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Remembered Today:

134th Cornwall Heavy Battery


KONDOA
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Anyone have any information regarding this outfit?? I know they were in East Africa but would appreciate any other snippets to fill out their resume.

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The only Cornwall Heavy Batteries I know are the two that formed part of the Cornwall (Duke of Cornwalls) RGA

They were based at Falmouth and served in the UK as part of the Coast defences in both world wars

This battery must be a locally raised New Army unit

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Allocations of Heavy Batteries RGA indicates that 134th Heavy Battery went out to East Africa on 26 Dec 1915 and arrived in Mombassa on 1 Feb 1916 and was armed with four 5.4" Breach Loading Howitzers. There is no record of the Battery after December 1917. The unit's war diary from Dec 1915 to Dec 1917 can be found at the National Archives under WO95/5314.

Regards. Dick Flory

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Many thanks again Dick, the date of embarkation had thrown me there. By what I can infer, this battery was amalgamated with 11th Howitzer Battery (remustered as 11th Hull Heavy Battery).Guns and ammo were transferred from the different sections to this unit who then appear to have embarked to the Kilwa/Lindie district or UK.

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  • 4 years later...

Found this one thanks to that b****y brilliant search facility. Replying to an East African thread I thought I would look up 'Dick Pooley', my Dad's mate who was killed at the Repugi river incident referred to and the CWGC have him as W.Pooley. Of the 64 Pooleys KIA, he is from Madron, Penzance[Dad just wrote Penzance] and is RGA. Died, New Years Day 1917 and buried at Morogoro Cemetery. However, his rank is 'Shoeing Smith' and he was in the 134th. Cornwall Heavy Battery.

I've not only found Dick Pooley but also my Dads Battery too.

Thanks to Dick Flory I know how to look up the 134th. from Dec.15-Dec.17 and must do this soon. Dad wrote that 50 were left of the original 185 in the Battery by August 1917. After reaching England "We became the nucleus of 60 pounder Battery, and were made up to full strength, complete with horses once more. After 3 months another change to 6" howitzers". In 1918 he sailed from Portsmouth to Boulogne, and Ypres.

I love the way this forum has enlightened what has been a few typewritten scraps of paper put together 36 years ago by my 80 year old dad. He really is only next door!

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Phil,

I have the war diary of the 134th Cornwalls if you need a lookup etc. They served alongside the Hull Heavy Battery on the Mgeta and then operated from Lindi using the guns of the Hull Battery. His 50 out of 185 is about right, the Hull mob returned with 61 out of 274 with most of that 61 embarked in South Africa from convalescence.

New years day 1917 was the start of the offensive to cross the Mgeta but I expect your man died in Morogoro hospital.

Roop

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That would be most appreciated, Roop. I have not read a War Diary and have no idea how detailed and to what length they go. The history of the 134th. would be ideal to link with Dad's memoir. It will also clear up some spelling errors!

Cheers for now, Phil.

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OK Phil,

Bear with me and I shall copy some parts of it covering the more important events. This may take a week, it is a rather large diary.

Roop

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Roop,

Thanks again. I'm so looking forward to finding out about the Cornishmen who found themselves in a war-zone on a different Continent, when most had probably never left the County. So sad that many of them, and your Hull boys never came home. I wonder if the Morogoro Cemetery is visited much?

Many regards, Phil.

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Roop

Pages 43 & 44 of Adler, Lorch & Curson's "The South African Field Artillery - GEA & Palestine 1915-1919" contains interesting notes written by Major W.B. Williams of the Cornwall Battery.

The complete notes are mentioned as being in the possession of Major John Gordon-Grey, UDF, South Africa.

Harry

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Thanks for that Harry, only yesterday I was mulling the purchase of that tome to compliment my library. I shall order it directly.

Edit - Apparently non available now.

Roop

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  • 4 years later...
Guest Cornish Maid

Hello, i don't know if anyone will pick this up, but if you do chance by this post, I'm researching my Great Grandfathers service in ww1. He started in the 134th Battery, living in St Buryan and I believe signing up in Penzance. I have found a reference to the Battery in Durban, on their way to German East Africa, in an Archived edition of 'The Cornishman' which is the local Penzance weekly newspaper. It's dated 24th Aug 1916 and the article is entitled 'Cornwall Territorials Visit to Durban' It makes for good reading and can be accessed via Find My Past or the British Library.

If any of you can give me any further information as to which theatres of war they were involved in, and when it would be very much appreciated, my Great Grandfather was Mr James Prowse, my gran always claimed he had served at Gallipolli, and in France also, if any of this could be verified that would be amazing.

Both of James' Brothers lost their lives in WW1, and are remembered in Commonwealth war graves in France and Belgium, having died within a month of each other, Joseph Prowse on the 11th October 1918 and Andrew Prowse on the 11th Nov 1918.

Looking forward (hopefully!!) to a reply

Cornish Maid.

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Welcome to the forum Cornish Maid,

I cannot immediately see a Medal Index Card (MIC) for a James Prowse that would immediately identify him to the 134th Heavy Battery. What was his service number?

Kevin

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  • 4 weeks later...
  • 2 years later...
Guest ChrisHill

Extract from a letter from “Bombadier” to The Cornishman published 6th July 1916. Major Oats was Francis Freathy Oats, son of Francis Oats from St Just, Cornwall who was chairman of De Beers.Father and son had interests in Cornish and South African mines and Major Oats recruited many of his own Cornish miner employees to his battery. his younger brothers Giles & Wilfred were also officers in the RGA.



On the Saturday following the outbreak of war the No2 (Cornwall) Heavy Battery under Major Oats left Penzance for their War Station. Long before the first battalions of the new army were complete the No 2 had a sufficient number of volunteers to form a battery for service overseas; by January 1915, Major Oats had recruited another battery, also for active service. In July the No 2, in conjunction with the No 1 Cornwalls had the honour of being chosen as the Cornwall Battery in the new County Batteries being formed by the War Office, and on August 12th left for Woolwich about 250 strong under the title of '134th Heavy Battery (Cornwall)'. In November they were chosen for service in East Africa, embarking at Southampton on Christmas Day, having previously sent a large number of men to France, Egypt and the Dardanelles.”


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