Jump to content
Free downloads from TNA ×
The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

I say Oultersteene, you say Outtersteene


b3rn

Recommended Posts

Consistently in primary documents I see this town (about 5 kilometres south-west of Bailleul) referred to as "Oultersteene" -- but the modern town and many other references to it say "Outtersteene"

Is 'Oultersteene' just an archaic version?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

From the 8th Royal Scots History written in 1919.

"From the 14th to 27th April 1915,the Battalion enjoyed a period of rest at Estaires,and learned that even campaigning could be pleasant.It moved back to its old billet at "OUTERSTEEN" towards the end of the month".

Modern French Road Map spells "OUTTERSTEENE"

George

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Australian Casualty Clearing Stations call it "Oultersteene" in their diaries; so does Butler in his official medical history ... I thought of this reading Kirsty Harris' meticulously researched book More than Bombs and Bandages (2011) where she too uses "Oultersteene".

Diane - good point; but regarding your second post, it's not just one variant - seems consistent in Aust. primary documents as "Oultersteene"; dycer - there's another version for the melting pot

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's Outtersteene. Every instance of the use of Oultersteene is an error.

But trench maps are not necessarily a sound reference: I found at least one place when researching for my book where the name given in every British source I could find (maps, diaries, official histories etc) had it wrong and had made a simple error of reading a French place name. Such errors get carried from one work to another.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

RE: Such errors get carried from one work to another

Thanks Chris.

A.G. Butler's use of "Oultersteene" in the Aust. official medical history leads us astray ... but he's not the only to make the error ... (incidentally, good example of how quickly Google indexes GWF)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi,

how it was written after WWI

Cnock

post-7723-0-94649800-1308491977.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Australian Casualty Clearing Stations call it "Oultersteene" in their diaries; so does Butler in his official medical history ... I thought of this reading Kirsty Harris' meticulously researched book More than Bombs and Bandages (2011) where she too uses "Oultersteene".

Diane - good point; but regarding your second post, it's not just one variant - seems consistent in Aust. primary documents as "Oultersteene"; dycer - there's another version for the melting pot

You're relying on Diggers for spelling :w00t: ???!!! They even pronounce it eyeterstyne !! (Sorry, Diane) Antony

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cnock,

The rest of the 8th Royal Scots historical review of "Outersteen".

"It was at this village that the Battalion came first in contact with the peasants,and the welcome received on their return was a testimony of how "Soldats Ecossais" were beloved.When the Battalion passed this village in the days to follow,it brought back happy memories,many stories,and a feeling of home.The Cadre passed it on their way home,but to their deep regret,found that the village had been utterly destroyed during the enemy's offensive in the spring of 1918."

George

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree with piorun :D :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:D The C.O.'s sister lives in Nahra and they have Cake-aburrahs in the back yahd so I learned the lingo when I was over there playing rahgah. Terrific, if rather sad, photo from Cnock. Cheers, mate. Antony
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You're relying on Diggers for spelling :w00t: ???!!! They even pronounce it eyeterstyne !! (Sorry, Diane) Antony

You are forgiven :innocent:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...