Wars.
Andrew Rennie 06/08/2014
I would like to thank Kirsty Harris and Sue Light whose commitment to the nursing services' story continues to be an inspiration. There is no need to embellish their story. The GWF forum has also been a good guide, your discussions are helpful in reflecting the many and varied perspectives on a complex and difficult period of our shared history. And of course the story is not at its end.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

261.jpg

Uniform boffins, do cut us some slack. These production images were shot before all uniforms were complete.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Hope all is going well Cheryl and Bern and hope one day you will be able to bring the show south of the border!

K

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cheers Kirsty. Performances this weekend in the Smalls Arms Factory Museum at Lithgow. One of those museums with incredible collections... the bayonet rising sun will make a unique backdrop to the action.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...
The Sydney season is being presented in association with the Australian National Maritime Museum, to coincide with the exhibition 'War at Sea: the navy in WWI.'
Thursday 25 September, 6.30pm
Friday 26 September, 6.30pm
Saturday 27 September, 6.30pm
Sunday 28 September, 2pm & 6.30pm
Friday 3 October, 6.30pm
Saturday 4 October, 6.30pm
Sunday 5 October, 2pm & 6.30pm
$55 / $45 members & concessions
Discounts for groups 10+
Tickets also available on the door, but cash only

Evening shows start at 7.30pm - come from 6.30pm to see the exhibition 'War at Sea': the navy in WWI' and have a complimentary beer or wine

The play is 85 minutes, no interval

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rats, neatly missing my brief time in Sydney.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Got time for a beer or a meal during your stay, David?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I went along to see the play last weekend and have to agree that it is well worth seeing. The cast is small but it is cleverly done with some cast members having dual roles. It has also been a while since I had been to the theatre and had forgotten how different it works to a screen. In a small dark theatre with the actors entering the stage from behind and beside you it made for a good atmosphere!

No qualms about the uniforms either Bernard- although some shoulder patches would be good. ^_^

Well done.

Scott

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Scott.

Audiences have been very positive. Entertained, emotionally engaged for 85 minutes, what more can you ask?

Reviews have been interesting.

I'd like to talk about this comment, from what I think is a generally thoughtful review of the show: "it doesn't necessarily offer a portrayal of the First World War overly removed from many of the traditions and myths that have been attached to it for the last thirty years."

My question is: which myths?

The play sets itself in 1915-1918, it does not attempt a modern interpretation of events (a job for the audience). It is the nurses' story, its themes are not the themes of 'Oh What A Lovely War' (which I hold in high regard as a dramatic work). It doesn't suggest the women are angels. It doesn't suggest the men are anything more than what they were. I am suspicious of nationalism, but I don't think any history buff would claim otherwise but that Anzac is a (the?) defining moment in our national identity. And those women who served in the nursing services off Gallipoli were entitled to the Anzac "A" badge, not after the fact, but at the time. They also made their name in the Dardanelles, and beyond.

Anzac has been co-opted by everyone who wants to make a political point, so I understand a level of cynicism, but it's a concern that, for some, what happened - captured, albeit imperfectly, in tens of thousands of primary source documents - didn't.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had a good think about this Bernard and agree I can't see where any myths were perpetuated.

Scott

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...