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Lancashire Fusilier

Shot at dawn - British WW1 Military Executions.

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FROGSMILE
1 hour ago, RegHannay said:

Thank you Frogsmile, I will look out for the book. For some reason the name Crozier rings bells .. Dave D


If I recall correctly after the war he either joined the Black and Tans, or was in some way associated with them.  He comes across as an intelligent and competent officer, but something of a thug.

Edited by FROGSMILE

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Maureene
9 hours ago, FROGSMILE said:


 ...you might be interested to know that Private McCracken and his execution were written about by his now infamous commanding officer, Lt Col (later Brig Gen) Frank Crozier, who wrote several books about his military experience, including one called ‘The Men I Killed’.  The books makes good, if rather unedifying, reading.

Available online 

A Brass Hat in No Man's Land by Brig.-Gen. F P Crozier 1930. Archive.org.

The Men I Killed by Brigadier General F P Crozier 1937 Archive.org

 Frank Percy Crozier Wikipedia.

 

Another online book by Crozier, nothing to do with the Great War 

 

Five Years Hard: Being an account of the fall of the Fulani Empire and a picture of the daily life of a Regimental Officer among the people of the Western Sudan by Brigadier-General FP Crozier. 1932 Archive.org. Early 1900s. Note: missing some pages.

 

Cheers

Maureen

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FROGSMILE
5 minutes ago, Maureene said:

Available online 

A Brass Hat in No Man's Land by Brig.-Gen. F P Crozier 1930. Archive.org.

The Men I Killed by Brigadier General F P Crozier 1937 Archive.org

 Frank Percy Crozier Wikipedia.

 

Another online book by Crozier, nothing to do with the Great War 

 

Five Years Hard: Being an account of the fall of the Fulani Empire and a picture of the daily life of a Regimental Officer among the people of the Western Sudan by Brigadier-General FP Crozier. 1932 Archive.org. Early 1900s. Note: missing some pages.

 

Cheers

Maureen


Thanks Maureen, I’m glad to see that you’ve survived the conflagration in NSW.

 

l cannot remember if the details about Pte McCracken are in the Brass hat, or Men I killed book.

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RegHannay
On 15/01/2020 at 20:32, FROGSMILE said:


If I recall correctly after the war he either joined the Black and Tans, or was in some way associated with them.  He comes across as an intelligent and competent officer, but something of a thug.

Yes, just been reading a little about Crozier. Don't think I would have liked him to much

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corisande
On 15/01/2020 at 21:32, FROGSMILE said:

If I recall correctly after the war he either joined the Black and Tans, or was in some way associated with them.  He comes across as an intelligent and competent officer, but something of a thug.

 

Crozier was nothing to do with the Black & Tans.

 

Crozier was OC of the Auxiliary Division of the RIC. I just happen to have a CV on him - click :)

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FROGSMILE
7 hours ago, corisande said:

 

Crozier was nothing to do with the Black & Tans.

 

Crozier was OC of the Auxiliary Division of the RIC. I just happen to have a CV on him - click :)


Yes, I was unsure and so used the expression “or associated with”, as I recalled the RIC Auxiliaries (similar to the much later RUC B-Specials), and meant it in the sense of fellow parts of the British Government forces.  It didn’t seem an unreasonable description?

622F5346-D7C6-4D11-9652-54AF2D9D974C.jpeg

Edited by FROGSMILE

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FROGSMILE
3 hours ago, RegHannay said:

Yes, just been reading a little about Crozier. Don't think I would have liked him to much


I feel that one gets a very clear impression of his character via the following link: https://theauxiliaries.com/men-alphabetical/men-c/crozier/crozier.html

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FROGSMILE
10 minutes ago, RegHannay said:

Mmmm, you certainly would not want to lend him a few quid!!


Yes, he really exemplifies how war changes or distorts social norms in such a profound way.

Edited by FROGSMILE

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corisande

 

I would in all  modestly say that Charles Messenger's life of Crozier

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Broken-Sword-Tumultuous-General-1897-1937-ebook/dp/B00ME3JLDI

Is a much more detailed look at Crozier's life than my web site that you quoted

Read that to get more behind Crozier

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FROGSMILE
2 hours ago, corisande said:

 

I would in all  modestly say that Charles Messenger's life of Crozier

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Broken-Sword-Tumultuous-General-1897-1937-ebook/dp/B00ME3JLDI

Is a much more detailed look at Crozier's life than my web site that you quoted

Read that to get more behind Crozier


I’ve only just realised that the link I posted for RegHannay to see is the same one you posted above (I had not opened it).  Thank you for the tip regarding Charles Messenger’s biography of Crozier, I shall look out for it.

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Maureene

The link previously quoted above  https://theauxiliaries.com/men-alphabetical/men-c/crozier/crozier.html includes an obituary which says Crozier described himself  as “different to anyone else”, and also refers to his lack of subtlety . Croziers’s book about his African experiences reveal a culture of heavy alcohol consumption (seemingly much more so than in the Army in India at the same period ) and I wonder whether this excessive drinking had resulted in some brain changes which negatively impacted on his decision making and behaviour.

 

Cheers

Maureen

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corisande
3 hours ago, Maureene said:

Croziers’s book about his African experiences reveal a culture of heavy alcohol consumption (seemingly much more so than in the Army in India at the same period ) and I wonder whether this excessive drinking had resulted in some brain changes which negatively impacted on his decision making and behaviour.

 

Crozier became teetotal in 1911 and it is believed that he never touched alcohol after that

 

He later became a pacifist too.

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Higgledy

I am surprised this topic caused so much consternation after 100 years. I think it’s sad all around. I don’t judge because I’ve never been in war and never in these soldiers’ boots. 

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