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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

WW1 Medals Being Issued


TParker96

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Hi,

I was able to find one of my relatives Death Plaque in the family which belonged to R/24410 Rifleman James Arthur Gardiner who was a member of the 18th Battalion King's Royal Rifle Corps and was killed in action on 14th June 1917, but the person who had his death plaque didn't have his medals and she didn't know what happened to them and she never remembered ever seeing them.

One thing i wanted to ask is whether the next-of-kin was given the soldiers medals automatically or did they have to apply for them?

And is it likely that they may still be in the family or may have they been sold and what are the chances of me finding them?

Thanks

Tom

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The medals were sent automatically to the next of kin. Normally the medal roll and index card would be marked had the medals been returned as undeliverable. As for whether they are still in the family - who knows. You could try an internet search to see if they have been sold or mentioned recently.

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Tom,

The medals would have gone to the NoK.

I'm in a similar position all I can say is keep asking round the family. My great grand aunt remembers seeing the medals but doesn't know where they ended up, she was 1 of 11 so after a few generations that's a lot of possible people over what was the empire. I now have the family looking. Also on the other side of my family we have a plaque but I'm yet to do the research and just don't have a clue, yet.

All the best in your search,

Alex

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Hi,

Thank you for your help and advice. Hopefully with a bit more research and a bit more looking around and asking as many of the possible relatives who have the medals or have at least seen them possible then i should be able to find them with a bit of luck.

It's just a matter of thinking who to ask.

Tom

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In my case, the few remaining records from my great-uncles's (see signature) service papers included a memo indicating his medals should be sent to his fiancee. I had thought his mother would have been his NOK. I don't know whether his family had made this request in recognition of her relationship. Another mystery unlikely to be solved.

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Whichever dusty old box you haven't looked at, they're in that one.

I had the same experience with my grandfather's Iron Cross. I wll find it some day, dag gummit.

Daniel

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... included a memo indicating his medals should be sent to his fiancee.

If this "request" was indeed a codicil to his Will [ie by the soldier] then it would have been acted upon in accordance with his wishes,had his Family requested it,post mortem, then I suspect they would have been initially sent to them to dispose of as they saw fit... :poppy:

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Don't forget that Henry Allingham's long-lost medals, officially replaced long since, recently reappeared in an old tool box of his.

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Hi,

Thank you all for your responses, they're all very useful and have inspired even more to try and find them even more.

Tom

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Slighty of topic when medals can't be found are the replicas any good, I do a bit of drum majoring and in the absence of the real mc'coy, was thinking of buying replicas to wear on my tunic

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If this "request" was indeed a codicil to his Will [ie by the soldier] then it would have been acted upon in accordance with his wishes,had his Family requested it,post mortem, then I suspect they would have been initially sent to them to dispose of as they saw fit... :poppy:

Thats an interesting subject, how would he have known he would be awarded medals? I have copies of the letters sent from the brother of an officer killed in 1918 asking why his medals had been sent to the father when the deceased brother had specifically stated that he wanted his personal effects sent to the brother. Of course there was no mention of medals because he only knew he had been awarded the MC on paper.

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Thats an interesting subject, how would he have known he would be awarded medals? I have copies of the letters sent from the brother of an officer killed in 1918 asking why his medals had been sent to the father when the deceased brother had specifically stated that he wanted his personal effects sent to the brother. Of course there was no mention of medals because he only knew he had been awarded the MC on paper.

Had he been awarded a '14 or '14-15 star? The 14 star was authorized in 1917, and the 15 star some time in 1918, I believe.

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You are quite right and I don't know when the soldier mentioned in the earlier thread died, but for a soldier to write a note saying where he wanted his medals to go if he died seems a bit odd. The issue of medals was discussed as early as June 1915 but dismissed as being premature, again in May 1916 no decision had been made about the issue of medals and there was even some suggestion then of suspending the issue of the Territorial Force Efficiency medal. In June 1917 it was still being considered. I don't think the 1914 Star was discussed publicly until late 1917 early 1918.

1914 Star: Army Order 350 of 1917

1914~15 Star: Army Order 20 of 1919

BWM 1914~1920: Army Order 266 of 1919

Allied Victory Medal:Army Order 301 of 1919

There were further amendments to these.

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