Jump to content
Free downloads from TNA ×
The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

Working German Women


centurion

Recommended Posts

I'm aware that Germany did not make anything like the extensive use of women to replace men in industry that Britain did but does anyone know of a source of statistics of just how many were employed and in what and as what ?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks it might be just what I need - unfortunately as it's password protected I can't use a translation tool to read it in English

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks - 2nd hand copy ordered from USA - hope it arrives before I have to turn my essay in

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Libraries ?

Kent (English Kent that is !) has a copy in their catalogue. You should be able to get it on a temporary transfer very quickly through your own library.

It would be interesting to hear your comments, in due course, as I have always thought that German womanhood was an underused resource in both World Wars.

The Kaiser, shortly after his succession, was reportedly, the source of the "KKK" quote - Kinder, Küche, Kirche - and Hitler had a similar mindset.

I'd advise against googling your topic title . . . . :blush:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It appears to be one thing the Kaiser and Hitler saw eye to eye on. I know that in WW1 factory medical attendants were packed off to the front to act as first aid men, stretcher bearers and the like and replaced with women but the latter were not in general allowed to work on the factory floor. Women also replaced male domestic staff, some of whom went to the front and others into factories (depending on age etc) so for the first time there were female chefs, waiters were replaced with waitresses etc. Whether there were footwomen at the palace in Potsdam I don't know. I suspect that one reason why Britain and France were able to out produce Germany in many vital areas was a lack of German labour whereas the Allies were using women to fill the gaps.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks it might be just what I need - unfortunately as it's password protected I can't use a translation tool to read it in English

It is not password protected at all. I found it this morning in the web and just opened the pdf file........you just need to paste and copy the text into a translation machine.....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

PDF file opens but wont let me copy (so can't paste) and when I look at the security setting it says it's password protected

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Remember also, the large numbers of foreign workers who were deported to Germany as well as POW's that may have offset the need for as many German women workers.

khaki

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Remember also, the large numbers of foreign workers who were deported to Germany as well as POW's that may have offset the need for as many German women workers.

khaki

More the case in WW2 than WW1

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I saw some data today which suggested a figure of 120,000 Belgian civilians were deported to Germany in the Great War for forced labor, nothing on French, Russians etc, so far. Perhaps others can assist,

khaki

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I saw some data today which suggested a figure of 120,000 Belgian civilians were deported to Germany in the Great War for forced labor, nothing on French, Russians etc, so far. Perhaps others can assist,

khaki

I think the figure may be high. Most Belgians were not used in the factories but as genuine forced labour building roads, digging trenches etc etc.Usually not in Germany but German occupied France supporting the front. Russian POWs were used (illegally) for this as well as were many British POWs. Trinity Dublin have done a lot of research in this area.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd advise against googling your topic title . . . . :blush:

You've tried?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

I saw some data today which suggested a figure of 120,000 Belgian civilians were deported to Germany in the Great War for forced labor, nothing on French, Russians etc, so far. Perhaps others can assist,

khaki

Now have info (mainly from a book on WW1 economics edited by a couple of guys from Warwick university the section on Germany (by a prof from Berlin) indicates that Belgians were only used for 5 months and in much smaller numbers ( about 20,000 and probably mainly in agriculture). Somewhat sinisterly, German Jews were sent off in trains to Poland to labour camps (one wonders if some were sent a 2nd and last time in WW2)

Large numbers of men were employed under contract from neutral countries but POWs were in the majority - mainly in mines and on farms - Russians being in the majority and very badly treated.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Libraries ?

Kent (English Kent that is !) has a copy in their catalogue. You should be able to get it on a temporary transfer very quickly through your own library.

It would be interesting to hear your comments, in due course, as I have always thought that German womanhood was an underused resource in both World Wars.

The Kaiser, shortly after his succession, was reportedly, the source of the "KKK" quote - Kinder, Küche, Kirche - and Hitler had a similar mindset.

I'd advise against googling your topic title . . . . :blush:

Book arrived and I've done a first pass. It seems to be saying that

  • German female employment did not increase that much because of WW1 - especially taking into account the effect of past population growth on extra numbers reaching working age who would have gone to work war or no war
  • Some women who would normally have left work on getting married stayed on working whilst husband was in the forces.
  • The rate of increase of working females actually slowed
  • However the proportion of women in war work (munitions etc) did increase but again not dramatically
  • German trade unions were probably even more hostile to women working than British ones - calling such women "grave diggers!" as they freed up men to go to the front as well as regarding them as a threat to post war employment
  • If there is a German word for omni shambles then it applies to attempts to organise compulsory work for women with central and state governments at odds, the military and the Reichstag arguing, the trade unions being particularly bolshy and the civil servants making a real b****r's muddle of the legislation
  • Hindenburg was no Albert Speer
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I believe I read somewhere where the germans in WW II used more female workers than was previously thought. I think in the book "Inside the Third Reich by Albert Speer mentions a photogragh of workers at a German factory in 1918 that showed most of the work force was female while in 1942 a photo of the same factory's work force was mostly male. In OTF there are a number of photos of german aircraft factories which contain quite a few women. This needs to be looked into more. There is a site "Axis history forum" that has a section on german women you might want to post this question there.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Wages of Destruction by Adam Tooze is supposed to be the definitive work on the rise and fall if the German economy in WW2 (Speer may be just a smidgeon partial). As it happens I've just recently acquired a copy but not yet had a chance to look.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks it might be just what I need - unfortunately as it's password protected I can't use a translation tool to read it in English

If you save the document to your desktop you can then have Google translate do its machine magic. It will do the translation as I have just confirmed it for myself.

Cheers,

Hendo

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you save the document to your desktop you can then have Google translate do its machine magic. It will do the translation as I have just confirmed it for myself.

Cheers,

Hendo

I've bought an English copy as you'll see in post 17 but thanks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...