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Remembered Today:

GR V British Army officers sword?


jay dubaya
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This has been passed to me by my Father-in-law and is believed to have belonged to his Father. Arms are by no means an area that I have knowledge so I would really appreciate comments.

It's approx. 990mm long in the scabbard with the actual blade length of 850mm. Hobson & Sons 1, 3, 5 Lexington St. London are the makers, there is also a Star of David engraved, is this symbolic?

Jon

post-15439-0-69617400-1377869732_thumb.j

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Jon,

The ' Star ' mark is purely a proof mark, and is seen on all proofed swords. It has no other meaning.

Regards,

LF

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Far from being an expert on these myself, but I've had a few over the years. The 'basket' appears (to me) to be slightly narrower than that on the 'service' issue item which would make this a 'picquet' weight sword which was an item purchased for wear on parades and on garrison duties, etc.

Here's a couple of close-ups of the basket on one of my 'picquet' swords.....

Dave

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post-357-0-97270400-1377870631_thumb.jpg

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Thanks for the conformation LF.

I would agree with you Dave in that this is a 'picquet' weight sword, the blade which is not sharpened at all (it does have and incredibly shap point) is very well engraved/etched and is no-where as near tarnished as the basket.

Is there any way to date this sword?

cheers, Jon

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Is there any way to date this sword?

cheers, Jon

Jon,

Hobson and Sons, London - Military Outfitters, founded in 1850, are still in business today. They probably did not actually make the sword, but were rather the retailers of the sword.

Does the sword have a serial number, usually found on the blade spine ? if so, I would try calling Hobsons to see if they have archived sword records.

Without any serial number, it will be hard to accurately date the sword as it could be any time within the reign of KGV - 6 May 1910 - 20 January 1936.

Regards,

LF

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On the better makes the star has a gold stamped centre. LF is spot on in the previous post. Hobson & Son are not on my list of makers supplied by Wilkinson. The other likely candidate in H Mole of Birmingham. They went out of business about 1927 which might narrow the date range.

John

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LF, many thanks for the continued input, I don't recall seeing a serial number or other such embelishment on the blade spine nor anywhere else on the piece, I will however have another look this week-end.

John, I enclose a photo of the gold centred star which is stamped PROVED with a P in the centre

post-15439-0-48943100-1377905535_thumb.j

Jon

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I am surprised to learn that what I also believed to be a star, as in the star of David, are actually two interlocking triangles being an ancient symbol used by armourers found on older Wilkinson swords and also later used by others.

khaki

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I've just read the 1911 Army Dress Regulations regarding swords and to pass the proof test the blade has to be struck in a number of places with a 32 lb Wooden mallet. The blade must bend at least an inch and straighten fully.

John

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  • 2 weeks later...

I am surprised to learn that what I also believed to be a star, as in the star of David, are actually two interlocking triangles being an ancient symbol used by armourers found on older Wilkinson swords and also later used by others.

khaki

The use of the two interlocking triangles has been used by armourers to symbolise 'strength' and has been noted from a few medieval swords onwards. There was also a theory that the 'star' was a masonic symbol which now is pretty much, disproved.

The serial number on a Wilkinson blade is, as far as I know, always on the spine.

David

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