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Remembered Today:

Interpreting AEF data


marc leroux
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I'd appreciate some help deciphering this entry.

Benjamin Franklin Hoagland

S/N 1195938

From Chillicothe, enlisted Columbus July 6, 1917 age 19 years 7 months

Private 1st class

Promoted Corporal July 24, 1919 ??

Served in Aisne, Champagne-Marne, Aisne-Marne, St Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne ??

Honorably Discharged Aug 30 1919

Any clarifications would be appreciated.

tia

marc

post-1-1090892974.jpg

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Marc:

No expert, but it appers to be:

Hoagland, Benjamin F.

Serial number: 1195938 (race) White

(Home address) 184 East 7th Street

Chillicothe, Ohio

Enlisted at Columbus Barracks, Ohio July 6, 1917 (not sure R.A. , Rendezvous A-?) Recruitment A-?)

Born: Marietta, Ohio, Aged: 19 years, 7 months

F Hosp 5 3 Sn Tn to disch (don't know?)

Promoted Private 1st Class (MD-don't know) March 10th, 1919

Promoted Corporal July 24th, 1919

Campaigns in which he served (sometimes recognized as bars on Victory Medal):

Aisne, Champagne-Marne, Aisne-Marne, St. Mihiel, Meuse-Argonne, Defensive Sector. Was a member of the American Expeditionary Force from March 14, 1918, until August 20, 1919. He was honorably discharged, August 30, 1919.

Chris

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5th Field hospital, 3rd Sanitary train was a component of the 3rd infantry Division, "The Rock of the Marne".

The six campaigns listed correspond to the six bars awarded on his Victory Medal.

'RA' is Regular Army the Third was a Regular Division.

Take care,

Neil

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Thank's guys.

What was a "Sanitary train"

Chillicothe is a pretty place. Used to be the capital of Ohio as well!

marc

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Hi Marc,

Ambulances and Field Hospitals mostly. I'm drawing a blank whether delousing stations were independent units or organic to divisions. I know mobile laundry were independent.

Can check this evening for you.

Take care,

Neil

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Thanks Paul/Neil.

I know that he came out of the Army, married and went on to become a dentist.

marc

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What was a "Sanitary train"

Marc: A Sanitary Train was a Division's Medical Support Unit. It usually had 4 x Hospitals (field) and 4 x Ambulance Companies. They'd farm out the ambulance companies to support the Brigades as the Hospitals remained General Support to the Division.

Kevin

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Thanks, Kevin

Where did the name "Sanitary Train" come from?

marc

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Guest AmericanDoughboy
Thanks, Kevin

Where did the name "Sanitary Train" come from?

marc

Marc,

I believe the term "Sanitary Train" comes from the Hospital Train that took wounded American soldiers from the battlefields or hospitals to a more efficient hospital. They carried many military surgeons who struggled to keep many of the wounded men alive. Thus being called the "Sanitary Train."

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Thanks, Kevin

Where did the name "Sanitary Train" come from?

marc

Marc: I'll defer to Doughboy on origins but I can tell you we still use "trains" as a doctrinal term.

Combat arms battalions still have two "trains": Combat Trains (medical platoon, supply platoon [-] and maintenance) which operate about 3-5 km behind the companies and Field Trains (remainder of support) which operate about 10-15 km behind the companies.

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To further confuse the issue, I was under the impression that they were referred to as trains since they were most often either wagon or mule drawn (ammunition, field hospitals etc.) units.

Take care,

Neil

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Thanks, guys. Actually I was having less trouble with 'train' than with 'sanitary'. I'm guessing that it had to do with cleanliness, but I've been wrong many times on my assumptions.

marc

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From an (Old) New Webster's Dictionary:

Sanitary: Pertaining to or designed to promote health; relating to the preservation of health; hygenic

Neil

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Dictionary!

Darn, why didn't I think of that. :rolleyes:

Thank's Neil

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