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Jim_Grundy

Three Course Meals

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Nepper

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Scalyback

Currently on Yesderday channel is "Edwardian supersize me". Slightly pre-war but upper middle class and upper class would by the looks of it eat a lot.

So coming back to DORA. Is the control of eating out seen to be "clamping down"? With my reference to rabbits earlier. I think Socio-economic groups in town and country would be diffrent at the time? Low paid farm worker would be able to obtain meat(be it rabbit, duck or other) compared to a inner city worker?

Out of intrest, what did officers have sent to them in hampers from Fortnum and Mason?

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centurion

Currently on Yesderday channel is "Edwardian supersize me". Slightly pre-war but upper middle class and upper class would by the looks of it eat a lot.

So coming back to DORA. Is the control of eating out seen to be "clamping down"? With my reference to rabbits earlier. I think Socio-economic groups in town and country would be diffrent at the time? Low paid farm worker would be able to obtain meat(be it rabbit, duck or other) compared to a inner city worker?

Out of intrest, what did officers have sent to them in hampers from Fortnum and Mason?

Some had a special box of Cocaine, Heroin and Opium (and a hypodermic) in a Fortnum and Mason's gift wrapping (I kid you not) - this was legal then (but made illegal mid war)

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Scalyback

Aware of the extra help, as such. Cpl Jones you can not have a beer in the trench. However 2nd Lt Jones-Griffiths can have a nice line in hard drugs..........

Any sources for officer dining out of the line in the regimental mess and how the cooks obtained the said food? Fortnum and Mason(other brands of hamper availble) say "While the usual quantity of tuck found its way to the trenches, where we soon learned that only metal tins were any use against the ever-present gourmet rats."

How can you have a supply line one way without restrictions, yet at home say limit what you can eat? Just found this food and socio-economic thing intresting!

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Magnumbellum

One source of extra-to-official-rations food in the field generally, not just the trenches, was from local farms, sometimes literally stolen (livestock or vegetables), sometimes bartered in one way or another.

On informal rationing at home, I had a first-hand account from a child in WW1: the word went out that the local grocer had a supply of jam. Customers were required to bring their own jar, into which the jam was ladled from a vat - one jar full per customer, so large families would send several childrem each with a jar.

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