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Remembered Today:

Private Martin Nevin, Royal Irish Regiment, 2nd Bn.


PHall

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Having looked through topics on the Forum and answers thereto, I am awed by the depth and breadth of information you have. I am looking for some answers regarding my grandfather, Martin Nevin, from Tipperary who joined in August 1914, was injured horrifically in the head during the Oct-Nov combat (La Bassee -"First Ypres") and discharged as a result of his injuries, though I cannot work out when.

I would like to know, for example, what his injuries actually were and what would have happened to him once he was taken from the field of battle. Would he have gone to St. Omer, for instance and then been sent back to somewhere in England for treatment?

Also, though I have looked at his service record, I cannot find anywhere an actual medical account of his injuries. I was somewhat disconcerted to discover, as I paid to view the records, that toward the end his files had been mixed up with another M. Nevin from Yorkshire, whose description bore no resemblance to the earlier one of my grandfather (even colour of eyes different). At that point I began to think some of his files had been lost or mislaid. I don't even know if he received a pension.

Lastly, I wonder if there is any record for his treatment anywhere within the army records. He was promised a surgical operation ( something about a plate being inserted in his head?) but he died before this could happen. He died in November 1916, aged 24, never knowing he had a daughter (my mother) born five months later.

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Hi

I have just had a look at the pension record for Martin on Ancestry.

He was injured on 2 May 1915 and discharged 15 Feb 1916.

There is quite a full report on his disability from a medical board on 24 Jan 1916.

Is this what you have read? Also I was not able to find a Silver War Badge record.

I can let you have more details of the medical board if you let me know.

Dental

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Hi and welcome to the Forum

there is a member called Museumtom who has a large collection of newspaper clippings from the southern part of Ireland - I will drop him an email and let him know about the thread. Quite often the newspapers included short biogs/articles about men who died or were wounded.

Nigel

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Given the date of his wounding in Dentals post it would be a good chance it happened during the battle of st julien during 2nd ypres.An enlistment date in august 1914 for a totaly untrained man would not seem likely that he would have entered france/flanders in time for action in october.The battalion were taken out of the line in oct 14 after sustaining very heavy losses.Martin could well have come to join them to replace losses after this.The silver war badge only came to be in september 1916 and would have to be applied for this came very close to your grandfathers death.john

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http://www.cwgc.org/...sualty=75195913

I trust this is your grand father.Sometimes you will find records that are mixed but we are lucky to have any of them as most were destroyed in german bombing in 1940.Hopefully someone will be able to give you some more info.john

Thank you very much, John. Yes, I have this already. It is my Grandfather and when I first saw it, I could hardly believe it. I'm so glad he's remembered in some way.

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Hi

I have just had a look at the pension record for Martin on Ancestry.

He was injured on 2 May 1915 and discharged 15 Feb 1916.

There is quite a full report on his disability from a medical board on 24 Jan 1916.

Is this what you have read? Also I was not able to find a Silver War Badge record.

I can let you have more details of the medical board if you let me know.

Dental

Hi, Dental. The information I had was picked up from museumtom and jdoyle on the Forum which I first read on 18/12/11, where a newspaper report records the death of Martin Nevin and says he was wounded at La Bassee (info posted on Forum June 2011 -09:07AM) Thank you for your help. I'm eternally grateful for all info. Anything else will be great to have.

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Hi and welcome to the Forum

there is a member called Museumtom who has a large collection of newspaper clippings from the southern part of Ireland - I will drop him an email and let him know about the thread. Quite often the newspapers included short biogs/articles about men who died or were wounded.

Nigel

Thanks very much Nigel. I think I have seen an old newspaper report about Martin Nevin published on the Forum by museumtom but I'm always ready for more info! Thanks for the kindly welcome to the Forum.

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Given the date of his wounding in Dentals post it would be a good chance it happened during the battle of st julien during 2nd ypres.An enlistment date in august 1914 for a totaly untrained man would not seem likely that he would have entered france/flanders in time for action in october.The battalion were taken out of the line in oct 14 after sustaining very heavy losses.Martin could well have come to join them to replace losses after this.The silver war badge only came to be in september 1916 and would have to be applied for this came very close to your grandfathers death.john

Hullo, Munster, your information gives me a new perspective entirely. I had thought he was in the La Bassee battle but I can understand what you're saying about him not being trained for combat in time for that. Many thanks. Forgive my ignorance as I am new to this subject area, but what is a Silver War Badge and can it still be applied for if my Grandfather is entitled to it?

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Hi just had a look at martins Medal Index Card it shows he landed in France on 19 December 1914.The Silver war badge can no longer be applied for it was a badge which showed that a man had served and was discharged from the services.john

http://www.1914-1918.net/grandad/swb.htm

You can download this for free before midnight tonight http://search.ancestry.co.uk/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&db=MedalRolls&rank=1&new=1&MSAV=0&msT=1&gss=angs-d&gsfn=m&gsln=nevin&gskw=royal+irish&dbOnly=_F0003FD8%7c_F0003FD8_x%2c_F0003FD9%7c_F0003FD9_x&uidh=avr&pcat=39&fh=12&h=1743000&recoff=10

I was wrong in assuming he joined in 1914 he joined 1/2/11 if you go through his records again today whilst free they realy do answer the questions you have asked reason he was not at first Ypres is he and the Batallion he was with (1st) at the time were on the way home fom india.

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NEVIN, MARTIN. Rank: Private. Regiment or Service: Royal Irish Regiment. Unit; 2nd Bn. Age at Death: 24. Date of Death: 12-November-1916. (injured 2 May 1915 and discharged 15 Feb 1916). Service No: 10166. Supplementary information; Son of Francis and Mary Nevin of Frolic, Carney ; husband of Ellie Nevin of Prospect, Nenagh, Co. Tipperary.

Unknown Regional Newspaper.

Death of Private Martin Nevin.

Royal Irish Regiment.

It is with deep regret we record the death (from wounds) of this gallant soldier, which took place at his home, Prospect, Puckane, on Tuesday last. He took part in most of the terrible fighting in which our gallant Tipperary Regiment was engaged during the first year of the war, and was badly wounded in the head at La Bassee. After lingering in hospital for many months he was finally discharged as a hopeless case several months ago, and died on Tuesday last. His death was a happy release, for the poor fellow suffered much. He received all the consolations of the Catholic Church, for the good priests of the parish were unremitting in their attention to this brave solder. Peace be to his ashes. He died a noble death for a just cause. He was laid to rest “amongst his own” by the revenent hands of the neighbours. Rev Father Murray recited the Office and prayers for the dead. Considerable indignation was aroused by the neglect of the military authorities in not sending any representatives to pay the last tribute of respect and honour to poor Private Nevin’s remains. We understand that the military were communicated with at once and given the date, hour, and place of the funeral. This is a matter that will have to be explained at once. Thus apparent neglect of what we believe is the duty of the military to pay the honours due to a fine soldier who laid down his life for his King and country will not tend to encourage recruiting.

The following is an extract from a letter which we have received from a highly respected gentleman, who was present at the funeral, and which, he says, indicates the feeling of indignation aroused in the district over this painful episode;

“There was neither policeman or soldier, any of the military authorities, or any of the Shannon shoneens present or represented at the poor fellow’s funeral—a poor return to a man who sacrificed his life in the service of the country. Have the police extra pay for such functions as attending the funerals of shoneens, as I invariably seen them present on such occasions. No doubt civil and military authorities will figure at the obsequies of a half-pay officer never went beyond the parade ground. Where were those authorities—and they were informed—and why wre they not represented at the funeral of poor Nevin, who received his death wound at La Bassee, and why was he not accorded a military funeral?

Cemetery: Cloughprior Cemetery, Tipperary.

NEVIN, THOMAS. Rank: Sergeant. Regiment or Service: East Lancashire Regiment. Unit; 1st Bn. Date of Death: 1-September-1914. Service No: 8748. Born in Borrisokane, Co Tipperary. Enlisted in Birr while living in Woking in Surrey. Died of wounds. Killed in Action. He has no known grave but is listed on the La Ferte-Sous-Jouarre-Memorial in France.

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A sincere and heartfelt Thank You to Everyone on the Forum who has entered into my search for details about my Grandfather, Private Martin Nevin.

I know I could never have gained so much information in such a short time without your kind advice and knowledge. It is truly heart-warming to find people so ready to share their expertise and offer solutions. I have been on a fast-track learning curve for the past few days and can now begin to draw together all the strands of Martin's short life. Thank you again, one and all. What a splendid resource you are! I hope you won't mind if I have to return for clarification in my on-going research. Kind regards to all.

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Good to have you on the forum Patsy and you are very welcome. We all help each other. Often when I am in a quandary I throw my queries out to the lads and lassies on the forum and they have never let me down. Whenever I get the chance to step into the helper's shoes I am happy to do so and the thing is so is everyone else here. We are all on a journey, to nail down that elusive bit of info that will put us on the straight and narrow.

A thank you is always welcome and shows that ones (do I sound like the Queen?) efforts is appreciated.

Kind regards.

Tom.

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Good to have you on the forum Patsy and you are very welcome. We all help each other. Often when I am in a quandary I throw my queries out to the lads and lassies on the forum and they have never let me down. Whenever I get the chance to step into the helper's shoes I am happy to do so and the thing is so is everyone else here. We are all on a journey, to nail down that elusive bit of info that will put us on the straight and narrow.

A thank you is always welcome and shows that ones (do I sound like the Queen?) efforts is appreciated.

Kind regards.

Tom.

Tom, many thanks for that. :)

Every good wish,

Patsy

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  • 2 years later...

Hi

Am part of a group in the Kilbarron Terryglass area of Co Tipperary and we plan on holding a commemoration ceremony to honour all those from the area who took part in WW1 next July we are seeking relatives who can assist and perhaps even visit our commemoration , Martin Nevin was we understand born in the parish at Annagh Coolbawn and then lived in Frolic Carney .

Would love to hear more about his life do please contact me here

Regards Bill Ryan.

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I have to admit, when I visited the cemetery in Terryglass to photograph the Esmonde plaque and crypt, I was stunned by the layout of the cemetery. It is the most beautiful cemetery in Ireland I reckon. Perhaps Bill might post a few pics? There is not a blade of grass out of place, its a credit to you all.

Tom.

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Hi Tom

Yes it really is a lovely place on the Lough Derg shore will try to add some photos here if there is anything specific you wish to get photograph headstone perhaps let me know we run a Facebook page also "Ireland Reaching Out Borrisokane Kilbarron Terryglass " some good photos there .

Regards Bill.

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Thanks Bill. I am sure the lads and lassies on the forum would appreciate the layout of the cemetery.

Kind regards.

Tom.

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  • 6 months later...

Hi all

Just to add to the topic in the parish of Kilbarron Terryglass Co Tipperary a small farming village we had a commemoration ceremony on 29th July in the village to honour all those from the parish who took part in the war, sixty eight in total fourteen who were killed in action or died of wounds as in the case of Martin Nevin.

We also produced a really lovely booklet containing names photos and all info we obtained on all of the above.

Since publication of book we have discovered at least six more names of participants from the area.

Regards

Bill

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